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*** Jojo's MAIN Guide to Feeding and Diet. Pellets / Hay / Food ***

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jojo79 is a group administrator jojo79 says:

A NEW re-worked guide to feeding. This guide will provide links to indepth info on pellets, hay and fresh veg/herbs/plants.

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Rabbits need a balanced diet. The best way to do this is to feed a SMALL amount of good quality pellet or monoforage food alongside unlimited good quality hay, unlimited fresh, clean water and a small selection of veg and herbs daily. Each brand of pellet will have feeding guidelines on the packaging. These need to be considered but bear in mind they are usually over generous!

***MUSLI MIX SHOULD NOT BE FED*** as it can cause selective feeding along with dental and digestive problems.

Ideally adult bunny breeds weighing 3lb - 6lbs should have the following amounts per day:
up to 1/4 teacup of pellets
1 teacup of fresh veg
UNLIMITED hay (at least a 'ball' of hay the same size of the rabbit.)
No more than 1 teaspoon of fruit including store bought sweet treats

Adult bunny breeds weighing 6lbs - 9lbs:
up to 1/2 teacup of pellets
1 1/2 teacup of fresh veg
Unlimited hay
No more than 1 teaspoon of fruit including store bought treats.

Adult bunny breeds weighing 10lb+:
up to 1 teacup of pellets
2 teacups of fresh veg
Unlimited hay
No more than 1 teaspoon of fruit including store bought treats.

****This is only a guideline and you know your bunny best. This is a low pellet diet to encourage a bun to eat far more hay. They will 'beg' for food, but you will know if they are truely very hungry and need a larger quantity of food***

For more info on how much your bunny should weigh and how to put your bunny on a diet, see the WEIGHT GUIDE:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762925...

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BABY BUNNIES AND YOUNGSTERS - PLEASE NOTE:
Rabbits under 1 year old should be fed a different diet! They need to have unlimited access to good quality alfalfa or timothy based pellets and an unlimited supply of a mix of timothy and alfalfa hay (until they are 6 months old and longer if they are large / giant breeds). Fresh veg, herbs etc should not be introduced to the diet until the rabbit is at least 3-4 months old and should be done very slowly. Once the rabbit is between 6-10 months old you can start to reduce the number of pellets and increase the amount of fresh food. This will ensure that the rabbit has all of the nutrients needed to grow well - but not get fat by over eating a rich diet!

Also, alfalfa hay should only be fed sparingly to rabbits over 1 year old as it can be fattening and has a high concentration of calcium. Timothy hay is one of the best to feed to rabbits over 1 year old.
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HAY

This should be the MAIN part of a rabbits diet. They should eat a minimum of a ball of hay the same size as their body - EVERY DAY! You may need to reduce the amount of pellets and fresh food offered to get the diet balanced and increase hay consumption. You can also feed some dried herbs and plants too.

See the HAY GUIDE for more detailed info:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762867...

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PELLETS

Good quality pellets contain a balanced selection of nutrients, vitamins and minerals that prevent selective feeding and help work the teeth a little too. There are many different brands but here are some of the best:

* Oxbow
* Supreme
* Burgess

Here is an indepth guide to pellets and monoforage foods:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762925...

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FRESH FOOD / VEG / HERBS / PLANTS

Rabbits should be fed some fresh food daily. Personally I am a big fan of feeding herbs as they are non fattening, yummy and do not cause any gas. Some even have holistic health benefits.

* Basil
* Corriander (cilantro)
* Parsley (good for Urinary tract)
* Mint (good for digestion)

These are the main herbs that are safe to feed. Others can be fed and can be found on the following guides along with more info on which veg to feed or not.

Here is a list of herbs/plants that I know are safe to feed bunnies in small quantities. If your bunny is ill or on any other medicine then always check with your vet before feeding.

