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Sienna62 5:00pm, 3 December 2011
I would love to hear your tips and tricks for shooting your nature images!

***How do you keep your gear safe while shooting out in the elements?

***What gear do you use?

***When should you use flash outdoors?

***How do you get those amazing moon shots?
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Sienna62 6 years ago
My favorite new lens for shooting outdoors is my Nikon 50mm f/1.8 lens. It is a manual focus lens on my Nikon D60 body, but I am starting to appreciate the freedom in composing my images using manual focus. This lens produces some amazing bokeh!
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Sienna62 5 years ago
Here is a site I found with some wonderful tips for Nature Photography!

www.ethanmeleg.com/tips.htm
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Sienna62 5 years ago
And some tips for nature photography from Nikon:

www.nikonusa.com/Learn-And-Explore/Photography-Tips/Natur...
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Roy Prasad PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Roy Prasad (moderator) 5 years ago
Thanks, this thread is a great idea, and one that deserves more visibility and participation!

Here are some notes I put together sometime ago about using polarizer filters, in case anyone is interested. I have uploaded this as a private photo, but it is accessible with this guest pass.
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Roy Prasad PRO 5 years ago
Achieving the proper depth of field (DoF) is critical to nature photography. Of course, DoF is critical in other kinds of photography as well, but nature photography sees some of the widest ranges of DoF, from paper thin for sharply isolating small subjects to nearly infinite for the ultimate sharpness in landscapes.

Here is a site with a nifty DoF calculator for figuring out DoF and hyperfocal distances. They also have an iPhone app that works, but it is a little clumsy to use.

www.dofmaster.com/dofjs.html
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Roy Prasad PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Roy Prasad (moderator) 5 years ago
For bird photography, I highly recommend a relatively inexpensive and extremely useful device called Better Beamer. This useful product was first pointed out to be by noted bird photographer Kevan Sunderland.

This is a Fresnel lens attachment for your flash that streamlines the light from a flash and projects it down some 50-100 feet or more. It delivers a surprising amount of additional light on your target, which can be very useful in low light conditions, especially when shooting at long focal lengths.
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bernard60 PRO Posted 5 years ago. Edited by bernard60 (member) 5 years ago
Some really useful information here many thanks Roy and Sienna Much appreciated!!
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Sienna62 Posted 5 years ago. Edited by Sienna62 (admin) 5 years ago
This site has some great photography tips for shooting wildlife and nature images:
Nature and Wildlife Photography Tips Center
re" birds....Patience to wait for the birds to come to you
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Roy Prasad PRO 5 years ago
For landscape photography, especially if you're traveling, a light weight, carbon-fiber tripod is an invaluable tool. Even if you have a camera that is capable of crazy high ISO 256,000 or whatever the marketing blather claims, any ISO over 640 reduces the sharpness and microcontrast of landscape images.

I recently got back from a week long trip in the Canadian Rockies, and I am really glad I brought along a light weight carbon fiber SLIK tripod. It was worth the additional hassle of carrying it in the plane or with me all day. When I had anything except great lighting, I could use my tripod, clamp down the ISO to 100, use f/8, and let the camera shoot at 1/4 sec or whatever it took. As a result, I came back with dozens of exceptionally clean images, even in low light.

Even in bright light, a tripod is really handy for achieving precise focus with Live View. Autofocusing accuracy with wide angle lenses is quite poor even in the best pro cameras like a Leica S2 or a Nikon D4 or D800. For critical focusing, you really need Live View, which is best used with a tripod, anyway.

So, a light weight, carbon fiber tripod is highly recommended.
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Sienna62 4 years ago
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Roy Prasad PRO 3 years ago
This is a fantastic tip on autofocusing! I am changing over!

nikonrumors.com/2014/01/25/how-to-use-nikons-af-on-and-ba...
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Sienna62 3 years ago
Roy Prasad:

This is something I definitely need to try! Thank you for sharing :-)
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Roy Prasad PRO Posted 3 years ago. Edited by Roy Prasad (moderator) 3 years ago
For anyone interested in landscape photography, I highly recommend watching this video, not once, not twice, not thrice, but ten, 20 times, until all the insights Tim Cooper shares here are a part of your DNA! This tutorial is that good.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8HZCdieSAo

I've been shooting landscapes for a long time, and I've covered a lot of things from the California coast to Yosemite to the Niagara Falls to Hawaii, the Swiss Alps and the Himalayas, and I've taken some amazing shots. Over that time, I've learned many things the painful way. I only wish I had seen this video 25 years ago! Really brilliant.

