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Group Description

What is 'Urban Geometry'?

This group is for photographers who have a keen eye for, and an interest in, the underlying geometric composition of our urban environment.

What images are allowed in the pool?

Pool images should demonstrate that the photographer has made an effort to emphasise the underlying geometric composition of the photograph - the geometric shape or arrangement of the subject or subjects.

Basically, the geometry of the image must be a primary feature, not just a 'side effect'.
(More discussion of geometric composition can be found below...)

What are the posting rules?

1. You may only post 3 images to the group pool each day.
2. For each image you post to the group pool you must either:
* comment on one other photograph in the pool;
* mark two other photographs in the pool as favourites; or
* ask for one photograph that doesn't conform to the posting rules to be removed from the pool.

How should I leave a comment?

Please try to leave actual comments, perhaps about how effective you think the photographer's composition is, or why you chose to comment on that image.

After your comment, you may indicate that you found the image in the Urban Geometry group by simply stating:
"Seen in: Urban Geometry "

How do I ask for a photo to be removed?

Paste the thumbnail sized image of the photo you'd like to be removed to the discussion thread "This image doesn't fit!".
Please look through the thread first to make sure it hasn't already been submitted by another member and/or discussed already.

What's the competition about?

Each month we create a new discussion thread with the compositional theme for the month and some example templates showing the kinds of compositions that qualify for the competition. To participate in the competition, you should paste a medium sized image to the thread and the winner will be announced by the administrators roughly a week into the following month. Winning entries will be displayed in the competition thread and here!

Can I see the previous winners?

Sure, just follow this link to see all the images that have won so far.

What kinds of geometric compositions are there?

Well, we are always open to new forms and ideas, so this list is certainly not exclusive, but here is an attempt to categorise some of the different types of geometric composition:
Compositional geometry

This is an image in which the geometry is created by the photographer's composition of the image alone.



Subject geometry

This is an image in which the geometry is inherent in the subject of the image, but the photographer should have attempted to emphasise that geometry in some way.



Abstract geometry

This is an image in which there is a clear geometric form, but it is not obvious to the viewer what the subject of the image is.



Composite geometry

This is an image in which different subjects are positioned in such a way as to create or juxtapose different geometric shapes.



Intentional geometry

This is an image in which the geometry of the subject was intended by the architect, designer or planner. Again, the photographer should have taken steps to emphasise the geometry, perhaps even beyond that intended by the designer.



Discovered geometry

This is an image in which the photographer has discovered a geometric pattern or shape that no designer planned for or anticipated.



Implied geometry

This is an image in which the key points of interest in the composition themselves form a geometric shape when linked together, or where the geometry is provided by the negative space.



Complex geometry

This is an image in which there are a great many geometric shapes and forms in view.



Simple geometry

This is an image in which there are very few geometric shapes in view, perhaps even merely a line or a dot.



Artificial geometry

This is an image which has been enhanced in post-production to emphasise the geometry of the composition, perhaps by outlining or by cloning additional subjects or elements into the frame.



How does this relate to formal principles of composition?

One common way of thinking about formal composition is that it can consist of the following 6 elements:

* Line.
* Shape (two-dimensionality).
* Form (three-dimensionality).
* Texture.
* Pattern.
* Colour.

Simply put, for an image to qualify for the Urban Geometry pool, it *must* demonstrate at least one of the compositional elements Line, Shape or Pattern - and it must take as its subject part of the built environment around us.

Group Rules

What images are allowed in the pool?

Pool images should demonstrate that the photographer has made an effort to emphasise the underlying geometric composition of the photograph - the geometric shape or arrangement of the subject or subjects.

Basically, the geometry of the image must be a primary feature, not just a 'side effect'.
(More discussion of geometric composition is to be found below...)

What are the posting rules?

1. You may only post 3 images to the group pool each day.
2. For each image you post to the group pool you must either:
* comment on one other photograph in the pool.
* mark two other photographs in the pool as favourites.
* ask for one photograph that doesn't conform to the posting rules to be removed from the pool.

How should I leave a comment?
Please try to leave actual comments, perhaps about how effective you think the photographer's composition is, or why you chose to comment on that image.

After your comment, you may indicate that you found the image in the Urban Geometry group by simply stating:
"Seen in: Urban Geometry "

How do I ask for a photo to be removed?

Paste the thumbnail sized image of the photo you'd like to be removed to the discussion thread "This image doesn't fit!".
Please look through the thread first to make sure it hasn't already been submitted by another member and/or discussed already.

Enjoy the group and remember: the more you put in, the more you get out! :-)

Additional Info

  • Members can post 3 things to the pool each day.
  • Accepted content types: Photos, Images
  • Accepted safety levels: Safe
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