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Image from page 72 of "Workingmen's standard of living in Philadelphia : a report by the Bureau of Municipal Research of Philadelphia" (1919) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 72 of "Workingmen's standard of living in Philadelphia : a report by the Bureau of Municipal Research of Philadelphia" (1919)

Identifier: workingmensstand00bure

Title: Workingmen's standard of living in Philadelphia : a report by the Bureau of Municipal Research of Philadelphia

Year: 1919 (1910s)

Authors: Bureau of Municipal Research (Philadelphia, Pa.) Beyer, William Carl, 1887- Davis, Rebekah P Thwing, Myra

Subjects: Cost and standard of living -- Pennsylvania Philadelphia Working class -- Pennsylvania Philadelphia Labor movement -- Pennsylvania Philadelphia Labor -- Pennsylvania Philadelphia

Publisher: New York : The Macmillan Co.

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

4 1913-14 89.9 431.8 108.9 The food allowance in the above standard provides110.8 grams of protein, 460.4 grams of carbohydrates,and 92.2 grams of fat. In Tables 6, 7, and 8 are showTi in detail the variousarticles and quantities of food consumed by threedistinct groups of workingmens famihes whose foodpurchases were ascertained and analyzed. Basis of prices. The prices appearing in the abovestandard are those current during the first week in De-cember, 1918. They were obtained by averaging thequotations of cash and carry stores in various in-dustrial sections of the city and are for the most partconsiderably lower than prices in other neighborhoodsand than prices in the small credit stores in the sameneighborhoods. In the case of seasonal foods, such asfruits and fresh vegetables, the prices given are oftenthose prevaihng during the summer rather than inDecember, because these articles are usually not boughtout of season when prices are considerably higher. The Standard of Living 57

 

Text Appearing After Image:

.5 5 o c -o « of 2Gcordsbook I m <u X, o »-. -ti ci ^ 3 8 2° (o CO 1 oj v^ O *J . ir/-c/e/ [ 19/-/:/s/1 ^ e foodaccounho kept j^jI 1^1 ) •2^3 1 Q i:^ jumptn of 3mptio 1 1 AZ-r/iT/ c .2 ^ <-0 e^ l_ 9/-^/6/ <0 -3 a 8 1 19^ < 2 3-3 ^ So -i 9/-Z/.■2SJ\ 2 J2_C a t. represents the average f esents the ave \ 1 o CO .2 -t^/-P/^ 1 1 ^ c3 to ^ b W a g- e/-//,{Z 1 (3 1 -►JT3 -ac ar labele bar rep fourth b 1*1 S E o ond b e thirc The 13-14. i o S to eH 00 ^ 1 ^ The The ies. 917-1 urine :;i »H TS 58 Workingmens Standard of Living in Philadelphia Table 6. Annual Food Consumption as Shown by Estimates.By Classes and Articles op Food Classes and articles OF FOOD All olasses Bread and cereals Barley Bread Buckwheat Buns and rolls Cakes, miscellaneous Cereals, ready-cooked, unspecified. Cornflakes Cornmeal Cornstarch Crackers Flour, wheat Gra

  

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Taken circa 1919