Blackberry leaf (can help clear up diarrhoea)
Birch leaves
Comfrey leaf (aids digestion, good to feed when moulting)
Dandelion leaf (good for digestion and urinary tract. Also good for older buns to help prevent ostioporosis)
Echinacia (purple) leaves & stalks
Hazel leaves
Licorice Root (small amounts as mild laxative)
Marigold flowers
Nettle leaf (good for digestion and urinary tract)
Peppermint leaf (good for digestion)
Plantain leaf
Raspberry leaf
Red Clover flowers (good for stress / change)
Strawberry leaves
Sunflower petals

As always, introduce all new foods slowly in small quantities to check that your bunny has no adverse reactions.

You can also feed fresh twigs and sticks in small quantities, like apple, birch, hawthorn, pear, willow, hazel, rose twigs and rosehips
(good for arthritic bunnies).

Bear in mind...that veg that can give us gas will have the same effect on bunnies! So limit the amount of things like cabbage, sprouts etc. Also, carrots are very sugary so should also be limited.

Make sure you wash all fresh food thoroughly to remove any contamination. Offer them to the rabbits wet as well as this gets extra moisture into them :o)

*** Although many fruits are safe for bunnies to eat, they are VERY high in sugar and should be avoided and only fed as a very occassional treat ***

A list of plants that can be safe to feed in small quantities...
GOOD PLANT GUIDE:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215759416...

Some plants can be toxic and FATAL. See this guide...
DANGEROUS PLANT GUIDE:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215759416...

Rabbits over 1 year old should not be fed large quantities of calcium rich foods as it can cause health problems. See this guide...
CALCIUM CONTENT:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762901...

Here is a good thread on growing a 'bunny garden':
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762248...

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TREATS

Store bought treats should be avoided as most contain excess sugars and preservatives that the rabbit does not need. DO NOT FEED ANY DAIRY products - so avoid yoghurt drop treats! Give fresh / died herbs and plants as treats instead. Or give one or two of their normal pellet as a treat.

You can also bake your own bunnies cookies or make ice lolly treats, see the HOMEMADE TREAT GUIDE:
www.flickr.com/groups/bunnyloversunite/discuss/7215762268...

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WATER

Fresh, clean water should be available AT ALL TIMES! Bottles are easier to keep full and clean however many bunnies prefer to drink from a bowl. Bottles need to be well cleaned once a week to remove any build up inside. If your bunny lives outdoors - you need to buy a cover for the bottle to reduce the amount of algae that grows inside and also to stop it over heating in summer and freezing in winter. Bottles should be checked daily to ensure they are in good working order.

Water bowls or crocks should be shallow and heavy to avoid the rabbit knocking it over. These get dirty very quickly so will need changing twice a day or even more frequently if you have a messy bunny!

Some bunnies are fussy about what TYPE of water they have! Usually, normal tap water in the UK is ok. But some bunnies prefer filtered or bottled water. Make sure you know approx how much your bunny drinks daily so you can notice any changes in habit as this could point towards a health problem.
Originally posted at 6:01AM, 19 March 2012 PST (permalink)
mossbinky edited this topic 55 months ago.

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jojo79 is a group administrator jojo79 says:

bump
95 months ago (permalink)

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mossbinky says:

jo thanks for this it's brilliant. so helpful to refer to, and i'm glad to see the babies/young buns included again. it must have been a labour of love to complete and rejig such a lot of information. what would we do without you. snorgles.
Originally posted 95 months ago. (permalink)
mossbinky edited this topic 95 months ago.

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mossbinky says:

i wanted to mention this pelleted food/supplement www.vetuk.co.uk/rabbit-supplies-pet-rabbit-care-c-649_197...

i' ve found that all my bunnies like it, and it has been invaluable for beau with his MC gut in that it's all he'll eat now pellet wise. the rest of them have a bit sprinkled in their hay for foraging. it is dandelion flavoured and smells nice and grassy. i really like this product for use in conjunction with normal pellet, or in the case of fussy eaters or bunnies with difficult guts to be used daily? any comments welcomed.
Originally posted 95 months ago. (permalink)
mossbinky edited this topic 95 months ago.

