Discussions (3,817)

A few focusing thoughts...

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

I don’t know how many folks are using this technique. It was mentioned in the tips thread but I have the feeling it got lost. Plus there are a number of folks new to DSLRs who are jumping on the bandwagon with the D90 that will absorb any good idea.

In the olden days we would set the shutter speed dial, twist the aperture ring, and focus using the lens focusing ring. In the D90 (as with most digital cameras today) both the exposure and focusing locks are tied to the shutter release button. This was also true of my D70s. One of the things I learned very early on from an old Nikonians podcast was to disconnect these two functions.

So on my D90…
I set Auto Focus to AF-C (AF-Continuous) by pushing the AF button on top of the camera (next to the screen) while turning the main command dial button.
Next I set f4: Assign AE-L/AF-L button to AF-ON.
Lastly I set c1: Shutter-Release button AE-L to ON.

So I use my thumb to press the AE-L/AF-L button. As long as I hold down the button the camera will focus. The minute I lift my thumb it stops. Way cool. It’s like having AF-S and AF-C combo. The other thing this does (with the last step) is to lock the exposure when I press the shutter release part way.

Note there is a drawback for those that want the audio confirmation when the subject is in focus (aka the beep), when you set Auto Focus to AF-C you won’t hear any beeps (instead you can watch the green dot inside the viewfinder for confirmation).

Now I should mention what I do with my focus points. Most often when I can take my time composing, and because the center focus point is the most accurate sensor on the D90, I tend to use AF-area mode single point. I do set the Focus Point Wrap Around to wrap so I don’t have to change directions too often with the Multi-selector if I’m selecting a different point. You can also press the OK button to bring the focus point back to the center. Sometimes I lock the focus point in the center by using the AF Selector Lock switch.

The big advantage to this setup is I can focus on one thing, expose correctly by pointing somewhere else in the scene and compose the view where I want it. When I first used this set up it took about a day to get into the groove but now it’s “just the way it is.” So don't try this without a solid day of practice. About halfway through the day you'll probably be sold on this method.
6:14AM, 26 March 2009 PDT (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

A last mention about focus points - when shooting fast moving action or I’m out on the street I don’t want to fuss with selecting focus points I turn on AF-area mode 3D. Works like a charm. It’s fast and absolutely nuts!
112 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

A corollary to the previous discussion is a Trap Focus Setup. This is especially useful for sports photography or anytime you have a spot where you know the action will happen. You need to be in AF-Single for this to work so set your auto focus to AF-S. Now try focusing on a point nearby using the AE-L/AF-L button. Let go of the AE-L/AF-L button. Now you have fixed the focus. Backup a step or two at your target and hit the shutter release. The camera won’t fire. Slowly walk forward while continuing to hold the shutter release all the way down. As the target comes into focus – bang off goes the shutter. Neat trick huh?

So generally what you want to happen is to have the target move through the preselected focus area. I’ve used it during baseball games when there’s a guy on third and I’m guessing he’s coming home. I focus on home plate, wait for the runner to slide home and follow the action in. If you’ve got 4.5fps turned on you probably have a winner. I also use it at the race track taking photos of oncoming cars coming at me through the turn. The camera in these situations will react faster than a human so I use it to my advantage.

These things are what make the D90 such a powerful little box!
Originally posted 112 months ago. (permalink)
Rich Beaubien edited this topic 112 months ago.

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Nick @ Luminex says:

Well, I for one will certainly try those ... I was aware that the button could be assigned to focus, but really didn't understand too well why I would ever want to do that. Now I know.

I know more than I did before, and that's an absolute good. Keep 'em coming!
112 months ago (permalink)

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John_Barreyro says:

Thank you for sharing this. I will try it.
112 months ago (permalink)

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Wells Photos says:

I follow your procedure, but I'm having trouble understanding the advantages. But if you have become accustomed to it and it's working for you - great.
112 months ago (permalink)

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Leviticus Web is a group moderator Leviticus Web says:

Will give that a go, camera is set and ready testing tomorrow, I can always swap back if it's not working. Am liking the focus trap trick can see where that would be useful.
112 months ago (permalink)

rlketcham [deleted] says:

Thanks for these tips I can see how the second one would be great for some of the slower focusing lenses.
112 months ago (permalink)

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Thumperware says:

ITVF this sounds really, really interesting... I was about to set it up, but then two things came to my mind...

