vt335 2:46pm, 5 April 2008
2nd Presbyterian Church


I have a real problem with blown highlights where anything meets the sky. If you notice, where the tree and the sky meet the limbs lose alot of detail. Does anyone know how to solve this problem? Any photoshop fix or camera settings that might help? I use a Nikon D100 most of the time.


Virgil
vt335 10 years ago
Anyone else can post in this topic. Go ahead and ask your questions. If I can help I will try. We all can't know everything, but someone else might know the answer to your question.


Virgil
admin
Damien Franco PRO 10 years ago
Virgil, if you could post what settings and camera mode you are currently using I think we could help out a little better.
vt335 10 years ago
Camera: Nikon D100
Exposure: 0.01 sec (1/100)
Aperture: f/6.3
Focal Length: 18 mm
ISO Speed: 320
Exposure Bias: 4/3 EV

Orientation: Horizontal (normal)
X-Resolution: 72 dpi
Y-Resolution: 72 dpi
Software: Adobe Photoshop Elements 5.0 Windows
Date and Time: 2008:04:03 20:48:20
Exposure Program: Shutter priority
Date and Time (Original): 2008:04:03 11:20:09
Date and Time (Digitized): 2008:04:03 11:20:09
Shutter Speed: 6643856/1000000
Maximum Lens Aperture: 36/10
Metering Mode: Pattern
Light Source: Cloudy weather
Sub-Second Time: 80
Sub-Second Time (Original): 80
Sub-Second Time (Digitized): 80
Color Space: sRGB
Sensing Method: One-chip colour area sensor
CFA Pattern: GREEN RED BLUE GREEN
Custom Rendered: 1
White Balance: Manual
Digital Zoom Ratio: 1/1
Focal Length In 35mm Film: 27
Compression: JPEG
XMP Date and Time (Original): 2008-04-03T11:20:09.80-04:00
Image Width: 3008 pixels
Image Height: 2000 pixels

Any advice you can give me will be appreciated. Thanks for responding.
MOD
Shrink1061 10 years ago
the problem to me looks to be one of exposure... where the metering has taken into account the light needed to expose the building, this has led to a blow out on the sky. Theres not a lot you can do about this other than do multiple exposures of a scene and combine them to HDR, or use a graduated mask in photoshop to blend the layers together.
admin
Damien Franco PRO 10 years ago
I think your problem is shooting in shutter priority. You don't have to go to full on manual, but I suggest underexposing. The problem is that your camera is trying to get as full a dynamic range as it can render given the settings you provide, only most digital cameras can't record that much dynamic range. You'll end up with either blown out highlights like we see above, or dark shadows with no detail.

There are several ways to try and combat this issue.

First, don't aim your camera towards the sun, even on a cloudy day.

Second, you can try bracket exposure and choose the best image.

Third, the time of day really affects how these things turn out. Landscape photographers battle this by only photographing at sunrise and sunset.

Fourth, you can meter for the sky, then use a flash to fill in your subject.

As always experimentation is key!
vt335 Posted 10 years ago. Edited by vt335 (member) 10 years ago
Thank you for the advice, I'll print this out and keep it for reference because I am going to get out today even though it is still cloudy. Again, thank you very much. As far as HDR, I found that one can do HDR in Corel Paintshop Pro X2. Looks like I will be spending $100.00 for this sometime in the near future. Photoshop Elelments 5(which is what I have) will not do HDR as far as I know.



Virigl
admin
Damien Franco PRO 10 years ago
You don't have to wait until it's not cloudy. In fact the clouds create great light for outdoor photography. What I was trying to saying is that solid clouds will try to become white in your camera's eyes.
MOD
Shrink1061 10 years ago
it also look in that photo, like your white balance is slightly off. Perhaps near a fluorescent setting. Try tweaking it in raw to daylight or set a manual colour temperature to get rid of that slightly pink hue.

you can also use raw conversion to your advantage, in photoshop for example, you could under expose the image maybe half a stop, to bring the sky down, but bring out the low lights and darker colours without over brightening the sky.
vt335 10 years ago
Here in KY it has been cloudy most days for the past 4-5 months. We are ready for an extended period of sunshine. What you have said about cloudy days is good for me to keep in mind. I appreciate and value your advice and will keep it in mind.


Thank You,

Virgil
foregoing cactus [deleted] 10 years ago
Shoot RAW and bracket. Expose for the sky and you should avoid the blown highlights. Then post process to bring out the darker tones.
vt335 10 years ago
Thanks to everyone for the comments.
MOD
shutterguy 10 years ago
vt335 says:
Camera: Nikon D100
Exposure: 0.01 sec (1/100)
Aperture: f/6.3
Focal Length: 18 mm
ISO Speed: 320
Exposure Bias: 4/3 EV

see the settings there i had the same problem at first when i shot with the d50 your ev is 4/3
tyr turning the ev down
gigantic rock [deleted] 10 years ago
As far as in camera goes, a Polarizer may have helped, while a Graduated Neutral Density Filter would help on future shots if the sky is level and is contained in the top portion of the shot.
vt335 10 years ago
Thanks Wolf,

I do have a polarizing filter, but I did not think of using it on a cloudy day. I will experiment with that next time.
Pablo 57 10 years ago
I would expose using the sky, lock the exposure, than reframe the photo. This has always been a problem for me. Exposure bracketing will help you learn.
vt335 Posted 10 years ago. Edited by vt335 (member) 10 years ago
Thank you Pablo. You all have given me great advice.
gigantic rock [deleted] 10 years ago
The only problem is that by exposing for the sky, you risk losing the detail in the foreground as it turns into a silhouette from under exposure.

Another alternative (and I do it this way with a handheld light meter) is to meter for the sky, then meter for the subject. By picking a number exactly in the middle you have the best of both worlds. By leaning more towards the meter reading for the sky, you can avoid too much silhouetting, but still maintain detail in the sky. And the reverse for the other way.
vt335 Posted 10 years ago. Edited by vt335 (member) 10 years ago
Thanks for the great advice Wolf. I have been pricing handheld meters.
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