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enbee401 is a group moderator enbee401 says:

I'd like to add a bunny water bowl suggestion. I tried Apples with a heavy bowl of water... He used it to mop my floors ;). I found water bowls that mount to the vertical bars of his pen. I think they can also be configured to horizontal bars. Once you have the mount secure, you twist the crock part to secure it or remove it. I find it's easier for me to put the bowl back on while it's empty and then pour water in. I love it! I found this link:

www.petco.com/product/6987/Lixit-Carrier-Cage-Crock.aspx
Originally posted 95 months ago. (permalink)
enbee401 edited this topic 95 months ago.

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sophisticat is a group moderator sophisticat says:

Protexin is scrummy, Dani - I've almost tried it myself, it smells so nice :)

I only give it to Saki - it's quite pricey - but I sprinkle a scoop on his mushed carrot each morning and he loves it. I've been using it for about 9 months now, and it's definitely reduced the instances of poopy-butt which I used to get frequently with him, as he eats so little hay.
95 months ago (permalink)

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mossbinky says:

yes it's done the same here for miss moss and buzz. they only get a bit but beau will eat nothing else so he gets it. (empty purse syndrome)
95 months ago (permalink)

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jojo79 is a group administrator jojo79 says:

Thanks Dani - glad you like it! Some of the links are to pages that are still under construction...but its getting there!
95 months ago (permalink)

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mommy25bunnies says:

Jo, can bunnies eat radish tops? I'm growing icicle radishes & they have big, green, yummy looking tops. Also, can they eat beet tops?
92 months ago (permalink)

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Lopeared says:

i must be tired long day at work, i read it as A MAN GUIDE TO EATING AND DIET lol
92 months ago (permalink)

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mossbinky says:

mommy, bunnies absolutely adore radish tops! at least they do here, they can also eat beet tops i think but mine dont seem to like them.
92 months ago (permalink)

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mommy25bunnies says:

Thanks, moss! I live on the east coast of the U.S. & the gardens are going crazy right now. It'll be fun to eat the radishes & give them tops, just like I do with carrots from the garden.
92 months ago (permalink)

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mossbinky says:

same here at the moment, mine are getting roses, mint, oregano, lots of grass, everything is growing like mad! it's a relief after the cold spring.
92 months ago (permalink)

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jojo79 is a group administrator jojo79 says:

Bump
84 months ago (permalink)

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jojo79 is a group administrator jojo79 says:

bumped
78 months ago (permalink)

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mossbinky says:

bumping for pinky earl, pam and anyone with a new or young bun, for info on bunnies younger than a year. which reads

>>PLEASE NOTE:
Rabbits under 1 year old should be fed a different diet! They need to have unlimited access to good quality alfalfa or timothy based pellets and an unlimited supply of a mix of timothy and alfalfa hay (until they are 6 months old and longer if they are large / giant breeds). Fresh veg, herbs etc should not be introduced to the diet until the rabbit is at least 3-4 months old and should be done very slowly. Once the rabbit is between 6-10 months old you can start to reduce the number of pellets and increase the amount of fresh food. This will ensure that the rabbit has all of the nutrients needed to grow well - but not get fat by over eating a rich diet!<<
Originally posted 69 months ago. (permalink)
mossbinky edited this topic 69 months ago.

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mossbinky says:

another new pellet from burgess excel, this one's called Nature's Blend and all the binkys really seem to like the extra flavours in it. www.thehayexperts.co.uk/excel-nature-s-blend-adult-rabbit...

[natures_blend]
49 months ago (permalink)

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hoarseman1 says:

Nice free download about rabbit nutrition:
dontdumprabbits.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/RabbitNutr...
36 months ago (permalink)

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Space is a lonely town says:

Looking over this rabbit nutrition summary:
wabbitwiki.com/wiki/Nutrition_for_rabbits

and also after looking into the differences between Oxbow's now discontinued Science Diet (in favor of the upcoming Garden Select), I'm wondering about modifying my rabbit's diet a bit.