Here's a link to Tim Cooper's web site:
timcooperphotography.com

Roy
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Roy Prasad PRO Posted 3 years ago. Edited by Roy Prasad (moderator) 3 years ago
Some amazing and inspirational photographs at this link by landscape photographer Marc Adamus at this link on 500px.

I just don't have it in my psychological make up to tough it out in the wild like these guys do, but the ideas are very much applicable right in the middle of civilization, as well!
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Sienna62 3 years ago
Wow! Marc's images are unbelievable! It sounds like a dreamy life to be able to spend all of your time in amazing places taking pictures. I wouldn't be able to tough it out quite that much...but I would definitely love hitting the road in a motor home for a few years...putzing around from place to place.
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Sienna62 3 years ago
Roy, I watched the video you posted a few weeks ago and I agree with you that this is a must-see video on landscape photography. I learned so much from it. I will definitely be watching it again. Thank you for sharing! The video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8HZCdieSAo
Robert Ron Grove 2 PRO 3 years ago
I have a few thoughts Id like to share ,
#1 get the best equipment you can afford , I like cannon , a bit pricey but very dependable . You do get pretty much what you pay for , and the pros have the edge . But they can get money to pay the extra cost for equipment .

#2 prayer if you have faith is what works for me for oppertunites .

#3 find good instructors to learn from , or spend years in trial and error . Good instructors ? look at their work ,is that what you want ?

All the best to you ...
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Roy Prasad PRO Posted 2 years ago. Edited by Roy Prasad (moderator) 2 years ago
Some really outstanding macro photos here that are worth studying. Really excellent compositions that creatively position the subjects in the context of the available light to create lovely images. No special gear required - this is just a matter of visualizing how the subject might look, exploring different angles and framing before clicking, and exercising patience! Photography basics!

iso.500px.com/the-magical-macro-worlds-of-500px-photograp...
Thank You ( 1.3 million + ) views!! [deleted] 1 year ago
Living in a world full of nature all around us it became urgent to share it with the rest of the world with my Photography on a budget income of only $700 a month to live on and pay all the bills!! That is when I bought my Fujifilm T550 after doing nearly a year of intense research on a cheap quality p&s camera on a tight budget for under $150 that would provide me with at a minimum some manual options and ability to enhance them if needed using software simple and free to use enabling me to not just be looked upon as " another picture " but instead be seen as a talented person who is able to capture nice moments with unique angles and perspectives with soft or sharp enhancements and vivid colors!! Using my $147 dollar camera which time and time again has exceeded some photos taken from some 1,250 camera's that have all so many manual controls it would take a year of shooting to master them all to know precisely how to get the perfect picture quality, angle, depth of field, etc. Enough about all that now lets "focus" on my work taking nature Photography on a budget camera... for those who don't have thousands to spend on a camera! Use a tripod to help stabilize your images for landscape shots especially at low ISO settings. I typically use ISO 200 for everyday normal shooting because 100 just blurs most images with my camera. Anything above 400 ISO will produce noise or grainy looking images becoming slightly visible to the eye on the computer screen. Action shots require at least a fast shutter speed of 1/4000 sec. sometimes slower moving subjects cam be captured with 1/2000 sec. as I have done many times such as apes, or zoo animals in cages that just cannot move in a large field of space most of the time and are forced to move slower. Use everything around you to your advantage such as rails, boards or even the side of a tree to steady your camera against if you don't have a tripod setup. Look at the sun direction, this is very important for getting the right lighting in your photo. The sun behind you will create a soft or brightly highlighted image of the subjects in front of you! The sun in front of you will produce what Photographers call " Silhouette " if it is in front of you and yet behind the subject you are shooting! Sunrise shooting is best for beach shots as it will always produce a glowing soft golden color to the rocks, shores, etc! Bird shooting is best in the afternoon times as it will produce a bluish hue in your photos to enhance most birds with the natural colors of the birds. If you don't believe me just take your camera out and try it for yourself.. I have been doing Photography for years now, and always use my same camera, finding the quality of images even better than the Nikon S7000 and better than Canon Powershot series which I have also tried. The online reviews say my camera sucks!! but my work can put theirs to shame! So good luck, and keep shooting. I have Huntington's Disease of the brain and use my work to help influence and inspire others who are not able to get outdoors to enjoy all that nature offers us to see and share! It's what keeps me going.
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Sienna62 1 year ago
I too had a Fujifilm camera that took amazing pictures. unfortunately, I had it with me in a sailboat one time and it capsized....wrecking the camera. I've also found that the new IPhone 6s takes amazing images....some better than I take with my Nikon D7000 of the same subject. There are some things though that I like having the Nikon 7000 for.

Thanks for your shooting tips!
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