hysterical actor [deleted] 10:37am, 15 January 2013
Can anyone tell me what can I possibly do wrong with post-editing of my food pics? Attaching three here that did not turn out as good as they look like on the screen...We shot these for one local magazine and the quality in print was not great, there was some filter of some sort...but still not sure what am I doing wrong.. pics attached:

[https://www.flickr.com/photos/klfoodstyle/8349029708/in/photostream]
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/klfoodstyle/8256657881/in/photostream]
[https://www.flickr.com/photos/klfoodstyle/8256613181/in/photostream]

Basically I am a self learner in few months I learned all about photography and photoshop. And with photoshop I actually do it more intuitively. I shoot raw files and usually adjust sharpening/details, lens correction, than white balance, exposure, fill light (it is CS5), than contrast, saturation, clearance. Than I continue on jpg file in Photoshop and adjust brightness, contrast again, than do gue/saturation and sharpening again. Than we open new file and change it to 300dpi for print.

I know I did not do great job with empanadas pic as there is an issue with white balance and we did enough sharpening but we shot pics in 3888x2592 resolution pxls, so just now I discovered we can shoot with Canon D60 in much higher resolution 5888x3250, maby this will help in quality too?
If anyone could help I would greatly appreaciate it!

Thanks in advance
Bart
AtlantaTerry Posted 5 years ago. Edited by AtlantaTerry (member) 5 years ago
In my experience with Nikon cameras, RAW files are always one size resolution pixels. It surprises me that Canon offers two sizes of RAW files, so let me ask "are you sure"? But, either way, always go with the largest.

I suspect you may be oversharpening since you mention you did it twice.

What exactly was delivered to the magazine:
JPG or PSD or TIFF?
300 DPI is good but what size in inches or mm? (I believe Photoshop refers to this as the Canvas Size.) It it was too large or too small the magazine may have resized the images you submitted.

What worries me greatly is where you say, "I shoot raw files and usually adjust sharpening/details, lens correction, than white balance, exposure, fill light (it is CS5), than contrast, saturation, clearance. Than I continue on jpg file in Photoshop and adjust brightness, contrast again, than do gue/saturation and sharpening again. Than we open new file and change it to 300dpi for print."

I see several potential problem points here:

1. you sharpened the RAW file when you opened it (too early in the workflow) then you sharpened the JPG. And you repeated other steps such as saturation. Why? Once should have been enough.

2. why would you convert to a JPG in the middle of your workflow? That makes no sense. The only file you should be working on is the native Photoshop PSD. When everything is complete, then you create a JPG, if needed.



You wrote about the magazine, "there was some filter of some sort...". Don't ask us, talk to the people at the magazine. Ask them what they need for future projects.



Do not forget that every time a JPG is opened then saved (not merely closed) information is thrown away. Every time. That is why it is called a "lossy" format. As a working professional it is the last thing you want to be editing. Instead, use a TIFF or better yet a Photoshop PSD file format for your critical work.



Be sure you calibrate your monitor. As a working professional photographer this is an absolute if you want to deliver the best and most accurate images for clients.



About the food photographs. The Red Lentil, Red Pepper and Coconut Soup looks cold and congealed (look at the surface). Was it piping hot when you clicked the shutter? Or had it been sitting for a minute or two? It makes a difference.

It may be a matter of style, but to me those two red peppers and the colorful fabrics pull my eyes away from the subject of the photo - the soup. Props and fabrics should be subordinate (secondary) to the "hero" of the piece.

The sausage rolls and empanadas both look a bit dry. Next time try using a small paint brush to apply a bit of thin oil (peanut) to give them some life.
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