He's 4lbs, a dwarf lionhead. Relatively long-haired, and very long haired in certain areas. This guide says that for long-haired rabbits, protein level should be higher. I've been feeding 1st cut Timothy hay (7% protein by Oxbow!) and Oxbow Science Diet pellets (12% protein). I wonder if I should also add a bit of Alfalfa hay into the mix, for a protein boost? The guide mentions 12-16% for general pet rabbits, and up to 17-20% for long-haired rabbits.

Another thing written in that guide is the fat levels should be 2-5% for general rabbit variety and 4-8%(!) for long haired varieties. Thunder, as a lionhead, is semi-long-haired. His pellet mix gives only 2.5% fat, and the new substitute Garden Select will have 2% fat. Oxbow's Timothy Hay is listed to have only 1.5% of fat. The evening veg salad is probably relatively low fat as well. Soybean Oil is listed as being a good source of fat for a rabbit. So I also wonder if I should be adding a small amount of that to Thunder's diet.
Originally posted 35 months ago. (permalink)
Space is a lonely town edited this topic 35 months ago.

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hoarseman1 says:

I compared the Oxbow Natural Science to the new Garden Select and except for a big reduction in vitamin A, it's essentially the same thing. I'm unsure about considering a lionhead as a long-haired breed so I wouldn't overdo the protein. I've always stuck with about 11-12% with the pellets and she normally doesn't get a lot of those. Lately she has because she was sick and lost weight, but that might be because I was feeding her 1st cut orchard grass. She liked it but don't know if it was nutritious enough. Alfalfa hay is fine for young and growing rabbits but generally adults (6 months+) don't need it. Pepper is also a lionhead and about 3.5 pounds. Over the years she has been slowly losing all her distinguishing lionhead "bits" and looking more "ordinary". Sorry, Pepper.
Originally posted 35 months ago. (permalink)
hoarseman1 edited this topic 35 months ago.

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Space is a lonely town says:

What do you think of this hay mix as a supplement? The touch of clover bit worries me a bit. But maybe only very small amount is okay.
www.farmerdavepetsupply.com/hay/first-cut-spring-medley-f...
35 months ago (permalink)

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hoarseman1 says:

Space is a lonely town:

Maybe a touch of clover. A little white clover is nothing to worry about, red is the iffy one but both are very rich so tiny amounts if any.
35 months ago (permalink)

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Space is a lonely town says:

Anyone aware of any changes made to Supreme foods that would affect the content/quality more recently? I know they had changed the hamster food that used to be really good-to-best one the USA market (Harry/Hazel Hamster) but became not one of the recommended foods. Just checking before I try Supreme Science Selective Rabbit Food for Snow, slowly switching from Oxbow Garden Select (which used to be called Science Diet). The reason I'm thinking of switching is that Snow might have some kidney issues or poor tolerance to Calcium. He drinks a lot, urinates a lot, and even more so now after a few months on increased amount of pellets (the vet at our last physical appointment insisted that he gets 2x of the pellets he used to get). I was looking into causes for increased thirst and urination and found this page:
www.therabbithouse.com/diet/diet-lowcalcium.asp

The table comparing calcium and phosphorus content and ratios for different commercial foods indicates that Oxbow Garden Select calcium content and ratio is quite variable to be reliable, so I wonder if the batch Snow has been eating happened to be high in calcium. Plus he does get tap water, which has some calcium in it, though I try to give him low calcium veg (will cut out dandelion greens completely).

www.therabbithouse.com/diet/rabbit-food-comparison.asp

Mostly I'm kind of concerned about these reviews... I don't know if they are fake or if the rabbit illness was not related to the food. Sounds a bit shady.
www.amazon.com/Supreme-Petfoods-Science-Selective-Rabbit/...
and
also 2 one-star reviews for the older rabbit version of this food:
www.amazon.com/Supreme-Petfoods-Science-Selective-Rabbit/...

