thorsten198 2:13am, 18 November 2012
Today I was shooting my brother’s little daughter (almost a year and already posing like a super model) indoor at f/4.0 1/125 ISO 400, I had one SB 800 in a white reflector brollie as key and one SB 900 in a shoot through as fill, both flashes have been geled with original Nikon TN-A1 orange filters for balance to the ambient.

When opening the images at home in Capture NX, I realized a big difference in colour temperature, the shoot through was dramatically cooler than the reflector brollie, now I’m a kind of lost.
The reflector was mainly on ¼ power the other on ½ power. I simply changed the distance to balance the light.

What could be the reason for the difference in colour temp?
I always considered the Nikon filters as overpriced crap and use Lee filters, but today I simply used the Nikon filters that come with the flash.
Is it the filters or do you have any other idea?

Regards
Thorsten
RB (Bob) Jones 5 years ago
What about the difference in the umbrellas? A reflective surface vs a shoot through. Try an experiment to see if the umbrellas introduced the colour difference?
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
Not looking at any other variables, the differene in power of the two units will do it.
Think about it, only the unit that contributes most to the ambient will "balance", when you add another unit with less power, the situation will become tricky.

The flash with the most power will be cooler simply because the color will be less saturated.

Try shooting at a white wall with varying power levels, you will find that the shots with low power will show more/warmer color!

The more powerful your flash becomes, the more the color of the filter will go towards white.
thorsten198 Posted 5 years ago. Edited by thorsten198 (member) 5 years ago
Yes Alfred, this makes sense!

So what are others doing in this situation, gel one flash full CTO the other flash 1/2 CTO?
I knew about the fact that dimmed light is always warmer than normal, so no big surprise this happens with the flashes too, but it is like one flash would be colored and the other would be bare!

Any suggestions how to solve this problem?
Will do some experiments tomorrow I guess.
aperture-priority Posted 5 years ago. Edited by aperture-priority (member) 5 years ago
Were you using CLS/AWL to trigger your strobes? If so, then did you set the commander not to contribute, if not then the commander would need a gel too.

If you had successfully matched the ambient colour temperature with your gels then power difference is not a factor (others will probably say that strobes change colour /w power, which is true, but the effect is very small especially with SpeedLights).

Some cheaper softboxes have a distinct magenta cast, you can check your modifiers by shooting white wall lit by them alone in FLASH white balance and comparing the images. This doesn't sound like your issue.

You say you shot indoors, what type of lighting was the ambient. If you gel for incandescent light and have strong Sun light coming in though a window; you will have a source of cool temperature light in the mix as well.

Can you show us an image that at least shows the ambient lighting?
thorsten198 5 years ago


I used RF-602 triggers to fire the flashes.
The ambient light was from dimmed bulbs only (no light mix), the ambient was not visible contributing to the lighting of the little girl, it was already dark outside, no daylight at all.
The modifiers have been one white reflector brollie and one shoot through, both 105cm and from the same manufacturer.

Not quite sure, but maybe the different power output will have influence on the colour temp (I will test this).
Another thing came to my mind – left hand, between the shoot through and the girl there was a white piece of furniture (like a low table or so where the audio stuff is resting)
Could it be possible that this white thing is providing white light reflection to the exposure, even the light source is geled orange?
CC filters don't 'colour' the light - they absorb light. In the case of an orange looking filter they are absorbing cyan/blue.

The difference in output of a flash between ¼ power the other on ½ power will have no colour difference affect, only a brightness difference.

The problem you are seeing is possibly the result of the filter not fitted correctly, or daylight contamination.
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
My English is insufficient to get in to a semantic pissing contest over color correction.

Of course both Bill and Commercial Photographer are technically 100% correct, your issue however is not about being technically correct, but it is all about perception.

If you use the same gel on both flashes you will, as Bill correctly pointed out, get the same color throughout the scene, but the saturation of the color is vastly different, this difference in saturation will make the single color, which you produced by filtering blue light out of the scene, look brownish red in dark areas and light orange to yellow in well lit areas.

Now you can be technically correct or you can make your picture perceptional pleasing by using a lighter or no filter on the fill flash, I rather have a blue cast in the shadows than in the highlights, but that is up to you!

