Discussions (62)

My first animated music video

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rob.christianson says:

Hi everyone. I'm Rob, an illustrator from Seattle. I'm new to this group.

Until last year, I hadn't done much animation outside of GIFs and old anims on my Amiga 500 with DeluxePaint.

I work for a video producer and we make training videos. Last year they asked me to do an animated music video for them, and learn AfterEffects in the process. It was hard, but fun.

Here's the result if anyone wants to check it out:

Good Company

I'm open to any feedback, as my next video project is coming up soon!
10:04AM, 7 April 2008 PDT (permalink)

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trfcnte™ says:

cool man, I love it...
ages ago (permalink)

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ccogua says:

this is my last video... just animation for fun
www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCWXuYyvosk

this video is not mine, but i love it
www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3w0PeUqjuE

just do animation rob and enjoy, i want to se your other works
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
ccogua edited this topic ages ago.

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rob.christianson says:

thanks! it got rotten reviews on YouTube, but that's not the target audience anyways ;)
ages ago (permalink)

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ian_animator says:

nice job for first time.

main negative comment (for you to think about for the next one) is that I didn't get much depth. It was all flat on, very samey cut to cut staging. this is the safe way to go and it isn't wrong, just thought you could make it more interesting by mixing in some bigger perspectives, have some of the people much closer to camera, some further away. Use AE's lighting to give shadow, I don't mean it has to be dark, but somethng to take it out of the flat screen look.

for me this was the equivalent of an economical talking heads interview, which gets boring real fast, so next step is to study cinematography and see how some of the great directors mess it up a bit to bring a new dimension to the scenes.

Hope that helps or at least starts the brain ticking over
ages ago (permalink)

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rob.christianson says:

No thats good, thanks Ian. It was my first foray into video as well as After Effects, and while it worked well incoporating the dancers' greenscreen footage into my photoshop illustrations, I know what you mean.

The flatness tends to play to my illustration style, as I've taken a great deal of inspiration from Looney Tunes and Hanna Barbara cartoons I've grown up with, as well as that being the general art direction for the show.

As I work more with video, I will be really looking at cinematography, lighting, etc. Thanks for your great feedback.
ages ago (permalink)

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rob.christianson says:

ccogua,

If you go to www.youtube.com/robforgod you can see more of my other stuff. It's the same flat quick illustration paper-cut-out style. I created one 3 minute video per week for a children's church cartoon I was teaching.
ages ago (permalink)

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ian_animator says:

I liked the basic landscape design. Kind of fuzzy felt kit, which was nice.

It also helps me illustrate what I was talking about. Take the section where the protagonist talks about washing the car. Why not cut to a big close up of the car so we see some dirt, or the woman talking about her nails, we don't get to see her nails so the reference is a bit obscure. Highlighting the script with close ups does 2 thngs. It illustrates the point (especially for young kids) that the car is dirty or the woman has beautiful nails BUT also gets us moving the camera into the group. The down side of keeping everything as wide and medium long shot is that we cannot feel that we belong to the story. That's why mixing up the shots is so important in story telling. You establish with a wide shot, then become one of the gang with mid and close shots, with P.O.V. shots, going wide for action plus add dynamics with camera moves*. None of this process has anything to do with illustration style, so you will be ok to stay exactly as you are with your natural style, but you will want to connect and that's when making use of the camera comes up trumps.


* dynamics with camera moves: What I mean there is that if you're at a fair ground and some guy uses the hammer to hit the pad to try and ring the bell at the top of the tower (you know the thing I mean - I don't know what it's called) if you lock the camera the power and weight of the hammer has to come from the animation. However, even the best animation will look better if at the point of impact you add a north - south camera shake, perhaps with a little crash zoom to highlight the hammer hit, it has the effect of being the blink your eyes might do if you were there, having the little body jerk as you flinch at the sound or power, if you were there.

Getting to grips with staging and camera methods will give you a huge lift in what you do, try not to move the camera because you are bored with the shot and think you need to push the pace. A straight cut or cutaway is better than an aimless camera move which I think you were guilty of, but when there's a reason, boy, it lifts the shot.

Good luck with it all.

IAN
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
ian_animator edited this topic ages ago.

ancient chickens [deleted] says:

I like your work, you might like this group... Flickr~Tube
ages ago (permalink)

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