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Image from page 298 of "History of the flag of the United States of America : and of the naval and yacht-club signals, seals, and arms, and principal national songs of the United States, with a chronicle of the symbols, standards, banners, and flags of an | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 298 of "History of the flag of the United States of America : and of the naval and yacht-club signals, seals, and arms, and principal national songs of the United States, with a chronicle of the symbols, standards, banners, and flags of an

Identifier: historyofflagofu00preb

Title: History of the flag of the United States of America : and of the naval and yacht-club signals, seals, and arms, and principal national songs of the United States, with a chronicle of the symbols, standards, banners, and flags of ancient and modern nations

Year: 1894 (1890s)

Authors: Preble, George Henry, 1816-1885

Subjects: Flags -- United States Seals (Numismatics) -- United States National songs -- United States Signals and signaling Flags

Publisher: Boston, Mass. New York, N.Y. : Houghton, Mifflin and Co.

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

our banner are five-pointed,while those on our coins are, and always have been, six-pointed. Theanswer is, that the designer of our early coins followed the English,and the designer of our flag the European, custom.^ In the heraldiclanguage of England, the star has six points; in the heraldry of Hol-land, France, and Germany, the star is five-pointed. Mr. William J. Canby, in 1870, read before the Historical Society ofPennsylvania a paper on the American Flag, in which he claimed that his maternal giandmother,Mrs. John Eoss,^ w^as themaker and partial designerof the first flao; combiningthe stars and stripes. Thehouse where this flag wasmade is now No. 239 ArchStreet, below Third; it is asmall two-storied and attictenement, formerly No.89, and was occupied byMrs. Ptoss after the deathof her first husband. Theillustration is from a pho-tograph furnished by Mr.Canby. A committee of Con-gress, he asserts, accompa-nied by General Washing-ton, in June, 1776,^ calledupon Mrs. Eoss, who was

 

Text Appearing After Image:

House where the first Stars and Strijies are said to Lavebeen made. ^ Editor Historical Magazine. - Mrs. Rosss maiden name was Griscom. After the death of Mr. Ross, she mar-ried, second, Ashburn, who died a prisoner of war in the Mill Prison, England ; and, third,John Claypole, a lineal descendant of Oliver Cromwell. Mrs. Rosss first husband wasthe nephew of Colonel George Ross, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 3 Washington was called from New York to Philadelphia, June, 1776, to advise withCongress on the state of aflairs just previous to the Declaration of Independence, and wasabsent from Xew York fifteen days. — Sparlss Washinyton, p. 177. LiKi iiKK.IN AM ri;n(;i;i;ss t»r IllH an uphulstoivr, iiiul cugu^uJ licr lu make the Hag iunn a rough draw-ing, whicli, at lier suggestion, was redrawn by General Washington inpencil in her ]»ack parlor. The tlag tin is designed was adopted by<ongress, an<l was, acconling to Mr. Iiiiiliy, the lirst star-spangledban

  

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Taken circa 1894