1) might be better to not do it, or my hubbie will be totally puzzled at why the camera is not focusing when he uses it... (the shutter release will no longer focus)

2) what is the difference between this technique and using AF-S to focus on your subject, then pointing at something else and using AE-L to get the exposure right? (or the other way around, get exposure right first with AE-L and then focus and shoot?

Thanks for this tips, they really make us think about what options we have available. And I do agree with you, D90 is seems to be soooo flexible in the way you can customize it to meet all your needs!
112 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

...often I find myself focusing on one spot while metering on a second area of the composition. Having them both tied to the shutter button makes that difficult. It's about control. When there's action it's hands down faster. This technique is being used by very experienced pros and they are passing it onto savy amateurs in their classes and seminars.

...There are three basic AE-L/AF-L button options:

Lock the focus & exposure while holding the AE-L/AF-L button down. This option is OK for basic issues but as the compositions get complex you need to separate the two functions.

Lock the exposure while holding the AE-L/AF-L button down works but if the subject is not on the focus point then the camera will attempt to refocus as the shutter release is pressed.

And the one I advocate is to focus while holding the AE-L/AF-L button down.

Now if AF Area Mode is set to AF-S it works just like the default setting using the shutter release. That is press it the camera will focus and once focused it will beep and lock. In order focus again you need to release and press again. That's OK but not great. There's a good chance you'll miss a shot if there's some action and movement.

If AF Area Mode is set to AF-C the camera will continue to focus until the button is released. In static situations it's basically the same as AF-S. I focus on my target and let go. Done. The subject is in focus.

In an action situation -- all of a sudden your 5-year-old takes off down the hill. Pan along and the camera is focusing the whole trip. You can just take shots as they happen.

If you had AF Area Mode set to AF-S you would be pressing and releasing the AE-L/AF-L button to insure focus. There's a good chance you will miss the shot. If you left it in AF-C in the first place you're less likely to miss the shot.

I think I answered the second question above. But sorry to say as far as the hubbie goes, he's out of luck. I'm a Hubbie and my wife is always talking about retraining. :-D
Originally posted 112 months ago. (permalink)
Rich Beaubien edited this topic 111 months ago.

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Thumperware says:

Thanks, got it this time. Good explanation as always :) Wish you a great day.
112 months ago (permalink)

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tomáš.kobylka says:

That is a very cool set up. Just change the settings and tried it out a bit, must say i really like it. Thanks for the insight
112 months ago (permalink)

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James Enloe says:

Ok, my head is spinning just a bit, but I think this is coming into focus. So many options.... But, very interested to try this out.
112 months ago (permalink)

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man1c says:

So would you say the TFS you point out, could be used for say dog agility, ie TF on the jump point and wait?
112 months ago (permalink)

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I ♥ MY NIKON :) says:

Well I took a break from tax returns today and took a walk, I set my camera last night to these settings. I must say, I thnnk this is the answer. I have had issues but couldnt put my hands on what it was. After about 10 shots of a horse, just horsing around with the new set up (excuse the pun) I like it. it seems so natural. it seems more like how I learned years ago on my FG. I hope this is the trick I needed!

hopefully I will be trying some "trap focus trick" at my daughters Rugby game tomorrow!!!!
thanks for sharing
112 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

...yes you could easily use it for dog agility. Pick your focus point and follow the dog into it holding the shutter release down.

I'm happy to see folks trying and experimenting with this technique.
112 months ago (permalink)

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Wells Photos says:

Thanks for the patient explanations In the Viewfinder. I understand your process, but I don't see examples of where it would be better than other methods.

My style is to have the AE-L/AF-L set to AE lock (hold). In my mind, this is almost a requirement for video on the D90 and it is OK for stills too. If I'm interested in setting the exposure separately from focusing / shooting (which appears to be your primary goal) I can aim and meter anywhere I want and press the button once to lock that exposure. Then I can recompose and shoot as many shots as I want in any of the autofocus modes. Another press of the AE-L/AF-L button switches off the lock.

