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Image from page 228 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 228 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

Garden near Loch Kishorn, Ross. From a water-colour drawing by K

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Orange-trees in tubs, Tuileries. THE SUMMER GARDEN BEAUTIFUL {continued).CHAPTER XVII. PLANTS IN VASES AND TUBS IN THE OPEN AIR. In old days and for ages it was not easy—not always possibleto many—to have a garden in the open air. The need of mutualaid against the enemy threw people into closely-packed cities, andeven small towns in what might seem to us now the open country.In our own country, free for many years from external enemies, wehave spread our gardens over the land more than others ; but in Francefarmers still go home to a town at night from the open, and oftenhomeless and barnless plain, where they work. And so it camethat the land of Europe was strewn with towns and cities, oftenfortified, and many of those most able to enjoy gardens had to do-the best they could with little terraces, walls, tubs by the door, andeven windows. And often in Italy and other countries of the southof Europe and north Africa we see beautiful plants in tubs, onbalconies, on flat roofs, and e

 

 

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