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Canon G9 Photography Tips

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ricky.montalvo says:

Tip #1: Bring your G9 EVERYWHERE.
Originally posted at 11:26PM, 21 February 2008 PST (permalink)
ricky.montalvo edited this topic ages ago.

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Matt@Vancouver says:

Yea that's a good one. And good topic... Can't wait to hear some tips.
Anyone got any advice with using spot metering?
ages ago (permalink)

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mbching says:

Rule #2: Shoot in Raw, Always.
ages ago (permalink)

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Chris Homan says:

These are not rules but tips, so I relabelled them:

Tip #3: Have FUN!

Tip #4: Avoid the creative and auto modes and work with Av, Tv and M

Tip #5: Always work with the lowest possible ISO setting

Tip #6: When using the flash, use a piece of paper to diffuse the flash, make sure you increase the EV by +1 or more.

Tip #7: Try different angles; go low, go high
ages ago (permalink)

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Gary_Austin says:

lifespy.wordpress.com/category/tips/
More will be added, but use a wrist strap is my fav
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
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jaiminyoon56 says:

Tip #8: Speaking of street photography, the compact size (relative to a DSLR) works in your favor for not only convenience, but discreteness as well. Set the camera to mute and you have a virtually silent (still hear the quietest "click" of the shutter) camera capable of sneaking in some excellent captures of unwary subjects on the street.

If you're caught in the act of shooting a stranger, they're likely to feel less threatened by having what they perceive to be a small "tourist" camera aiming at them rather than seeing a 1D Mark III + 70-200mm f/2.8 pointed anywhere near their direction.

If you do happen to get a really upset subject, you can always defend yourself with the tank-like solid build of the G9. :)
ages ago (permalink)

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sillyhair says:

Wow !Thanks for these notes
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
sillyhair edited this topic ages ago.

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Fred911 says:

Tip#9. Keep the ISO dialed down. Try to stay below 200. Use a tripod and the self timer shutter release if necessary.
ages ago (permalink)

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Life in AsiaNZ says:

Use the cloudy setting (instead of AWB) if you want to warm up your pictures - its like adding a warming filter. I also like using the Vivid color setting when you want more saturated colors. Use the Neutral Density (ND) setting when you want a slower shutter speed.
ages ago (permalink)

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jijo272 says:

I'm confused: I took several pictures at dusk on the Canon G9 and they are dark and blurry. Then I grabbed my old Sony Cyber-shot 3X opt zoom, 5.1 mp and got a perfect picture.

I might add that when I shoot with my Canon G9 I use Auto Mode.

Any suggestions for a snowy day at dusk with the Canon G9?
ages ago (permalink)

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chebirchhayes says:

well it all depends really, maybe you your hands were steady with the sony more than the g9? anyways auto mode at dusk is gay when shooting with auto mode, better to use the manual settings. also some of the scene settings come in handy
ages ago (permalink)

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Bram du Saar says:

Tip #10: The G9 has perfect night vision/capabilities in Tv mode. In Av mode it is as blind as a bat.

Tip #11: Buy the lens adapter (LA-DC58H) and a world of accessories and options opens up to you.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
Bram du Saar edited this topic ages ago.

reminiscent earthquake [deleted] says:

Tip #12: Don't be afraid to turn the ISO up when you need to.
ages ago (permalink)

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Michael from NYC says:

"Tip #12: Don't be afraid to turn the ISO up when you need to."

I agree with Tip 12 more than with the earlier tips advising against high ISO.

In the past, I lost many shots because I was afraid to turn up the ISO. Now I stopped worrying. If the shot is only good enough to post on a blog or on Flickr, so what? It's still a good blog photo. I hardly ever print anything anyway.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
Michael from NYC edited this topic ages ago.

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Chris Homan says:

I agree, if you can't make the shot unless you use high ISO, go for it. That's why I said to go with the lowest possible ISO, not a rule, just a tip. In other words, don't use high ISO if 100 or 200 would work as well.
ages ago (permalink)

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oscar_en_fotos says:

www.photoaficionado.com/tips/g9_quicktips.html
ages ago (permalink)

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chrisvanwyksadventures says:

tip #13
buy the underwater housing... it allows you take your G9 absolutely everywhere, in accordance with tip #1
ages ago (permalink)

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Alun J. Carr says:

A modified Tip #11: Buy a metal Lensmate adaptor rather than the plastic Canon one. Even better, buy three, keep one on the camera, and permanently attach the other two to Canon's wide and tele converter lenses for quick-changing (the whole lot neatly fits into a Crumpler Pretty Boy 3000 L, and isn't a burden on the shoulder).

Tip #14: Buy Richard Franiec's grip and thumbrest to significantly improve the handling (as mentioned here). Of course, that prevents you using Tip #13.
ages ago (permalink)

giant wash [deleted] says:

tip n.15: use the voice recorder to record location information. You may need those information when key-wording.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
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Bakari Chavanu says:

Tip #16: buy an extra battery and/or car batter charger. Comes in handy when you're out shooting for a while.
ages ago (permalink)

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walking along says:

tip # 17.......if you have photoshop, and want to shoot at an iso above 100, run a gaussian blur layer at about 3-4, then switch the layer to "color" mode. This eliminates colored noise and just leaves neutral "grain". It works without blurring, I think, because most of the resolution is luminosity (B&W).

