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Group Description

This group is principally for Makers' Marks that have been produced as an integral part of an iron or steel product, with emphasis on buildings, structures and engineering. The occasional aluminium toucan is permitted - the word "principally" allows some leeway. Makers' Marks can help with dating, and sometimes are useful for establishing the material specification if an old structure needs to be assessed for load capacity.

Identification marks of various kinds are found on structural iron and steel sections,
rolled iron and steel rails, cast iron stanchions or columns, girders and beams, etc. These may give information about the maker (full name or initials), the material, the section overall dimensions, mass per unit length, and date. The marks will show in relief, even through many layers of paint.

Integral makers marks are not found on rolled structural iron and steel plates (or at least I have never found any) - so look instead at the smaller angle, channel, joist, beam and rail sections. However, larger sections made up from welded or bolted plates in a fabricator's workshop may bear the name of the fabricator/ steelwork contractor in stencilled paint lettering. Such painted marks are welcome in this group also - for exterior exposed steelwork these painted marks will be hidden completely under corrosion protection paintwork.

Iron foundries often cast their name onto structural and building components such as bridge edge beams and arch ribs. You may also see foundry marks on columns, shop fronts and window frames. Sometimes you will see component numbers cast with the pieces of a bridge or building frame - they were kits of parts, numbered to help with assembly.

Foundry marks will be found also on a great variety of street furniture including telephone boxes, post boxes, and lamp standards.

Groups on closely-related subjects:

Bridge Builder's Plates, the kind that are often bolted on:
www.flickr.com/groups/bridgebuilderplates/

Structural Steel and Iron Details:
www.flickr.com/groups/steelandirondetails/



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