I sometimes even use a 1/4 CTG on the fill flash, try it you might like it!
Semantic pissing contests apart, theres no colour saturation issue present. The colour correction filters merely REMOVE the unnecessary colour. They DON'T ADD colour which at brighter levels might even be considered more ...pissy.

If your filter looks Orange it is removing blue/cyan. THAT colour is removed in whatever quantity is present despite the intensity.

Technically correct is pictorially and perceptually perfect in this instance.
Alfredk PRO 5 years ago
I'll recommend you take a CTO gel and experiment with it!
Really?!

I'll recommend you read through this website which creates colour conversion filters for every level of colour correction required and find where it states that different light intensity requires an amount of different colour correction level: (hint: you won't find it).
www.leefilters.com/lighting/technical-list.html

Then, turn on two matched tungsten lights in the same room in your house and balance the colour. Then, turn one off to obtain half the intensity and see that your colour balance doesn't need changing. Alternatively, try it with a colour meter.

Would I need differing filters to convert 80Ws, 160Ws, 320Ws, 400Ws, 1K, 2K, 3K, 6K .. 5600°K flash to 3200°K Tungsten...? No.

Intensity plays no part in colour correction in the same way that closing or opening your aperture doesn't impart a colour shift either.
RB (Bob) Jones 5 years ago
Commercial know-it-all there is a difference if you are looking at a light source such as a tungsten light giving off light at 2800° and the light cast through a filter over a light source. The intensity of light going through the filter will cause it to appear lighter or darker. This will not change the colour temperature but it will cause an apparent colour change because of the exposure.

Take a dark blue filter on your speedlite and expose it too a white wall at full power. Record the colour the wall appears to be. Then do the same at 1/4 intensity and the colour on the wall will be different. Now if you use a colour meter will the reading be different or is it just a perceived difference? I know that the camera will record each as different colours because of the intensity.
Sportsbob knob


I don't see the point in spreading misunderstanding.. but you carry on.

The intensity of light going through the filter will cause it to appear lighter or darker. This will not change the colour temperature but it will cause an apparent colour change because of the exposure.


So you are now photographing lightsources without colour correcting for them or compensating for brightness..?!!

Take a dark blue filter on your speedlite and expose it too a white wall at full power. Record the colour the wall appears to be. Then do the same at 1/4 intensity and the colour on the wall will be different.


And what part of that includes any colour correction rather than just gelling a background? - None.

If you colour correct for the blue then every intensity of that wall will be neutral.

Now if you use a colour meter will the reading be different or is it just a perceived difference?,


The colour meter will give you EXACTLY the same reading EVERY time. And you still haven't corrected it. If you did, then every intensity of illumination would provide a neutral rendition.

I know that the camera will record each as different colours because of the intensity.


And where was the colour correction you added again??? Oh, you didn't add any. If you had, they would all be neutral.
MOD
Nionyn_ PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Nionyn_ (moderator) 5 years ago
For anyone who is finding anything in this thread to be a source of annoyance I would recommend reading The Little Book Of Calm. Not because it will calm you down but because it is infinitely more annoying than anything in this thread, and will put things in a different perspective. I almost threw it across the room before I'd got half way through it.

As you were.
;-)
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
I always thought that a neural density filter was to get everything in the scene neutral ?

Regular filters will give a color cast but color correction filters will simply make everything neutral :)) and naturally the saturation will not be affected since we are only taking colors away.


hahahahahahaahahahahahaha
I never heard so much BS and I am not absolutely sure anymore why I am even writing this, please help me.

I just put a full CTO on my flash and guess what, the entire room is neutral now....SHIT

ROFLMAO

Hey Commercial Photographer, may I suggest to pick up a camera and shoot some pictures?
Commercial Photographer Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Commercial Photographer (member) 5 years ago


hahahahahahaahahahahahaha
I never heard so much BS and I am not absolutely sure anymore why I am even writing this, please help me.


Wow.. you've really lost it.

I can help with photography, but to help with your problem you really need see a psychiatrist.

To convert colour from one colour temperature to another, only one colour conversion pack is needed regardless of intensity - whether you can grasp that - or not.

Hey Commercial Photographer, may I suggest to pick up a camera and shoot some pictures?