What do you think?

Maybe I should be looking at Supreme Selective naturals Grain Free Rabbit food instead, which contains Timothy hay and no grains. Not sure about alfalfa in the main foods they offer--many reviews on Amazon say how the regular Science Selective food is very addictive to rabbits, and they don't want to eat any other pellets afterwards--my guess is it's because of the tasty aromatic alfalfa content.
Originally posted 6 months ago. (permalink)
Space is a lonely town edited this topic 6 months ago.

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enbee401 is a group moderator enbee401 says:

I don’t have any experience with Supreme. We still feed oxbow adult pellets.
6 months ago (permalink)

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Fordster says:

Space is a lonely town: We give Roux the Supreme Grain Free and he loves it. We also give him the Supreme Vetcare Digestive Support which he also enjoys. You can get a Urinary Support version too but I think the only real difference is the herbs they add which are supposed to help either the digestive or urinary systems (there is a small difference in calcium content and fibre too). The grain free has no alfalfa and the main ingredient is timothy hay.

I’ve seen (and heard) bad things about Supreme food but my vet (and her predecessor who was probably the top rabbit vet in the world) said it was the best. My only concerns with it are that it may contain GM soya and that it has linseed in which can bulk up in the digestive system. But it is actually a good source of fibre so as long as there are no existing problems with the digestive process and your buns drink plenty of water it should be okay. I’d never have given it to Benji for example (not that he’d eat it anyway as refused it the one time we tried).

It’s alfalfa hay that is high in calcium and is often labelled as lucerne in ingredients so is easy to miss. For some reason many products have that as the main ingredient. I guess because it is tasty so encourages the rabbit to eat the pellet and they were originally meant for rabbits kept for meat production as a quick and easy way of fattening them up (horrible thought)

My vet always says that although dandelion is high in calcium it’s good for them as it is also a diuretic. But I do find that if I give Roux any as a treat it increases his sludge (and also makes him wee everywhere due to his lack of bladder control).

If Snow is a good hay eater and maintains his weight easily then you could cut out pellets altogether. I don’t understand your vet actually telling you to increase his pellet (unless he was losing weight). Some people actually advocate the “hay and greens” diet as being healthier and more natural but pellet does provide added nutrients and vitamins. shop.rabbitwelfare.co.uk/product/the-hay-and-greens-diet-... (also available from Amazon).

If you’re concerned that calcium is building up and causing sludge which Snow is not able to get out when he pees then you could try expressing his bladder (ask your vet to show your or search for videos online). I have to express Roux twice daily. You can also get diuretic tablets to help keep things going through (our vet prescribes frusemide).
6 months ago (permalink)

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Space is a lonely town says:

Thank you, Fordster, that's very helpful. Sounds like the Supreme Grain-Free is not for Thunder, who is not a great drinker and periodically has dehydration-pre-stasis issues (couple times a year). I try to feed Thunder extra greens through the day when he sheds more and/or when temperatures are warmer, just to make sure he has more intake of liquids. I wonder if I should just stick with Oxbow Garden Select (non-GMO) for both buns and simply continue feeding less of it.

I give an eighth of a cup. Oxbow pellets have feeding instructions of 1/8th cup per 1-4 lb rabbit, and 1/4-1/3 cup for 4-8 lb rabbits. Thunder is almost exactly 4lbs, and I stick with 1/8th cup for him, especially to make sure he doesn't consume too much without enough liquid to keep it going. Snow is just over 4lbs, and the vet who saw him last was saying he should be getting a quarter of a cup. He's not underweight and is very healthy, but she says he could put on a bit of weight and still be okay. Something about how usually she sees OVERweight rabbits, and mine are lean. I think it's probably a good thing though, as they are active and have a lot of room to run around and don't get any junk food, so maybe she just wasn't used to seeing rabbits in proper condition. I went up to 1/4 cup with Snow and he just started peeing a lot more and drinking more. Since I do see some calcium deposits in his peeing corner--much more compared to almost none for Thunder--I assume he reacts worse to any additional calcium. All of this made me check their pellets and decide to step back down to 1/8th of a cup per day.

