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Dell Mini Inspiron

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tman3 says:

Dell is in the new mini notebook game. It comes in red too Vance!

gizmodo.com/393815/exclusive-dell-mini-inspiron-their-fir...
7:35AM, 29 May 2008 PDT (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

I do like the red, but it appears the keyboard is more Eee-like than HP mini-like. But I'll keep an eye on it. Maybe it'll have good battery life.
72 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

I find it interesting that some of the notes on other pages refer to it as the "Eee PC Killer." LOL!

(The shiny red is nice, though!)
72 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Vance, I disagree - the keyboard tops look bigger to me from the photos than the Eee.

The key thing about this machine is that it is likely to drive much larger adoption of this class of computer into businesses.

David.
72 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

Good point about the key tops. I was just looking at the fact that the board didn't stretch to the edges of the machine like the HP. Maybe there's more real estate to begin with, though. Did anyone see a screen size?
72 months ago (permalink)

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KeesvL is a group administrator KeesvL says:

I couldn’t find any technical details, but by the looks of it, I would think it’s a 9" screen.
What a color can do! :-)
72 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

Next Tuesday's Computex in Taiwan promises the debut with specs of a bunch of these mini notebooks including the Dell, an eeePC with a 10" screen (and maybe bigger keyboard), the MSI Wind, the Acer Aspire One, and others. This category of laptop is about to get very interesting and hopefully price competitive.
72 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

Drat, and I just moved from Taiwan...

Upon further inspection, the keyboard design is quite interesting, and might be very useable. It saves space by getting rid of dedicated keys for some of the lesser used punctuation marks on the left of the board. Those are done with function combos. So the keys can be bigger, although the way they are tiled might be a bit tricky to adapt to. (The entire QWERTY row is shifted slightly to the left.)

If battery life and mobile performance is good, the Dell mini might be mightier than the HP mini. I'm keeping my eye on it, that's for sure.
72 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

More deets on the Mini Dell, including some info on the keyboard:

apcmag.com/up_close_with_dells_mininote.htm

Looks like it'll be touch-typeable and yet really small. Nice!
71 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

whoa...$299. Sounds like a real Eee-killer. And an instant-on OS! Wahoo!

www.engadget.com/2008/07/15/evidence-mounts-for-august-ee...
Originally posted 70 months ago. (permalink)
vrf (a group admin) edited this topic 70 months ago.

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Hmmm.... I want to see the keyboard for this one....
70 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

Surprisingly, the Acer mini machine is already in Malaysia, I saw it in at least 2 shops the other day. The keyboard is almost full-size, but the external shell is very shiny with lots of fingerprints.
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

The Dell E isn't made by Acer it's made by a company called Compal out of Taiwan. I agree Vance, instant on would be fantastic. I suspect this function will be the Linux distro and not XP. And $299 will probably get you Linux, 4 gb SSd, 512 MB ram, 4 cell battery claiming ~5 hours, camera plus choice of colors! Not bad for mobile web surfing, emails, light word processing. Knowing Dell, you'll certainly be able to upgrade with plenty of options. And that can add up fast. But there's also the famous Dell coupons and sales...so all in all I think this is great news for people looking for a mini notebook. Myself, I'm waiting for the Dell E Slim. Bigger screen--12"--for these failing eyes and only 0.8" thick. Watch out MacBook Air. I think by Christmas this market segment will be somehwat shaken out and have huge holiday sales. Economy be damned.
70 months ago (permalink)

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typebarsmack (Steve) says:

The display on the small Dell E is 8.9" wide. Makes me wonder if the keyboard is that wide. The Dana's keyboard is 10.75" wide. I'd hate to go smaller.

Steve
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

Me too. That's why the E Slim seems like a better machine for me. Just hope they can keep the weight down to under 3 lbs.
70 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

tman3 - I was just mentioning another machine that I saw recently. I didn't say Acer and Dell are the same.
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

Oh, sorry Chet, misunderstood.
70 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

No problem, tman3. Peace.

So, let's see - besides the ASUS range, there's now also similar machines from HP (MiniNote), Acer (One Inspire) and MSI (Wind).

I've seen all three. It would happen that after I buy the ASUS eeePC 900, all three are now available in shops in my neighbourhood! Austruck - you'll be interested to know all three sport very user-friendly keyboards.

Both the HP and MSI offer regular HDs. The Acer offers an 8-gig SSD. The MSI is the largest with a 10" screen. But when closed, you can see the keys in the space between the two halves of the clam shell. That bothers me (or maybe I'm just looking to console myself for not having waited ... )

I find different things I don't like about the 3 machines that are now available after I bought the ASUS eeePC. Do I regret not waiting just that little bit longer? It's the story of my life - the first computer I bought back in 1993 was top-of-the-line with a 128MB HD. A week later, something new came along (I can't even remember what it was) and the price fell and my top-of-the-line computer fell to bottom-of-the-heap.