How is that much different than your approach, with the exception of you switching buttons around?

As far as the trap focus trick, that's interesting and I didn't realize it would work that way. I may play with that some more. The only catch I think is you may not get the shot you want. In your example (person sliding into home) it may fire when you don't want it to. A leg starts to appear in the frame, the in-focus indicator lights up and it shoots. I would probably pre-focus (by pressing the shutter halfway) and flip the manual focus switch and then wait, ready to bang down the shutter or hold it down in continuous fire mode.

I don't know. Maybe I'm stuck on the usual approaches, but I'm still having trouble seeing the benefits of your suggestions. On the example of the 5 year old heading down a hill on a sled. That's a pretty typical and not difficult situation that can be handled very handily by the regular methods. I could just flip over to continuous high speed and AF-C and bang away and the focus would track and do its thing.

I hope you don't take it as criticism - that's not my intention. This is an interesting post and I'm glad you started it.
112 months ago (permalink)

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blahblablity says:

I like the focus trap technique. That's pretty cool. Now I just need somewhere to test it. It's too rainy in Portland right now!
112 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

...It seems as though you are using video more often then I (I've used it twice, maybe three times) so you may be looking for something a bit different from your camera than I.

My primary goal is to get good photos. To that end I want to get control of exposure, focus and composition as discrete components. In order to do that, I need to separate the focusing and exposure control.

The reason I do not use the shutter for focus is due to the use of AF-C. As long as the shutter button is half-pressed, the camera will continuously focus the lens. I want to be able to lock focus on a subject, and then recompose. With the shutter focusing method I cannot do that.

As an observation, with AE-L/AF-L set to AE lock (hold) it is possible to loose your exposure setting if the meter turns off. I assume you've extended the time a bit using c2 (say to 8sec or maybe even as long as 16 sec) which of course uses more battery.

And you're right about the trap focus in that you may be off and get nothing but a cleat in focus. So you need good understanding and control of DOF. I have found the success-failure ratio using the technique in fast action sequences is so much in my favor that I use it quite often.

Lastly I’d suggest trying this technique. But give it a fair shake say at least a ½ day of shooting so you can understand it’s advantages or disadvantages to your particular kind of shooting. I won’t be offended if you say yeah nice stuff but it’s really useless for me. “To each his own”, as my mother would say.
111 months ago (permalink)

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Edster951 says:

I'm off to the races and have set up the controls for "focus trap"

I'll try these setting while the cars are drifting around the corners...

Now how was my camera set before all this?????? Will the two green dots reset put be back again??
111 months ago (permalink)

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Kelly G. Photography says:

Thanks for the info! This will be my weekend assignment!
111 months ago (permalink)

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deeindiana says:

Forgive me: I'm new to the D90 and being dense. I understand #1 of your instructions but not 2 and 3. Where do I make these adjustments?

1) I set Auto Focus to AF-C (AF-Continuous) by pushing the AF button on top of the camera (next to the screen) while turning the main command dial button.
2) Next I set f4: Assign AE-L/AF-L button to AF-ON.
3) Lastly I set c1: Shutter-Release button AE-L to ON.
111 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

...both f4 and c1 can be found under the Custom Setting Menu area. Press menu on the back of the camera. Press the left arrow on the Multi-Selector and then select the pencil (3rd from the top). You'll note there's an A section, a B section etc.

Does that help?
111 months ago (permalink)

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deeindiana says:

Yes! Thank you!
111 months ago (permalink)

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Bluemonkey08 says:

A quick check.
If say for example i want to use this trap focus setup to do macro photography say close up of a bee on a flower.

the flower is slightly out of focus and thus it wouldnt shoot.. as long as a bee comes along and goes into the focusing plane, it should trigger the shutter to go off.

however am I correct to say that this is not possible on the D90 given that it doenst have a wired remote?