(@sixpackImatt....I use the spot meter to sample different luminosities in the scene and fine tune my exposures, in manual mode.)

Excellent discussion and thanks.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
walking along edited this topic ages ago.

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Steven Schnoor says:

Tip #18 : Learn to use the exposure lock (in Av). Saves time and hassle
in changing or mixed light conditions.
ages ago (permalink)

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Matt@Vancouver says:

What is the point of the exposure lock? Scenario? Thanks!
ages ago (permalink)

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pwscott61 says:

I couldn't agree more with tip #13. I used the Canon underwater housing on a dive and snorkel trip in Cozumel and the G9 in RAW with the WB set to 'underwater' rocks as a still camera. It also takes great video underwater!
ages ago (permalink)

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Matt@Vancouver says:

I continue to be confused about the practical use of spot metering. What kind of example scenraio would I use it in and how do I even use it with the G9 ... I play with it a lot and I can't figure out what's going on.
ages ago (permalink)

giant wash [deleted] says:

Spot metering is useful when you want to spot meter, it is as simple as that. By that, I mean when you are more interested is achieving the optimum/accurate meter reading of a particular spot on the subject rather than the whole subject.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
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JeffInVan says:

Spot metering is simply reading exposure settings off a 'spot' rather than the average of the whole scene. Practical uses would be metering a backlit scene (say someone's face with the sun at their back) so that the camera is basing the exposure based on the light readings from the face rather than the sun pouring in behind the head.
ages ago (permalink)

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Matt@Vancouver says:

oohhhh... I see ... so it will adjust the lighting to expose properly for the face vs underexposing everything including the face because of the abundance of sunlight from behind???
ages ago (permalink)

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Cassi-Rose says:

Spot metering is excellent when shooting macro. Either that or manual focus but I find the spot metering easier to use for macro shots.
ages ago (permalink)

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fire_one says:

Tip: Use an external viewfinder. Its fun
ages ago (permalink)

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ruchai says:

Why use RAW with G9? I found out I could take good pictures in JPEG with my G9. So I never will use RAW with my G9. G9 is for fun and JPEG from G9 are so perfect.

IMG_1777
ages ago (permalink)

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Mag-Uuma says:

I think the advice to take pics in RAW is if you want to edit the picture in photoshop or any post production editing tool. If you want your picture as is or with minimal PP editing, then JPEG will be fine.
ages ago (permalink)

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ruchai says:

Why take RAW with Canon G9? Why not Canon 1D Mark IV?
ages ago (permalink)

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walking along says:

I shoot raw among other reasons because of the rather narrow dynamic range (3-4 useful stops) of the sensor. I will often make two viewable files from a single raw exposure and then blend them in PP editing. This markedly increases the dynamic range. Also, I don't like the sharpening protocol for jpeg files so I can turn that function way down when I create tiff files. Also the color gamut is much larger in RBG 1998 than in sRBG so I have more color hues to start with.

And @ruchai: I'd never go to most of the scenes I photograph, if I were carrying $10,000+ in gear. Smaller sensors are the future of photography, IMHO.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
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davidcampbellphoto says:

I think bigger sensors are the future of photography, but smaller cameras. I would love a small point and shoot with a big sensor and fast lens.
I shoot RAW constantly. I like having control and if I want a jpeg it's easy to convert, and I can do a much better job of controlling the sharpening and saturation on my own. I would like it if the auto mode could write in raw sometimes when I don't want to think about anything though.
Best example I can think of for spot metering might be a concert. Your camera meters by averaging the luminosity of the area it is metering and trying to expose it to come up 18% gray. So when you shoot something like a concert with stage lighting, the stage lights hitting a small area on your subject wind up drastically over exposed. Set your focal point on that spot and use the spot meter to just meter a tiny area in your focal point and it should get it, but I always chimp to get things right when I use a spot meter, and I use it very rarely.
The voice recorder is a great tool if you are a professional and have to write captions. Nikon put it on the D2X but not the D300, and I can't figure out why, I'm still kinda mad about that.
My best tip would be to get an external flash and a transmitter to trip it off camera and learn to use off-axis flash to light your images, it will open up a whole new world and the G9 is a camera you can do this with. When I bought it I had 2 requirements for a point and shoot, hot shoe and RAW.
ages ago (permalink)

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davidcampbellphoto says:

I don't get wrist straps either. I always just loop my neck straps around my wrist when I'm shooting with this or an slr so it doesn't drop if I let go, but I like being able to carry it over my shoulder when I'm not using it, a thin neck strap converts to wrist strap pretty quick.
ages ago (permalink)

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EEB.357 says:

Learn how to use the viewfinder. Once you get the hang on how to frame your picture correctly, it is really a lot of fun to use. You will notice that the camera will rest perfectly in your hand.
ages ago (permalink)

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Neal Edelstein says:

Having trouble in macro mode, any tips? Not focusing.
ages ago (permalink)

impartial business [deleted] says:

If uou have a nikon SLR + sb800 or SB900, then mount the flash on the canon, go full manual on camera and flash and hey presto.
ages ago (permalink)

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aimhelix says:

Get CHDK for it :)

Open un incredible shutter speeds... Oh, and get built-in (real) time lapse functionality.
ages ago (permalink)

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Neal Edelstein says:

John, CHDK an easy install on a Mac?
ages ago (permalink)

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