new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
Image from page 124 of "A natural system of elocution and oratory : founded on an analysis of human constitution, considered in its three-fold nature--mental, physiological and expressional" (1886) | by Internet Archive Book Images
Back to photostream

Image from page 124 of "A natural system of elocution and oratory : founded on an analysis of human constitution, considered in its three-fold nature--mental, physiological and expressional" (1886)

Identifier: naturalsystemofe00hyde

Title: A natural system of elocution and oratory : founded on an analysis of human constitution, considered in its three-fold nature--mental, physiological and expressional

Year: 1886 (1880s)

Authors: Hyde, Thomas A. (Thomas Alexander), 1859-1925 Hyde, William, of Cambridge

Subjects: Elocution Oratory

Publisher: New York : Fowler & Wells Co. London : L.N. Fowler & Co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

 

 

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

 

 

Text Appearing Before Image:

NT OF OTHERS. Contempt, Sneering and Defiance.—We come nowto a peculiar class of feelings, which have an elementof self-estimation or pride, but yet derive their mostessential character from influences outside of, butaffecting self. These emotions are called by variousnames but they are essentially the same; there is anelement of wounded pride, and a desire to return re-tribution upon the offender in them all. They areemotions highly oratorical. The arguments of an op-ponent may be dismissed effectually by a sneer of thelip or a look of contempt. To give the impressionthat what has been said by an opponent against thecause which the speaker advocates is worthy only ofscorn and contempt has a great influence upon an SELE-REOARmNG EMOTIONS. 113 audience. Men in general have a natural pride intheir intelligence, and they are readily moved toabandon a cause which appears weak and insignifi-cant. This feeling is very powerful in the minds ofmen, especially when congregated together. They

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Contempt. are prone to consider that the attention of all presentwill be concentrated upon them, and that a poor es-timate of their intelligence will be formed by many ifthey are known to support principles which are worthyonly of scorn. To avoid this they will be careful toexpose only those measures which are free from ricli- 114 ELOCUTION AND ORATORY. cule, and such principles as a speaker may treat withcontempt will be accepted with caution. CONTEMPT. Contempt is the minds retributive estimateof bad actions. The causes of contempt arevarious; they generally spring, however, fromwounded pride. A man moving in high station fullof wealth and honors may feel a contempt for thosebeneath him especially if an inferior wounds his dig-nity. Criticism of our actions or abilities by an in-ferior may arouse this feeling in our breasts. Pride,vanity and self-promotion stimulate this passion. Language.—The language varies in the expressionof this emotion according to the cause or nature ofthe

 

 

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

537 views
1 fave
0 comments