I was trying the IR remote to start but i think it overrides the trap focus setup.
111 months ago (permalink)

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bandika_2000 says:

In the Viewfinder

for me is more logic to first get the exposure what I want, with half press the shutter (c1: Shutter-Release button AE-L to ON) with spot metering, then focus on the subject, with (AE-L/AF-L button to AF-ON) then bang, bang, shot, shot.

In any case outdoor is a great method to use.

Indoor you can use multi metering method, but when the sun is strong outdoor, only spot metering is the only way...

thanks Viewfinder
111 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

Bluemonkey08 and bandika_2000...sorry must of missed these postings.

Bluemonkey08 you're working in unfamiliar territory. I don't think the IR shouldn't change the focusing functionality but I'm not sure. I'd have to experiment with it. If the camera is not firing then the bee must not be in focus. But I'd figure it must be tough because of the very narrow DOFs you're working with.

bandika_2000...thanks for the comments.
110 months ago (permalink)

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Darryl Hill Photography says:

I mostly shoot on M, so I've already disconnected the exposure from the shutter. I've tried AF-ON to separate focusing from shutter release, but was not such a big fan of that except in the case of trap focusing.
110 months ago (permalink)

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PJ Wills says:

Bluemonkey08 Pro User says:

however am I correct to say that this is not possible on the D90 given that it doenst have a wired remote?


The D90 DOES have a wired remote. Order a MC-DC2 from B&H.
www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?ci=0&shs=Mc-...

I absolutely love mine. I could not live with out it.
110 months ago (permalink)

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NixonChase.com says:

well said, In the ViewFinder. A very clear + concise explanation of the D90's capabilities/flexibility.
110 months ago (permalink)

buu-^ [deleted] says:

I'm trying this setup and I find it very confortable. The 2 main issues I have are :

1) in portrait the AE-L/AF-L button is not so easy to press (I don't use a battery grip).
2) In Trap Focus, in order to have it working, I must use a pretty narrow DOF and it's not easy to have the correct focus before the action comes in the frame. I think i need A LOT of practice for that.
110 months ago (permalink)

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ausyg says:

About the remote for a D90; I programmed a universal programmable remote for a Sanyo TV: works like charm!

Is it possible to print the articles out?
110 months ago (permalink)

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ausyg says:

Just figured it out: copy -paste!!
110 months ago (permalink)

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jhun111jhun says:

i have a question, i just got my first dslr (d90) last week, what auto focus will i use if im shooting a group picture? and if ever tha people are standing behind each other? thank you very much in advance
109 months ago (permalink)

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bobo moirangthem says:

The techniques mentioned here are real gems.. works fantastic (gotta practise though)... I am loving my D90.
109 months ago (permalink)

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CircadianReflections Photography says:

I just got my D90 back from service this afternoon and changed to these settings then took it for a walk around the neighborhood. I think this is the solution to my metering issues!

I never used the AE/AF-L button before today. Who knew!

I'm going to upload the few shots I took now. I hope they come out as good as they look on the LCD.

Thanks!
108 months ago (permalink)

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vannex09 says:

this works!thanks...
108 months ago (permalink)

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J.Hernetkoski says:

Thanks! This was a great tip.
108 months ago (permalink)

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PhotoAbuse says:

I have read tip threads on various groups and have found a few of them helpful but none as helpful to me as this one. I was a little leery of changing my focus button habits. I fear I am getting a little old and set in my ways sometimes but that's a story for another day!

But after running a test series with still shots and moving shots, I have to say that the tips shared in this thread simply ROCK!

While it seemed odd at first getting used to focusing, even I picked up on it pretty quicky. The trap focus tip, as my former governor once said, is %(*#(G@* golden! I shoot a lot of HS sports for a local paper and that will come in very handy. For that alone, I Thank You

Just use S focus mode and pay attention to your dof. Keep it no larger than f5.6 if possible. You might have to go f8 if there are a few rows of people. Search around the threads and I'm pretty sure someone has covered this for you.
108 months ago (permalink)

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Robert P Baxter says:

I should probably remit my appreciation for the information as well. I've been using this configuration since about april or so because of this thread. At first it was a little odd to get used to, but then I quickly picked up on the technique and I've been using it ever since. It is especially useful in the lowest of light conditions.

