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any ideas on lighting setup on this

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seanmophoto says:

Any ideas on this...i've been wanting to try this type of setup forever...kind of the dan winters, wired mag cover look

www.keatleyphoto.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/ida_...

I'm thinking softbox or beauty dish high in front of model

then a strobe fired right into the wall behind subject?
9:48AM, 2 October 2009 PDT (permalink)

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OregonVelo is a group administrator OregonVelo says:

I think you are right on the model light.
Then on the back there is a gridded spot that is gelled to give the color on the gray seemless.
Also there is a bit of burning that is going on for the vinnetting. Check out the bottom right and you can see the post production.
Originally posted 107 months ago. (permalink)
OregonVelo (a group admin) edited this topic 107 months ago.

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seanmophoto says:

you think thats gray seamless?
hadn't thought of that
gray supposedly is the best for gels right?
107 months ago (permalink)

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OregonVelo is a group administrator OregonVelo says:

that is what I hear. I only know what I have read and seen though.
107 months ago (permalink)

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seanmophoto says:

I have tried repeatedly and never had much luck with gel'ing backgrounds...I must be doing something wrong
107 months ago (permalink)

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LukeOlsen is a group administrator LukeOlsen says:

gels... yummy. Was that the setup you were using when you tried the gels?
107 months ago (permalink)

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OregonVelo is a group administrator OregonVelo says:

Mastering gels is a whole nother skill set. You find out everything that doesn't work before you find out what does.
107 months ago (permalink)

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John Keel / Photos by JK says:

John Keatley's lighting is fantastic and I know he tends to use four or five lights in his set ups. If you scroll through his blog you can find a rare mention on his lighting and the occasional set up photo.
107 months ago (permalink)

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Strober says:

Standard portraiture would suggest not puting a strobe high in front, but on the side instead at face or chest level. A high strobe can tend to create what is called racoon eyes where there is dark over the eye shadowed by the eye brow. The classic side angle is from the light's perspective just off enough that the far side of the nose is not visible, but as much of the far cheek visible as possible. This will create increased depth due to the fall-off shadow effect creating more shape. This is just a standard guide but not a rule. Don't necessarily let standards get in the way of your creativity. I do find that a second subject strobe, high and 180 degrees off of the main strobe can create nice highligts. In my studio, I've recently shifted to a 4 and a half light setup with rear projected (indirect) highlight strobes on both sides and above rear facing out, and a main light to use on either side. And sometimes I use a high-intensity RGB variable LED stage light to highlight the background, or create colored highlights in the hair from directly behind.
Originally posted 107 months ago. (permalink)
Strober edited this topic 107 months ago.

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