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Image from page 256 of "The life of Abraham Lincoln, drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished" (1900) | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 256 of "The life of Abraham Lincoln, drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished" (1900)

Identifier: lifeofabrahamlin01lctarb

Title: The life of Abraham Lincoln, drawn from original sources and containing many speeches, letters and telegrams hitherto unpublished

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors: Tarbell, Ida M. (Ida Minerva), 1857-1944

Subjects: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865

Publisher: New York, The Doubleday & McClure co.

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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the War Depart-ment that, in his opinion, no such movement was necessary tothe defence or protection of Texas. In January Lincoln followed up these resolutions with aspeech in support of his position. His action was much criti-cised in Illinois, where the sound of the drum and the intoxi-cation of victory had completely turned attention from themoral side of the question, and Lincoln found himself obligedto defend his position with even Mr. Herndon, his law part-ner, who, with many others, objected to Lincolns voting forthe Ashburn resolution. That vote, wrote Lincoln in answer to Mr. Hemdonsletter, affirms that the war was unnecessarily and unconsti-tutionally commenced by the President; and I will stake mylife that if you had been in my place you would have votedjust as I did. Would you have voted what you felt and knewto be a lie? I know you would not. Would you have goneout of the House—skulked the vote? I expect not. If youhad skulked one vote, you would have had to skulk many

 

Text Appearing After Image:

THE EARLIEST I>ORTRAIT UF AI!RAII\.\I 1.1 NtOI.N. AUOtIT 1848. ACE.^. From till oriKinul (lamierrciilyiu. owned by Mr. Lincolns son. tlie Hon. Rolx-rt T. Lin-coln, thronirh whose courtesy it w;ls lirsl publishefl in Mi:C!nres Mai^azine for Novem-lier, IS.IV U was afterw.-inis republislied in ilie McClure Life of Lincoln, and in theCentnrv M.it^a/.ine for Februarj, I^■y7. IN WASHINGTON IN 1847 215 more before the end of the session. Richardsons resolutions,intr^ichiced iiefore 1 made any move or gave any vote uponthe subject, make the cHrect (juestion of the justice of thewar; so that no man can be silent if he would. You are com-pelled to speak; and your only alternative is to tell the truthor a lie. I cannot doubt which you would do. This vote has nothing to do in determining my votes onthe questions of supplies. I have always intendeil, and stillintend, to vote supplies; perhaps not in the precise form rec-ommended l)y the President, but in a better form for all pur-poses, exce

  

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Taken circa 1900