Once again, thanks for sharing!
108 months ago (permalink)

michaelmcgimpsey [deleted] says:

Very interesting tips. Thanks for sharing.
108 months ago (permalink)

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CircadianReflections Photography says:

I've been using this technique since I received my camera back just over a week ago. I'm having a hard time keeping my thumb on the AE-L/AF-L button. It's a big reach for me. After awhile the webbing in between my thumb and fingers starts to hurt. Not good.

I'm going to back to AE-L Lock. I won't be reaching as long that way.

Unless anyone has another idea? "-)
108 months ago (permalink)

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12ick says:

Thanks for this awesome technique "In the Viewfinder" :)

I've used this technique for a few weeks now and I think it has helped me a lot but I still need more practice with metering.
106 months ago (permalink)

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dnvarner says:

Thanks for this information; I saw this recommended and setup my new D90 this way. Took the new setup for a spin on Sunday and it seemed to work out pretty good. It is confusing when I hand it to my partner to take a shot...everyone thinks the focus is on the shutter :-)

I do have a question about this setup and metering, can you explain how in a little more detail? I'm new to photography, so it not that clear to me.
What I think is that (1) I focus on the subject and now that focus is locked (2)point my camera at whatever I'm going to meter for---example: the sky and this is where it gets fuzzy... (3) change my aperture/shutter to zero out the meter ? (4) point camera back at subject (5) press shutter to take picture. Is that correct?
Originally posted 98 months ago. (permalink)
dnvarner edited this topic 98 months ago.

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percy and liam says:

Will try this technique. Thanks! :)
98 months ago (permalink)

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Chamsky says:

Question. I thought I'd try this on my D40 first. Settings can be adjusted just the the same as the D90. AE-L/AF-L for focus, shutter button for exposure lock. AF-C on. Once I lock focus let's say something in the foreground, release the button and then recompose, I cannot get my shutter to release due to focus trap. I.e, only when I return the focus point back to its original location will the shutter release. Am I missing something here? Thanks.
98 months ago (permalink)

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cmadir says:

That should work. I would double check that you are on af-c since af-s or af-a will trap focus
98 months ago (permalink)

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Bill-S2001 says:

Good old thread, excellent posts by In the Viewfinder

I use the AE-L/AF-L button as the focus on button quite often. I do not think it is faster than when tied to the release button for shots where you don't have time to "plan", like shooting ad-hoc of people in a gatherings / kids at birthday party. But I use it to enhance creativity because it's like the old days when you had to focus with a ring yourself (slow down). But AF was invented because it is faster than that, just as AF on shutter release is faster than reaching for AF-ON buttons IMO. It shines as a technique for known or pre-focus situations hands down. As such, it is the top item in "My menu" for easy access from the Fn button for changing.

The biggest problem for me with this is that the AE-L button does not fall naturally under my thumb on the D90 as does the LV button. So I find myself many times pressing LV instead of the AE-L button to focus, even though I use this mode quite ofter. For my hand size, the AE-L is in the wrong place and I have to reach for it. This problem goes away in portrait mode with my battery pack.

I never lock the exposure as I am always in matrix mode. Only if I am doing "zone" metering for critical metering would I be in spot. Center weighted is useless to me unless an old lens needs it. Matrix does a fairly good job of getting exposures right. When it doesn't - straight to manual for me, or quick exposure compensation. Spot metering is "dangerous" as you have to spot on the right thing (middle values) or else be cognizant of over or under exposing after metering, depending on the lightness of the thing metered. Too much to think about in quick work situations, but a must for the "zone".
98 months ago (permalink)

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Ethan h. says:

@In the Viewfinder,

these are fantastic tips!
98 months ago (permalink)

MoSHa* [deleted] says:

+ 1 for this AF setup, its great.
98 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

It's fun to see this post come back to life.

Thanks folks. I'm glad you all find it useful.
98 months ago (permalink)

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christie.nelson says:

I just can't seem to get this to work and I really want to try it.