Please believe me when I say I really like my ASUS eeePC 900. I bought it when I needed to, not a second too early or too late. I have promised myself to use it for a year before looking at another machine. It does what I need it to do, plus it's light and not very eye-catching, which is what I like. Plus, I conquered the keyboard in less than 3 days, learning to use the left shift key which was what was giving me the most typos (and headache).

This group is growing and diversifying into other writing tools. Some of us have the ASUS, others the HP or MSI, and soon more will join in as new owners of Acers and Dells.

Sorry for the long post.
Originally posted 70 months ago. (permalink)
Chet_ edited this topic 70 months ago.

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d_b_cohen says:

Chet,

Don't fret that gap on the MSI Wind. It is there to ensure the keytops don;t mark the screen (which is a real pet peeve of mine.

Sadly (I am SO bad), I have owned most of these machines, except the Acer. Loved the original Eee, liked the improvements on the 900, and LOVED the design and keyboard of the HP.

However, each of these machines had compromises - the keyboards on the Eee(s), the screen on the smaller Eee, the processor on the HP. The MSI Wind has none of these - it is fast, good-sized and with a good display. I am now using a PC World rebadge of the device that was not much more to buy than the original Eee, but has all of those advantages.

David.
70 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

David, you are like the budgie sent into the mines. We who huddle upon fences salute you!

When you tell me the air is clear, and the millet is good value, I shall listen carefully - maybe not 'buy it now', but certainly listen carefully.
70 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

David, how do you like the keyboard on the Wind, compared to the HP?
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Vance, the keyboard on the Wind is great. It has more travel than the HP, though the keytops are slightly smaller.

Overall, it is a different experience the the HP, but just as good. Certainly very useable and a million miles away from the Eee. Now, I could manage on the Eee's keyboard, but this is MUCH easier.

Actually, what finally pushed me away from the HP wasn't the anaemic processor performance (which was actually OK for most things) - but the resolution of the screen. It is too high for an 8.9 inch diagonal - I found my vision feeling fatigued if I used it for more than two or three hours at a time. Again. the Wind at 1024x600 and 10 inches is more useable, even though there is less real estate to play with.

I use the Advent/Wind as my main work laptop now - loving the fully functional laptop profile in that very light package. And I have just found out it will happily run OS X, which is even better!

Actually, today I worked for three hours in a cafe with Neo, iPhone and BlackBerry. The limitations of the mobile devices were just enough to minimise the overall distraction level.

David.
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

David--

What! The MSI Wind will run OS X? Please explain how.

Tom
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

A full guide can be found at snipurl.com/osx-wind

The only real caveat is the wifi - no OSX drivers for the Wind's inbuilt card. However, it is modular, and can be simply replaced with a Dell card that OS X sees as an Airport device.

Finally, the disclaimer is that this is a breach of the OS X license agreement. One should as a minimum have a separate copy of OS X purchased for doing this, but even so, Apple does not authorise one to install it on MSI hardware.
Originally posted 70 months ago. (permalink)
d_b_cohen edited this topic 70 months ago.

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

How would the boot time be with OSX? Any better than a slimmed down XP install?
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

Sounds a little shaky to me, don't think I personally would want to mess around with that, I'd be worried about stability, drivers, other issues, but thanks for the info anyways.
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Well, Tom, I'll be trying it out very shortly. I will let you know how I get on, and how easy and stable it is.

Vance, there are plenty of YouTube videos available from the guys doing this. Looks like the cold boot time is around 30 seconds. The advantage that XP gives you for system starts is hibernation support, which can't be done under OS X without an EFI ROM (which most PCs don't have).

David.
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

MSI Wind now running OS X.


70 months ago (permalink)

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Hookmt says:

Very Nice. Apple is missing a bet by not coming out with a low end laptop to go with their low-end Brick.

(Apple missing a bet = They have the nerve to not come out with the package I want at the price I want. I don't think Steve is being kept awake nights.) ;-)
70 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

Very cool, David.

There have been rumblings of an Apple netbook, something between an iPhone and a Macbook Air. If true, and they offer up a mini Macbook Air with a snappy iPhone-esque OS, I may be unable to resist the purchase.

www.businessweek.com/technology/ByteOfTheApple/blog/archi...

education.zdnet.com/?p=1772

I'm also looking forward to seeing what the Dell is like.
Originally posted 70 months ago. (permalink)
vrf (a group admin) edited this topic 70 months ago.

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triciawriting says:

Cool, David. :) How much functionality does it have? Anything not working? Does the trackpad have multigestures? I'm guessing not on that last one because I believe that is hardware dependent (could be wrong, of course).

Do other networked computers see it as another Mac? Not sure I'd trust my writing to it, but everyday stuff would be fine.
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Functionally everything built in to the machine works except the 3.5mm audio jacks. And I had to change the internal wireless card for one that OS X can use - was as easy as changing the RAM and the card was $25 off eBay.

