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Haiti

admin
worldwidewandering 2:16am, 1 October 2006

from Seo2

Capital: Port-au-Prince
Languages: Creole, French
Ethnic Groups: Black 95%, white and mixed 5%
Religions: Roman Catholic 80%, Baptist 10%, Pentecostal 4%
Monetary Unit: Gourde (HTG 332)

from derAmialtebloede

Large Map

Haiti (Haïti in French; Ayiti in Haitian Creole; Hayti in nineteenth century English), officially the Republic of Haiti, occupies one-third of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, and also includes many smaller islands such as La Gonâve, La Tortue (Tortuga), Les Cayemites, Île de Anacaona, and La Grande Caye. The uninhabited island of Navasse is claimed both by Haiti and the United States. 'Ayiti' (Haiti) being the indigenous Taíno name for the island means "Land of Mountains". Haiti shares the island of Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic. The total area of Haiti is 27,750 km² (10,714 sq mi) and its capital is Port-au-Prince.

A former French colony, Haiti was to become the first independent black republic, and the only nation ever to have formed from a successful slave revolt. Haiti became the second non-native country in the Americas (after the United States) when it declared its independence on January 1, 1804.

Haiti has recently undergone a state of transition following an uprising, which forced President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to resign on February 29, 2004. He had been re-elected in 2000 in an election which several parties boycotted due to disputes with the vote-counting of a previous parliamentary election. René Préval was elected president in his place on February 7, 2006, and took office in May...more
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On flickr:
Haiti
Caribbean
Caribbean Landscape
Fotos Caribe
Caribbean perspective
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Other Forums:
Lonely Planet Thorntree: Haiti
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worldwidewandering 9 years ago

from Mike O'C

waterfront view-cap haitien
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Puerto Principe
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from The Travelling Beaver

Loto Center in Haiti
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from The Travelling Beaver

Canadian Embassy in Haiti
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from The Travelling Beaver

Haitian home
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House of the dead (Haitian Cemetary)
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from The Travelling Beaver

House of stones
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from The Travelling Beaver

Barbershop in a container
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from The Travelling Beaver

PAP - skyview
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from Mike O'C

This is the means of transportation around Haiti's populous areas. People cram into the back of a decorated pick up truck and pay a modest fee. When they want the driver to stop the "tap tap" hard on the side of the vehicle which then stops and they climb out.
admin
worldwidewandering 9 years ago

from Mike O'C

Deborah was a dental patient of mine during a week of volunteer dentistry in Cap Hatien, Haiti in August 2006
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from erin_maray

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from erin_maray

Haitian girl
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worldwidewandering 9 years ago

from More Altitude

I swam here. It was as glorious as it looks. In fact, gloriouser.

Haiti doesn't get much of a rep as a tourist hot-spot. Something to do with riots and coups and arbitrary violence.

Get out of Port-au-Prince and it's a gorgeous (if extremely impoverished) place. Ile de la Gonave was my idea of an island paradise. I would go back in a flash.

Ile de la Gonave, Haiti. April 2007.
admin
worldwidewandering 9 years ago

from More Altitude

Leaving Ile de la Gonave, our little plane flew low over the northern coast of the island, giving us a glorious view of what is, despite the poverty, one of the most idyllic little places I have ever set foot upon. I love the stillness of the water in this shot, and how the sea reflects the afternoon clouds in the top right corner of the frame. Makes my heart ache to be back in the tropics again.

Ile de la Gonave, Haiti. April 2007.
admin
worldwidewandering 9 years ago

from More Altitude

I had been sleeping badly since getting to Haiti- the result of a particularly nasty bout of jetlag from the hideous trip out from Melbourne- and the first few days on the mainland were not particularly good ones for me. After flying in to Ile de la Gonave, we drove up into the hills where some of our projects were located. There aren't any real hotels on La Gonave, certainly not outside Anse-a-Galets, so we stayed at the guest-house run by our project. I hit the sack about 9pm and was dead to the world.

But this morning I woke early and refreshed, well before dawn, around 5am. I enjoy getting up early in the tropics. It's before the heat of the day gets too unbearable, and the light is gentle, and it's usually a nice time to be up and about. Once we get into the swing of things on a monitoring visit like this one, I spend most of the day in and out of Land Cruisers, talking with village committees, visiting vegetable gardens, assessing project progress. Blah blah.

Being out in the village this early, you have a chance to take it easy and observe. Life begins more sedately out here than it does in the West. But by sunrise, people are up and about. Chickens are scratching in the dust. Women are collecting firewood. Pots are cooking. Goats are bleating. Men are setting up stalls for market. Children are collecting water to start the day off. There is life, but it's still calm. Voices chattering quietly, people exchanging greetings, and through it all, the crowing of roosters from peoples' yards.

After Port-au-Prince, La Gonave was heaven. I could walk around by myself, even before sunrise (heck, in PaP, you can't walk around by yourself in daylight). It was peaceful, it was idyllic... those of you who follow my photostream have heard me waffle on about this place before. So I had myself a really pleasant couple of hours, just me and the village- and my camera.

I took this shot just as the sun broke the line of trees behind me and kissed the front of the buildings. I really suggest you see this is Safari to get the most of the warm colour profile- it looks quite cool on Firefox.

Ile de la Gonave, Haiti. April 2007.
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