I've gone into the custom menu, autofocus menu, AE-L/AF-L for MB-D80, then AF-ON... and made sure the AF-ON is actually set to on.

The camera is in AF-C mode.

However when I press the AE-L/AF-L button and try to focus on something, nothing happens. Half depressing the shutter still focuses the lens.

In addition to trying that I have also tried setting custom setting C1 (Timers/AE lock) to ON.
Now, the shutter button won't initiate focus. But neither will the AE-L/AF-L button!

Can anyone please tell me what I'm doing wrong? I have the 50mm 1.4G lens attached to the camera. It has it's own motor (I previously had a D60) but so far it has no focusing issues with the D90 in normal mode).

Christie
97 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

@christie.nelson "I've gone into the custom menu, autofocus menu, AE-L/AF-L for MB-D80, then AF-ON... and made sure the AF-ON is actually set to on."

With this you've set the MD-D80 battery pack's AE-L/AF-L button, NOT the AE-L/AF-L on the camera near the viewfinder.

The easiest way to set it correctly is as described above...
-"I set Auto Focus to AF-C (AF-Continuous) by pushing the AF button on top of the camera (next to the screen) while turning the main command dial button."
97 months ago (permalink)

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christie.nelson says:

AF-C wasn't a problem but I was following instructions from another website regarding the MB-D80. I thought it seemed strange!

Have done as you described above and can happily say it's now focusing!

THANKS
97 months ago (permalink)

Firmware [deleted] says:

I have tried this a few times but always revert back to the old method, using the AF-E button for auto exposure lock. I can see how people would like this method, but like some of the others, I find the AF-E button in an unnatural position for me on the D90.

Maybe the location of the AE-L button is something to keep in mind when choosing your next camera body.
97 months ago (permalink)

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Anindya Banerjee says:

[OT]I don't know if a thread can be marked as favorite like a photo in flickr. If anybody know please share, I want to mark this thread favorite so that, I can get it as and when needed as well as I can refer this to some of my friends and relatives as and when necessary. [/OT]
Originally posted 97 months ago. (permalink)
Anindya Banerjee edited this topic 97 months ago.

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pchoi94 says:

Hi all,

Thanks for all of the great info, I've been trying this technique out for a couple of days and I definitely see the benefits of it, as well as some of the drawbacks (can't just hand it to someone who doesn't know, and difficult to shoot with awkward positions (such as self portraits) since it requires two fingers and a good grip).

I have a question though: if I have these settings set and I want to use my ML-L3 wireless remote, will the remote trigger an auto focus before the shutter release, or do I have to pre-focus or change settings back before I use the remote? i suppose I could easily test this myself, but you know how it is...
Originally posted 96 months ago. (permalink)
pchoi94 edited this topic 96 months ago.

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

Yes you will need to pre-focus using the AE-L/AF-L button.

This shot is done exactly like that...
Boston Photo Mob -- Help Portrait 2009
You can see me on the right with the remote. Not only that, the camera fired two flashes using CLS for some fill light.
Originally posted 96 months ago. (permalink)
Rich Beaubien edited this topic 96 months ago.

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Naples_FL_Photog says:

Thank you so much for these wonderful tips and explanations!!! I think this solution will be perfect for me once I practice it!

Question though: I hear a lot of people talking about "back-button focusing" on other forums - is this the technique they are referring to?
93 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

Yes it is basically the same.

Glad you find it useful.
93 months ago (permalink)

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Colin Dick Photos says:

I use this method all the time now, thanks for the tip. Although I do have to change it back to normal when letting others use the camera as they tend to forget to focus!
93 months ago (permalink)

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jpgabriel11 says:

hi,

I find this useful for focusing accurately.. but I don't know why I always get front-focus problem with my d90 even if I use the technique.. using 85mm f/1.8D..

any suggestions?.. thanks!
92 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

Sorry I've been busy on assignment so I missed this...

It might be a couple of things. Your camera is really front focusing - test it - and it needs to be adjusted by Nikon. Or you are focusing on the wrong spot in your composition. I generally look for a spot 1/3 the way in unless I have a real tight DOF.
92 months ago (permalink)

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Chamsky says:

I tried this again with my D40, still doesn't work. Works on my D90 though. Wonder what it is. Any thoughts? Thanks.
92 months ago (permalink)

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victorli1000 says:

@In the Viewfinder : it never happened in my D90.