Which of the 70,000+ online paid for images would you like to see? I understand you're particularly fond of self-portraits.. sorry, I don't do those.
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
Jesus, stop it, I just neutralized myself!
:))

I do appreciate your kind suggestion of helping me, but I hate to say, there is no help for me!
Somebody needed to.
MOD
Nionyn_ PRO 5 years ago
Are we there yet?
Alfredk PRO 5 years ago
There where?
:))

I just saw Elvis, he is still alive!
Are we there yet?


No, I don't think so.

I think we should wait for all the accruing evidence to contradict what I've been trying to explain, or for thorsten198 to reveal that one of the correction filters had fallen off his flash.

I'm looking forward to more.
thorsten198 Posted 5 years ago. Edited by thorsten198 (member) 5 years ago
I think we should wait for all the accruing evidence to contradict what I've been trying to explain, or for thorsten198 to reveal that one of the correction filters had fallen off his flash.


It’s so embarrassing, but this is already close to the truth 

I used this bouncer thingy on the SB800 for fully fill the shoot through brollie, you know how the Nikon filter is used on the SB 800?
The filter foil has to be folded 90° and the one end is inserted into the flashhead, the whole thing is rather lose.
I found out, that the filter was at the lower edge of the flash tube not plain, there was light spill sideways and due to the diffuser cap, it was spread all over the brollie.
So I can say, that was the reason for the difference in colour temp, it’s was all MY fault, photographer malfunction!
SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos} [deleted] Posted 5 years ago. Edited by SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos} (member) 5 years ago
I'm no expert, but I was curious, and I needed to test my new PWIIIs anyway. So here's the set up: D700, WB on flash. The door is white. One SB900 on a stand camera right, gelled with a Rogue lavender (because I FELT like it), which has a light loss of 3.5 stops. I ran the flash through different power settings at different exposures. The camera was hand-held (so forgive the tilt in a few of them), but I was in the same place. There's a tungsten light on above my head, but it's on in all of them (you can see it in the reflection). Have a look. In this thread, I am posting the 1/60ss images, but I did 1/125 and 1/30 as well, and they're in my photostream.

Full power:
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/84432786@N05/8198819742/in/photostream]

Half power:
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/84432786@N05/8197727415/in/photostream]

Quarter power:
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/84432786@N05/8197727229/in/photostream]

And one sixteenth power:
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/84432786@N05/8198819210/in/photostream]

Thanks, Nionyn for the formatting help!
thorsten198 5 years ago
You know, if you cannot view your shots on location, you don't have any chance, I only realized this afterwards on the computer and I was really pissed!
It was just something private, I can repeat this shooting any time, but I have learned something - I will not go to do something like this anymore without having my laptop with me, the best would be to shoot directly connected to the laptop!
MOD
Nionyn_ PRO 5 years ago
To post photos from your photostream in a thread click on 'Want to format your reply?' beneath the text box (where you type a post) for instructions on this and other formatting goodies. :-)
SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos}:
I'm no expert, but.....


What do your examples illustrate exactly?

Something along the lines of this perhaps....?

Take a dark blue filter on your speedlite and expose it too a white wall at full power. Record the colour the wall appears to be. Then do the same at 1/4 intensity and the colour on the wall will be different.



And what part of that includes any colour correction rather than just gelling a background? - None.

If you colour correct for the blue then every intensity of that wall will be neutral.


Gelling a door for effect is different to colour correcting a light source because somewhere down the line the 'colour correcting' stage needs to be applied.

I'm not so sure that a Rogue Lavender is even classified as CC filter..
www.leefilters.com/lighting/colour-details.html#058&f...
SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos} [deleted] 5 years ago
Hi Commercial Photographer: My little effort may not tell you anything you didn't already know. All I was trying to see was whether the color intensity of my filter changed according to the power output of the flash.
Commercial Photographer Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Commercial Photographer (member) 5 years ago
That it will alright, especially when you have no idea of where the tonal values should lie or any colours in the image to reference to.

Imagine the full exposure image being the correct colour with all that Lavender removed and neutralised.. at the same settings, the other images will just fall in line but be darker. They won't become 'more Lavender', they will become 'more darker'.

At least you made an effort.

To try and clarify the issue.. the opposite to Lavender is a Yellow/Green mix. As your image gets lighter - does it change colour and become more Yellow/Green or does it just become a lighter Lavender?