Oxbow Garden Select (which used to be called Science Diet) non-GMO:
"Timothy Grass, Oat Grass, Orchard Grass, Oat Hulls, Canola Meal, Whole Barley, Whole Yellow Pea, Tomato Pomace (dehydrated), Calcium Sulfate, Flaxseed, Lignin Sulfonate, Salt, Canola Oil, Sodium Bentonite, Rosemary, Thyme, L-Ascorbyl-2-Monophosphate (Vitamin C), Hydrolyzed Yeast, Inulin, Choline Chloride, Vitamin E Supplement, Yeast Culture (dehydrated), Zinc Sulfate, Zinc Proteinate, Niacin, Copper Sulfate, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Manganous Oxide, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Magnesium Sulfate, Copper Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Manganese Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochlorine, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Carbonate, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Calcium Iodate"

Guaranteed Analysis
Crude Protein (min) 12.00%
Crude Fat (min) 2.50%
Crude Fiber (min) 22.00%
Crude Fiber (max) 26.00%
Moisture (max) 10.00%
Calcium (min) 0.35%
Calcium (max) 0.75%
Phosphorus (min) 0.25%
Vitamin A (min) 10,000 IU/kg
Vitamin D3 (min) 900 IU/kg
Vitamin E (min) 190 IU/kg


Supreme Naturals Grain-Free Rabbit Food
"Timothy hay, soya bean hulls, pea flour, flaked peas, ground soya bean meal, ground dried locust beans, whole brown linseeds, soya bean oil, calcium carbonate, hydrolysed yeast, Yucca extract."

ANALYTICAL CONSTITUENTS
Crude Protein 14.0%,
Crude Fibre 22.0%,
Crude Oils and Fats 4.0%,
Crude Ash 5.0%,
Calcium 0.6%,
Phosphorus 0.4%.
Vitamin A 20000 IU/kg
Vitamin D 2000 IU/kg
Ferrous sulphate monohydrate 50mg/kg
Calcium iodate anhydrous 1.5mg/kg
Copper sulphate pentahydrate 7.5mg/kg
Manganese oxide 30mg/kg
Zinc oxide 100mg/kg
Sodium selenite 0.25mg/kg
6 months ago (permalink)

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Fordster says:

Flaxseed = linseed so they both have this in. It is supposed to help with a shiny coat and is also a good source of fibre. It’s highly unlikely to be in high quantities in either but I had to be very careful with Benji as he had a very rare condition that restricted his intestines so things could easily block up.

It’s very unusual for a vet to recommend a rabbit gaining weight but perhaps as you say she’s used to seeing mostly overweight ones. I always think the best guide is to feel them to check if they are a healthy size and weight. This from the Rabbit Welfare website:
“Deciding if your rabbit is too thin is relatively easy. If you stroke them and their backbone sticks up in a ridge then unless they’re very old) they’re probably too thin. Similarly, it is unusual to feel the hip bones easily except in very slender breeds like Belgian Hares or Polish. A thick winter coat can hide a thin body, or may make an average sized rabbit look fat, so it is important to feel them, rather than just look at them. It can be more difficult to decide if your rabbit is too fat.”

