Discussions (137)

White Balance and the importance of it

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Yohan M. says:

Small test I did to see if my D90 is able to manage correctly the WB setting. It's obvious now that if you let the equipment choose for yourself, you should expect trouble.

Now that said, It's okto use auto in an obvious light but when the light become more complicated always think to take out your either expodisc, x-rite tablet or even the basic grey card.
opinion?


 by Yohan M.

11:35AM, 29 September 2010 PDT (permalink)

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poppaJ says:

shoot RAW correct in post or set custom WB
95 months ago (permalink)

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blee3x says:

I agree with poppaJ. RAW is the way to go.
95 months ago (permalink)

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Yohan M. says:

I've shooted RAW imported in Lightroom SOOC. Shooting RAW is not the solution. Yes you can correct it postprod but it will be never like having right from the start. Correct in post it's lame. The job of a photograph is to master is art, not correcting it after word.
95 months ago (permalink)

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cuulblu says:

Often speed is of the essence in my work. I can correct in post faster than checking and changing settings before pressing the button. But then what I shoot isn't art, it's more like catalog shots.
95 months ago (permalink)

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Yohan M. says:

Is that not a phototips forum? So we need to give tips, not find a way around bad technique. Postprod is good to IMPROVE your photo, not using it to fill a gap in your technique.
95 months ago (permalink)

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jedmgrant says:

The tip is: to shoot fast let the camera choose and correct in post. It's WAY faster when you're moving. Setting white balance is great if your environment and light is controlled.
95 months ago (permalink)

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Michael Sharmo says:

Always an interesting topic which is often a longer answer that what is usually given. I'd say "it depends"...

If you're on a shoot in a studio environment, or somewhere where you're going to shoot a lot of images and the quality and colour of light won't change then take the time to either set your white balance or at least take a shot with a grey card etc. It literally takes a few seconds and saves you having to play with it in POST, although you can of course change it in POST if you want to; especially if shooting RAW.

If you're running and gunning in situations where light is changing a lot. From inside to outside to mixtures of ambient and strobe etc...probably easiest to sit on Auto White Balance and add it as part of your POST workflow.

The most important thing is to understand WB and how to set it in camera or in POST to give you the most options and allow you to decide where you want to do your WB.
95 months ago (permalink)

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Damien Franco is a group administrator Damien Franco says:

I'm inclined to agree with Michael on this topic.

Gray cards are great to use in controlled lighting situations. This does save tons of time in post production. It doesn't have to necessarily be a studio set up. If you're doing, as an example, hundreds of photographs at a venue where the light is even throughout the room then setting the WB is a great idea.

I think that gray cards particularly help out most when photographing people or when doing product photography.
95 months ago (permalink)

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Yohan M. says:

I agree with Damien and Michael. WB can be preset for a reason. I never said to set your WB everytime you change place

I said: It's ok to use auto in an obvious light but when the light become more complicated always think to take out your either expodisc, x-rite tablet or even the basic grey card.
95 months ago (permalink)

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