I think we should wait for all the accruing evidence to contradict what I've been trying to explain, or for thorsten198 to reveal that one of the correction filters had fallen off his flash.


It’s so embarrassing, but this is already close to the truth


:)

It happens.
SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos} [deleted] Posted 5 years ago. Edited by SaraKellyPhoto {Intrepid Photos} (member) 5 years ago
Commercial P: I think understand the question, and I'm getting there. The threshold question to my mind was the one I answered last night. (Which seems to suggest that I can get a different color intensity out of my gels by altering my flash output, even when holding exposure the same by adjusting aperture and shutter speed. This is news to me and interesting.) My plan is to try it again tonite with two lights at different intensities which I will then correct in post. I will probably use a CTO since I don't want to bother neutralizing lavender.
My plan is to try it again tonite with two lights at different intensities which I will then correct in post.I will probably use a CTO since I don't want to bother neutralizing lavender.

Even better.
aperture-priority 5 years ago
Firstly I wasn't referring to the effect Alfred was implying at all. The colour shift I mentioned was the small one exhibited by strobes when the output power is adjusted. This is most prominent on studio type units that use voltage controlled power control. As I said this shift is small and only noticeable on poorer quality lights.

Secondly, all this talk about colour shifts and intensity would be better explained as intensity, saturation or, brightness. The hue of a colour is the component that doesn't change with intensity, saturation or, brightness. That same hue component is the same component that allows a colour correction filter to match dissimilar colour temperature or tint light sources.

Light hue is no more related to saturation than pitch is to volume of a sound.

Obviously we need to match the intensity of the light sources to the lighting levels required for the image. I don't normally refer to this part of the process as a colour adjustment, it's just setting the lights to the level I want.

Seems to me that some of the arguments here are conflating orthogonal physical concepts. Light has intensity and spectral components, changing either changes the perceived colour but they are independent. For example something reflecting red light can be bright (light red) or dark (dark red) but it cannot be blue.

Bill.
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
As I mentioned in my first reply to you and Commercial photographer, theoretically you are both correct!
Do I have to repeat this again?

My point is simple that perceptional, saturation of a color can and will have a huge impact.

My experience has been that if I gel the fill light the same as the key light, the saturation of the fill will be way too much and it will not look good even if it is technically correct!

For a casual viewer of a picture, the saturation of a particular color has a huge impact since it will not be immediately obvious that we are talking about the same color and without being able to measure the actual numbers it will appear to them as differing colors.

Tell Joe Doe, who has no knowledge of color theory, that the blues in the above examples are all the same and see what he will tell you!
aperture-priority 5 years ago
So if you don't gel the key light, do you have to gel the other lights to compensate for "saturation" differences?
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
Ohhh come on Bill don't play word games with me!
I gel the key, but I gel either less on the fill or I gel for a entirely different balance on the fill!
aperture-priority 5 years ago
OK, let me try again. BTW no games implied, trying to ask a genuine question.

When you have an un-gelled key light and a fill at half the key intensity. What gel do you use to "balance" the fill light?
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
If my key is un-gelled why would I balance the fill?

As mentioned above, I often gel with a full CTO and then use a 1/2 or 1/4 CTG for the fill, it will give me less dark magenta spots in the shadow areas. I prefer "dirty lighting"
It's a perceptional thing and is not correct by color theory principals!

P.S. WB in camera is set to Tungsten!
aperture-priority 5 years ago
OK, I think I understand now.

You are talking about gelling for creative effect rather than light source colour correcting in the accepted manner that CC gels are designed for.

Seems to me that your original post was no more than a thread hijack to talk about your taste in gelling for effect rather than the OPs original attempt to match light colour temperatures and camera white balance for a neutral representation of neutral tones.

It also seems to me that the posts above about classical colour correction (or unimportant technical stuff as you deem it) got the OP to a conclusion that he had a technical error with a mis-fitted gel, rather than attempts to twist colour theory in some sort of pseudo-science.

No complaints here about discussions of creative lighting effects, but equally,no place for them in this thread.
Alfredk PRO 5 years ago
I was strictly talking color correction for light sources, but I can see now that your brain does not except anything other than what you can read in Wikipedia!

