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Image from page 229 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 229 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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; but the custom isbound up with ways of growing plants which are still essentialto us in some cases. In many gardens plants in tubs are often used without good reason,,for example, when hardy evergreen trees are grown in tubs, and infront of the Royal Exchange in London there are hardy Poplarsin tubs ! But some may pursue this sort of gardening with advantage PLANTS IN VASES AND TUBS IN THE OPEN AIR. 215 —first, those who have no gardens, and, secondly, those who have andwho may desire to put half-hardy bushes in the open air, for exampleMyrtle or Oleander or Orange, which may not be grown out-of-doorsthroughout the year, and which yet may have fragrance or othercharms for us. Many plants can be grown in the open air in summerwhich will not endure our winters, but which placed in a cellar, dryroom, or cool greenhouse would be quite safe, and might then be putout-of-doors in summer. This way is commonly the case abroadwith large Datura, Pomegranate, and Myrtles, and a great variety

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Vase plants at Turvey Abbey. of plants such as we see put out in tubs in certain old palacegardens, like those of Versailles. What was called the orangery,which has almost disappeared from English gardens, was for keepingsuch plants alive and well through the winter, and in old times,if not now, had a very good reason to be. There are many charming plants too tender for the open altogetherthat are happy in tubs, and may be sheltered in an outhouseor greenhouse through the winter—such as the Pomegranate, theMyrtle, and Romneya (the White Bush Poppy). The blue AfricanLily is often happy in tubs, its blue flowers when seen on a terrace THE ENGLISH FLOWER GARDEN. walk having a distinct charm, but in England, generally, it must bekept indoors in winter. Excellent use may be made of the great handsome oil-jars, whichare used to bring olive oil from Italy to London, and the best thingsto put in them are half-hardy plants, which can be taken intact intothe cool greenhouse or conservatory at

 

 

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