I think I’d do as you have and just stick with the reduced portion of existing Oxbow pellet as you know Snow is okay with that.
6 months ago (permalink)

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Space is a lonely town says:

Using this chart, I would say both Thunder and Snow are in the "ideal weight" category:
www.therabbithouse.com/diet/rabbit-weight.asp

My main concern is that they don't miss out on some vitamins and minerals. I'll look into getting that nutrition book you've linked.
6 months ago (permalink)

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enbee401 is a group moderator enbee401 says:

Does anyone have any experience with joint supplements? I just started Apples on the Oxbow joint support "cookies".
www.oxbowanimalhealth.com/our-products/supplements/natura...
Based on his weight, he should get 2 cookies a day; since he's so prone to tummy issues, I started him on 1/2. If he seems okay, I'll up him to 1/2 AM & 1/2 PM, and then move to 2 cookies a day. He's still pretty active and zoomy at 9+ years old, so I'm hoping to keep any arthritic changes at bay as long as I can.
5 months ago (permalink)

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Fordster says:

We give them to Roux. He has 2 per day which we leave for him overnight. Sometimes he only eats one of them.
5 months ago (permalink)

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enbee401 is a group moderator enbee401 says:

Fordster Thank you! Have you noticed any improvements?
5 months ago (permalink)

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Fordster says:

It’s hard to say as unfortunately Roux has a long list of problems. He tested positive for EC and seems to have nerve damage from that plus an X-ray showed he may have a neck problem causing the spinal cord to get compressed as well as having arthritis in his hips. Tramadol for the pain has made the biggest difference but although his spirit is willing his body seems to be rapidly failing. Which is heartbreaking as he’s still eating fine (mostly, he is more fussy with what he will eat and did lose some weight although regained some of that since) and at times wanting very much to play (he even climbed the stairs last weekend although that probably did him more damage). But he often doesn’t like being touched now and takes himself off to be alone (other times he still very much wants his cuddles). He struggles to get up and down (he hasn’t been able to flop for a very long time) and will often just hover between staring blankly. He has virtually no bladder control now and I have to manually express him twice a day and even then he has accidents (more so when he’s been active). We are facing the very real possibility of having to let him go very soon (we have a routine appointment on Monday as he has to go every month now and it may well be his last). It’s very confusing and upsetting trying to decide what is best for him.
5 months ago (permalink)

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4thirdsOpticalDelusions says:

enbee401:
No experience with the joint supplements specifically, though Minnie did get some Oxbow immune system supplements. When I make "bunny biscuits" I usually add a little turmeric powder, which is generally considered very beneficial to health. Any evidence on my part would be purely anecdotal.
5 months ago (permalink)

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4thirdsOpticalDelusions says:

Fordster:

It’s very confusing and upsetting trying to decide what is best for him.

Been through that far too many times. Hope that Roux's circumstances stabilize and that he is able to enjoy more time with you. Best wishes in that regard from Donut and me.
5 months ago (permalink)

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enbee401 is a group moderator enbee401 says:

4thirdsOpticalDelusions:
Thank you for the input! I will continue giving them as long as there are no negative side effects; at the very least, somebun will enjoy getting an extra "cookie" (he also gets an Oxbow Digestive Tab AM & PM, and a Sherwood Digestive Tab AM only).



Fordster: Sending vibes for a positive vet visit Monday. Hugs to you all.
5 months ago (permalink)

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BunnyRabbitGirl88 says:

Fordster: I'm so sorry to hear about that. I can understand how stressful and emotional it must be for you to think about the upcoming vet visit. Wishing you all the best for Monday, and I hope that Roux can continue to live his royal pampered laidback life with you for some longer, with the good days outnumbering the difficult ones.
Please give the sweet boy a nice big (gentle) hug from me!
4 months ago (permalink)

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We are Bunny! says:

enbee401:

I give Flossy and Herbie the Oxbow joint support cookies. Flossy has arthritis in her front paw and Herbie just gets jealous!
I think they do help but it's not obvious as you have to give these things time. She's been on them for a few months now and she is definitely livelier than before. This has allowed us to reduce the amount of times I give her metacam.
4 months ago (permalink)

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Albert barnacle says:

might be a useful link for uk buns, I alternate day to day between their sweet green (with a little barley straw for texture) and their timothy rich 5 a day. Albert is picky about his hay but he seems to dig well into these.
4 months ago (permalink)

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