You need to be in AF-Single for this to work : check

so set your auto focus to AF-S. : check

Now try focusing on a point nearby using the AE-L/AF-L button.: check

Let go of the AE-L/AF-L button.: check

Now you have fixed the focus. Backup a step or two at your target and hit the shutter release. : check

then: it fires anyway, with a blurred photo. ??
91 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

You have done all of the things in the first post?
And then have changed AF to single as per the third post?
91 months ago (permalink)

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victorli1000 says:

@ In the Viewfinder :my mistake. Still can't make it happen though. I am under the impression that you try to make the camera focus to the 'trap' point by pressing AE-L/AF-L button. But after I stepped back and then press the shutter release, the camera refocus and shoot, emm?
91 months ago (permalink)

Rich Beaubien [deleted] says:

If the camera is refocusing then you haven't done the first part correctly. Focusing should only happen when you press the AE-L/AF-L button.
91 months ago (permalink)

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CharlesSalvacion says:

Does it work also on a D70? thanks!
88 months ago (permalink)

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BenR167 says:

Found this a while back and i like!
Thanks
Originally posted 88 months ago. (permalink)
BenR167 edited this topic 88 months ago.

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hd350z says:

i notice my focus change a little bit even after i move slightly to recompose or change something in the menu setting. Here is an example:
- aim camera at subject
- use AE-L/AF-L button to center focus on subject
- move camera away from face to change setting for off camera flash setting in CLS commander mode
- aim camera again at subject and compose
- press shutter half way to lock exposure and all the way to take the pic
- review the pic, zoom in on subject and find it slightly out of focus.

seem like i have to press the AE-L/AF-L button all the time before pressing the shutter to take the picture, any slight movement after focus locked will mess up my focus. I thought only moving forward or backward few inches will mess it up, not few millimeters??
88 months ago (permalink)

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JamesAlexR says:

Forgive my ignorance, but for the exposure side of things could you not just change exposure compensation? Or would that be relying on your skills and not the camera's metering?

Thanks, useful thread!
88 months ago (permalink)

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man1c says:

Although had asked question on this thread a while ago I didn't use as was unfamiliar with D90 at that time. Have been using BBF for a while now and really like it. Bit I had forgotten about (till I refound this thread) was using the shutter button to lock exposure. Going to give this a bash tomorrow as doing some candids at a wedding, but am familiar enough now to swap back if finding difficult.
Thanks again INTVF great thread.
Matt
82 months ago (permalink)

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Paul Broderick says:

just set it up and it seems to be a good way to focus and shoot. thanks for the tip ...
26 March 2009 ---> 3 Sept 2011 nice tip thread!
82 months ago (permalink)

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Paul Broderick says:

I've been using this method for a few weeks now and love it. My thumb, however, keeps hitting the live button. Just a matter of getting use to holding the D 90 camera a little different. Thanks for the info 'In the Viewfinder.'
81 months ago (permalink)

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Camvia Photography says:

I tried this today and wasnt too fond of it...the hand positioning is a little weird but I could get used to it...my main issue is that it doesnt seem to focus sharp...pics seem to be just slightly out of focus...and yes I am waiting until it is fully focused aka green dot is solid....any ideas?
81 months ago (permalink)

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cmadir says:

could be that after you are releasing the AF-L button to lock the focus you are inadvertently moving the camera just a little before you hit the shutter release.
81 months ago (permalink)

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ippofromearth says:

i use BackButtonFocus EXCLUSIVELY on my second D90 :)
AF-C all the times (just release button when not tracking ;)
for my hand AF-L button placement on D90 is very comfy and natural,
way better than on basic Canon cameras that introduced this first!!
another star for the great D90 ;)
64 months ago (permalink)

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Paul Broderick says:

I have this thread pinned. Just stopping bye to see if anything is new. Great thread, changed the way I shoot.
43 months ago (permalink)

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