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Robert Capa

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Hambone Lewinski is a group administrator Hambone Lewinski says:

I wasn't going crazy last night, it was Robert Capa that famously lost all but 11 exposures from the D-Day landing. It is interesting to look at the unaltered negatives (in the article below). I've generated equally troubled negatives, and when I manage to make them "printable", the results are about the same is the Capa images.

At least one of the images in the collection shows motion blur from camera movement. It is gratifying for me to see that the "masters" of photography also occasionally fire a shot before they've stopped moving the camera.

www.skylighters.org/photos/robertcapa.html

Jason
8:54AM, 23 February 2008 PDT (permalink)

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Hambone Lewinski is a group administrator Hambone Lewinski says:

Capa didn't personally "lose" the photos, BTW. The darkroom tech that he sent the film to messed them up!

Jason
ages ago (permalink)

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K. Praslowicz is a group administrator K. Praslowicz says:

I think being under a barrage of german machine gun fire and watching peopel die all around you would be acceptable grounds to have a little bit of camera shake in your pictures.
ages ago (permalink)

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Hambone Lewinski is a group administrator Hambone Lewinski says:

"I think being under a barrage of german machine gun fire and watching peopel die all around you would be acceptable grounds to have a little bit of camera shake in your pictures."

Well, right. I guess, normally, you only see the edited output of an artist's work, you know? Although I don't doubt that Capa handled a camera about a million times better than me, it is also nice to see that he was "only human."

Jason
ages ago (permalink)

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