I am sick of your stupid games Bil!

Over and out!
epatsellis 5 years ago
Filter issues aside, this highlights the need to proof on site. I don't know what camera the OP shoots iwth, but I use a D2x with a WT-2 and an Ipad with Shuttersnitch, you spot issues like this immediately when you can actually see what you're doing. EyeFi cards work with Shuttersnitch as well, for the wireless transmitter impaired folks amongst us.
thorsten198 5 years ago


You are right - but unfortunately it's not always possible.
When I visit my brother Saturday afternoon, then I don't want to show up with heaps of equipment, two lightstands with brollies have been already the max here!

regards
Thorsten
Commercial Photographer Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Commercial Photographer (member) 5 years ago
thorsten198:

I used this bouncer thingy on the SB800 for fully fill the shoot through brollie, you know how the Nikon filter is used on the SB 800?
The filter foil has to be folded 90° and the one end is inserted into the flashhead, the whole thing is rather lose.


Use the flip-over wide angle adapter to hold the filter in place.

.

I was strictly talking color correction for light sources,


!! Strictly talking color correction for light sources.. BS !!

This is what you were talking:
Not looking at any other variables, the differene in power of the two units will do it.
Think about it, only the unit that contributes most to the ambient will "balance", when you add another unit with less power, the situation will become tricky.

The flash with the most power will be cooler simply because the color will be less saturated.


Backtracking and squeeling more like !!

Lets try this another way.

Generally, shooting with two speedlights is easy, no matter what power output you use. Speedlights have a nominal colour temperature. They have a colour temperature of 5500°K at 1/1 power and the same colour temperature of 5500°K at 1/4 power. You will see no difference in colour when using them at these, or any other output settings. They are colour matched.

If you need to match your flash to tungsten at a different colour temperature, you need an appropriate ColourCorrection filter like Thorsten (thorsten198) used.

A full ColourTemperatureOrange will adjust by -3300°K making your speedlight warmer looking
A half ColourTemperatureOrange will adjust by -2700°K making your speedlight LESS warmer looking

Mixing these ColourCorrection filters on your speedlights gives a technical and visual colour imbalance.

If you were wanting a matched colour balance using these different filters, you have now screwed it up.

No matter what output levels you set, you will never get the colour temperature of the two speedlights to be the same.

I hope that eventually helps.

The flash with the most power will be cooler simply because the color will be less saturated.


No it won't.

My turn, with just cause.. ROFLMAO

.
camcleat Posted 5 years ago. Edited by camcleat (member) 5 years ago
I may regret this, but...

"They have a colour temperature of 5500°K at 1/1 power and the same colour temperature of 5500°K at 1/4 power. You will see no difference in colour when using them at these, or any other output settings. They are colour matched."

Why then do Einsteins have a constant color mode (*)?

It's my understanding that electronically, they are essentially similar to speedlights. I would think if they need some sort of color balancing across the power range, speedlights do as well.

Are you saying that the smaller, shoe based speedlights already have that color matching circuitry? If so, got a technical reference?

(*) from PCB web site:

"Two distinct operation modes are available from the rear panel: the Constant Color mode and the Action mode. In Constant Color mode, the emitted color temperature is held constant at 5600ºK (+/- 50ºK at any power setting or input voltage). The flash duration ranges from 1/540 second (t.1) at full power to 1/1700 second (t.1) at half power to 1/9,000 second (t.1) at the lowest power setting. In Action mode, the flash duration is minimized for maximum action stopping capability where absolute color consistency is secondary to motion freezing. At half power in Action mode, the flash duration is approximately 1/2000 second (t.1) and the color temperature is approximately 5750º K. In this mode, the color temperature rises as power is reduced."
Factually, Speedlights are not that consistent, however, for sanity reasons, I don't think I'd like to bring any further variables into the discussion as the ones already on the table are causing more than enough issues ;-)
.
thorsten198 Posted 5 years ago. Edited by thorsten198 (member) 5 years ago
@ Commercial Photographer

Thanks for your explanations, but here I’d like to disagree.

Use the flip-over wide angle adapter to hold the filter in place.

Do this with the SB 800 and after a few pops the filter throws blisters, I had this already – thanks.
I will simply patch some Velcro at the SB 800 and use the Lee filters next time.

