Josh_Wolf 12:55pm, 12 November 2012
Over the weekend, I had a chance to use Nikonsnapper's studio lots to shoot a model/photographer he knows (LHLinh)

I don't want to post these to the Icebox just yet but I'd still like some feedback on them if you wouldn't mind. I've never used studio lights before, nor have I had anybody model for me, so the whole thing was new and alien.

Please comment in this thread, not on the shots themselves

MOD
Lost In The Dream Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Lost In The Dream (moderator) 5 years ago
Linh 6

Technical:

By looking at the catch lights (camera left) it appears the light is too low and over too close to the model in relationship on the angle of the light.

The fill light is not balanced properly to the Key Light. The key light is also too hot... you can see it over exposing some of her hair strands
There is also a lot of unwanted reflection on the jacket...read up on "the family of angles" and Circ Pol filters.

There are a lot of flash spots on her skin that make her one cheek bone look like its going up to her temples, and it looks like she just got hit by something really flat ..(think of those highspeed slap in the face videos)

The background is not lit evenly, and you can see how the flash is hitting it camera right.

The model is a bit hunched and does not have hands.

Look at the unevenness in the eyes of the catch lights... how does it make the model appear? Makes her seem a bit "off" doesn't it...
MOD
Lost In The Dream Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Lost In The Dream (moderator) 5 years ago
Linh 1

Flash spots all over again...

and she is standing way too close to the background

also this is a studio shot, not an outdoor shoot... get her a brush, and some hair product.

The lighting is really flat here. Not a lot of depth or dimension.
MOD
Lost In The Dream 5 years ago
After looking at your other shots...I think the best thing for you to do Josh is to start with a black backdrop... Fleece is the best material.

work on lighting the model first, proper angles, proper mixed rations for key light to fill light... and a hair light.

Then start lighting the background as well.

My two cents.
Josh_Wolf 5 years ago
Breathes Life: Thanks for the pointers. We were looking for a black backdrop actually but didn't have anything to hand (this was all done at Nikonsnapper's home, in his dining room actually!)

Plenty to bear in mind for next time; clearly this isn't going to be something I can just pick up by example, I'll have to invest in some lighting of my own and practise.

One challenge we faced and I wonder if you might have an idea why - I was using a Canon 40D, Nikonsnapper was using a Nikon D700. We both had identical settings in camera (ISO 100, 1/250, f5.6), yet we both got completely different exposures. I mean it was literally a case of getting a correct exposure for me meant that Nikon's shots were way underexposed and vice versa. We couldn't figure out how there could be such a huge difference in exposure using the same setup all but for different cameras. Will be interesting to see how the couple of shots I took on a Bronica turned out as I was using my Canon to meter for them...
leesure PRO 5 years ago
On the top one above, wouldn't be too worried about the blown bits on the jacket from the hair light...they happen all the time...look in fashion magazines.
The oddness on her right cheek is off-putting. I'd suggest lowering the power of the camera left fill about a stop and and the same on the hair light...or moving the hair light further behind to keep it from hitting her cheek.
leesure PRO 5 years ago
Linh 4

This set up is working better for you. Primary reason is that you have moved the light closer, creating a larger, softer light source. That's evident in the reduction of hot spots on her face. That close 'wrap around' lighting also reduced or eliminated the need for the fill flash camera left. The shadows are much more in keeping with her expression.

This looks like 2 lights...one key camera right in a soft box nice and close, the other a hair light camera left.

Correct?

Also, f/16 has left too much definition in the BG. Lower the flashes and shoot at f/8 or lower to turn the BG wrinkles into a pleasing abstract.
leesure PRO 5 years ago
In general, my suggestion to anyone starting to beta feel for studio light is to start with one light. Change modifiers, move it around, move it closer and farther away and see the difference all that makes. Then add a reflector. Do all the same changes and look at those. Only then add a 2nd light. Try all the permutations of that...fill, hair, spot it, grid it, clamshell (overhead and under the chin). THEN add the 3rd light and open the possibilities.

But master the one light first.
Josh_Wolf 5 years ago
leesure: Spot on with the lighting setup Lee.

One problem we had was that myself and Nikonsnapper were both shooting Linh but for some reason, our exposures were completely different despite using the same in-camera settings and flash set up. That's why on some of the shots (this one included), I had to stop right down to control the light. No idea why it happened, but Nikonsnapper shot the same scene with his aperture opened up to around 5.6 (as I'd liked to have done) and got a correct exposure, but mine were massively over exposing so I had to close right down. I used a Canon 40D, he used a Nikon D700 - apart from that, everything was the same. Weird! Will be interesting to see how my shots on the Bronica turned out as I was using my Canon to meter for them...

Thanks for the advice, I appreciate you taking the time.
leesure PRO 5 years ago
Incredible amounts of valuable info here: www.zarias.com/white-seamless-tutorial-part-1-gear-space/
Josh_Wolf 5 years ago
leesure: That website looks very useful, thanks Lee
leesure PRO 5 years ago
MOD
Lost In The Dream 5 years ago
Difference in Exposures: Sounds like It is quite possible your camera was on auto ISO.
leesure PRO 5 years ago
Not sure what to tell you on the Canon v Nikon issue. The shutter speed should be relatively immaterial when you're that stopped down, so you're left with ISO and aperture. Did you check to see if the Canon was on auto-ISO?
Josh_Wolf Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Josh_Wolf (member) 5 years ago
It was definitely set to ISO 100, not auto, and it was mine that was over exposing so it can't have been Nikon's camera set to auto ISO either...

The difference was huge too. I might expect a little difference from different lenses/cameras, but mine were overexposing by a good 2 stops compared to Nikon's, both set up exactly the same. When I could, I turned down the power of the lights for my shots but as we were sharing the lights, sometimes I just had to stop down to get the exposure right.

There a couple of shots of mine at 160, but I know I did that myself - I had Provia 160 in the Bronica so was metering for that and taking test shots.
leesure PRO 5 years ago
Too funny...just posted my reply and saw Breathes Life's. great minds.....
MOD
Lost In The Dream 5 years ago
Josh_Wolf:Can you put up a RAW file of the over exposed shot at 100?
Josh_Wolf 5 years ago
Breathes Life:

I'll have a look for one later, I may have deleted them on the spot but I'll have a look for you and put up a link if I have one
MOD
Lost In The Dream 5 years ago
leesure:

Yes indeed :D
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