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HIGH Contrast B/W Film (I searched before i posted don't worry)

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mp2012 says:

What is a good high contrast black and white 35mm film, preferably one that i could easily find in my local camera shop.
11:50AM, 2 July 2008 PDT (permalink)

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wickedmartini says:

What's the application and how high do you need the contrast? In some cases you can get high contrast using high contrast developers on more readily available panchromatic films.
ages ago (permalink)

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Julio-González says:

ilford HP5, you can also "PUSH" your film to get higher contrast.
ages ago (permalink)

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peterharding says:

At EI1600 you get about 4 stages between dark and light if I remember correctly.
ages ago (permalink)

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konstriktion says:

You can always add contrast in printing...
ages ago (permalink)

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zerozeroufo says:

it's discontinued and only sold online... and it's positive film not negative... but AGFA SCALA is just beautiful high-contrast black and white film.
ages ago (permalink)

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kaiyen says:

I'm a bit confused myself here. To get higher contrast, why not just underexpose and over develop? Which is pushing. Or you can underexpose and develop normally, and then bring up the tones in post, either digitally or via dodging/burning/etc.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
kaiyen edited this topic ages ago.

handy title [deleted] says:

Have a look at Ralph Gibson's work - if you think it's the look your after, here's his technique:



Having learned from the lithographic process I now go directly to contrasty subject matter and expose for the narrow contrast ratio I desire. I overexpose and overdevelop and, in the process, pick up grain and contrast. This yields a dense negative, but through the years I have found that I prefer them this way. A dense negative offers a range of possibilities that, when explored, yields greater content....

To develop Tri-X, I use 10cc of Rodinal for every roll. If I am developing two rolls of film in a two-reel tank, I fill the tank with water at 68 degrees to within a quarter of an inch of the brim. Then I pour in in 20 cc of developer and stir. This is generally considered too harsh a solution, but it gives me the quality I desire. An eleven minute development time with agitation every minute and a half for ten seconds yields a contrasty negative having the appearance of blocked highlights. Thinner negatives, finer grain, longer development... I've tried all of these approaches, but the only negative that I consider interesting in terms of its potential is the overexposed, over developed one.

ages ago (permalink)

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StaPa says:

@perkeleellinen: that's a great information! Thank you for posting. Where did you find this?
ages ago (permalink)

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Michael Nika Photography says:

You could try something like Kodalith if its still made. It's supposedly very high contrast.
ages ago (permalink)

gigantic rock [deleted] says:

Neopan 1600 with a R25A filter.
ages ago (permalink)

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Epicyclic Transmissions says:

It's best just to add contrast in printing. You can always develop your film hot for more contrast too.
I've done prints that are purely black and white with essentially no mid tones whatsoever by over exposing the print, then under developing it (remove it from the developer as soon as the shadows turn black and stop it before any mid tones develop in) they look more like xerox copies than photographs.
ages ago (permalink)

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mp2012 says:

Thanks for the suggestions, and thanks for the info on pushing, I've never understood what that was.
ages ago (permalink)

handy title [deleted] says:

@StaPa: back in the '70s Gibson printed two books 'Darkroom' & 'Darkroom#2'. The quote is from 'Darkroom' but I copied and pasted it from a thread at APUG.
ages ago (permalink)

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Vick the Viking says:

Rollei Ortho in Rodinal !!

Can't be more contrast.
ages ago (permalink)

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Rhett Redelings says:

Fuji Neopan 400 and 1600 both produce very pleasingly high contrast images with out any special development techniques. Add a yellow filter for even more contrast.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
Rhett Redelings edited this topic ages ago.

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