Anyway, I have already tested some stuff being “discussed” here in this thread, or should I say argued about?

To summarize these (field) tests:
Power of the flash doesn’t have (visible) influence on the color temp.

Regards
Thorsten
epatsellis 5 years ago
"You are right - but unfortunately it's not always possible.
When I visit my brother Saturday afternoon, then I don't want to show up with heaps of equipment, two lightstands with brollies have been already the max here!

regards
Thorsten "

An ipad and travel router/rechargeable battery isn't all that big now, is it? I find it invaluable when immediately after the shoot you can review with the client and pick the "first cut" images.
mjkzz (a.k.a zwdeal) 5 years ago
Speedlites tends to be blueish at very low power level (the lowest), but the difference between 1/4 and 1/1 power level should be very small to have actual effect.

Could intensity play a role in gelling a speedlite when it is so intense that it is out of sensor's dynamic range? ie, some color channel gets clipped, thus changing what is being recorded by camera, not actualy light conditions.

Just curious.
Rangefindergeneral 5 years ago
Can I use a straw colour filter..??? I think its a nicer colour match to my Bowens..
So if I've got this right at full power I need a full cut of straw and at 1/2 power a 1/2 cut and so on..????
That sounds right to me..
So if I've got this right at full power I need a full cut of straw and at 1/2 power a 1/2 cut and so on..????
That sounds right to me..


It's wrong.
Rangefindergeneral Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Rangefindergeneral (member) 5 years ago
have you considered light as a wave as well as a particle..????

I think we should all consider what we have said here for a while and just shot B/W for a week or so...
Alfredk PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Alfredk (member) 5 years ago
SInce power levels have no effect at all on the color balance and saturation can be ignored all together, all you have to do is put the gel on the flash, you don't even have to turn it on!
:))
RB (Bob) Jones 5 years ago
Time for the people to put the gels on and take some test shots of a white wall. Should be easy - right.

As they say the proof is in the pudding.

Have fun.
..Do you still think:
"at full power I need a full cut of straw and at 1/2 power a 1/2 cut and so on.." ?

...or can't you read?

To summarize these (field) tests:
Power of the flash doesn’t have (visible) influence on the color temp.


Thanks Thorsten, thats how it works.
thorsten198 Posted 5 years ago. Edited by thorsten198 (member) 5 years ago
I guess the main problem of this discussion is the misunderstanding about mixing up two different things.

Painting a door blue, a wall red or whatever with gels has simply nothing to do with color correction for WB, that’s another meadow like we would say here.
The similarity is that both painting the door or doing colour correction rely one BASIC principle and that is filters CUT colour, they don't ADD it.
Alfredk PRO 5 years ago
Yes there is a misunderstanding, to color correct or place a cast on a scene with a CTO,CTB,CTG or with any other color is the exact same principal. there is no difference in coloring or color correcting!

Using any type of filter is "color correcting" the scene!
thorsten198 5 years ago
Anyway,

thank you all for your participation - that's it.
Yes there is a misunderstanding, to color correct or place a cast on a scene with a CTO,CTB,CTG or with any other color is the exact same principal. there is no difference in coloring or color correcting!

Using any type of filter is "color correcting" the scene!


"Yes there is a misunderstanding - there is no difference" ?

Alfred, how far back was it that you were not wanting to get involved with a semantic pissing contest, yet here you are clinging onto some wild ambiguous and pointless justification so far fetched you just met yourself coming back?

Colour Correcting a scene implies providing a matched lighting colour to the one that your camera's colour balance is set for. The clue is in the name "correct". There is no cast. It is neutral. Both match. You ADD the same custom designed ColourCorrection filters to your otherwise matching lights - whatever output level they're set to - to obtain a neutral colour match. A balance, ColourCorrected. Correct. ✓

Colouring a scene is what you were proposing to do when you were mixing Full CTO with Full output flash and Half CTO with Half output flash, or some other concoction, then adding in some 1/4 CTG. Just like painting by numbers, where nothing really matters, colours don't match, you guessed, Wrong. ✘

There is a very obvious difference.

Yes, you put a coloured piece of gel on a flash, so its exactly the same principle. So I apologise.. you're perfectly correct. ✘
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