Bluetooth, hotkeys for wireless and audio, graphics, keyboard layout etc. all works fine. Sleeps when the lid is shut. Battery meter works and is accurate. No multi-touch because of the hardware (but hey, my MacBook doesn't support that either!).

Yes, it appears on the network as a Mac - it IS a Mac, just a small and cheap one. Macs are just PCs in pretty clothes nowadays, you know. No reason to be shy about trusting anything to it - I am using it as my main work machine now, so I'll let you know if anything goes south.
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

David--

That is really impressive. Besides, swapping out the wireless card, how difficult was it to install? How long did it take? Was it as simple as inserting the OS X disc and letting it do its thing? You suggest that you can install OS X on any machine with an Intel processor. Am I reading you correctly?

Tom
70 months ago (permalink)

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jim_panza says:

Very interesting but I think the keyboard is too small. I feel that smaller computers are a good things are not as good because things like the keyboard has to be smaller and it is easer to hit two keys at one time screwing up what you are wrighting.
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Tom,

Took about two hours start to finish. I needed to use a modified version of Leopard 10.5.2 and the updater for 10.5.3 - you can't use the stock stuff. It's just that the hardware in the Wind is particularly suitable, which made it slightly easier. I was using a methodology proven to work on the Wind, and made sure I had all the right modified software up front.

Sitting down and pulling it off with a standard PC cold takes another level of Geek Fu that I am not capable of! But potentially, it is possible.

Jim, the keyboard is nearly full size on this because the chassis is 10" wide. Typing is not an issue.

David.
70 months ago (permalink)

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tman3 says:

David--

This MSI Wind gets more and more interesting! Glad to hear the keyboard is not an issue. What about screen size and resolution? These eyes are getting old...

Tom
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Screen is large for this class at 1024 x 600 over 10 inches. Really no problem to read at all.

David.
70 months ago (permalink)

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scribbler1382 says:

A franken-mac made of an iphone and a MacAir sounds like a great idea, but if Apple makes it expect a price tag of about $900.
70 months ago (permalink)

SpizzleWit [deleted] says:

I'm interested to see that the PCWorld site shows this model with an Apple OS X wallpaper!!! Subliminal or what...?
70 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Actually, all of the computers on the PC World site have the blue default OS X wallpaper from 10.4.

I don't think they are all Mac compatible..
70 months ago (permalink)

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jim_panza says:

O ok see I was not sure of the keyboard's size. I remember the Sony VIO minim's keyboard is too small and you are able to hit a bunch of keys at the same time. That is where I got confused with small keyboards.
70 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

It's official... $349 for Linux version.

www.engadget.com/2008/09/04/dells-inspiron-mini-9-pops-of...

Red not... ready, I guess. Maybe later.
Originally posted 68 months ago. (permalink)
vrf (a group admin) edited this topic 68 months ago.

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Hookmt says:

Here's the Dell page-- they may be still building it because it doesn't load right on my work computer, but that could be my work computer...

www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx/laptop-...
Originally posted 68 months ago. (permalink)
Hookmt edited this topic 68 months ago.

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Hmm, interesting. I think if it were me, I'd spring for fifty bucks more and get the XP edition and double the storage space.

Oh, and what's the bit about 2GB of online storage space? Hmmm....

Still happy with the eeePC, but if I were buying now instead of when my laptop died in February, I'd *seriously* consider this one. I do wish I had XP on this baby or had the courage to try to install it.
68 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

You can actually upgrade the Linux edition to an 8 or 16 GB SSD right on their page, and with double the RAM, too. You can keep Linux and not have the web camera. I'll be anxious to see reviews on batt life, boot time and the keyboard.

If someone were looking to buy a "full" Dell system, they'll give you the Mini for $99. Nice.
68 months ago (permalink)

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Oldwoodchuck says:

How much RAM does XP Home take, all bits considered? Could you get along with 8GB? By the same token, does it run OK on 512MB? The Windows box I'm most familiar has only 512 I think, but I'm not sure. But it's OK with XP Home. Sprightly, in fact, for WP and browsing.

The battery is small; 32 W-Hr is not big, and what I've heard about the Atoms is that they are not the power sippers they were hoped to be.

Is there a hack to allow you to slow the clock? Maybe to half? Might get a good gain that way, and for stuff like WP you wouldn't notice.

I recently got convinced that if I maxed the RAM in my 2.1 GHz G5 iMac my life would be endless and speedy sunshine. So I went from 512 MB to 2.5 GB, and ... uhh ... hmmm. Oh, well, it wasn't that expensive. And maybe Photoshop is a tiny bit more responsive when I have open honking enormous files in Photoshop. Maybe.

So I know you don't need a lot of speed or RAM to have a usable machine. And the package size is nice. Now about that battery ...
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Vance (and OWC), I don't upgrade the eeePC to XP because on the main eeePC user forum, I see little more than confusion and errors from folks who've tried it. (They usually try to slim down the installation in some way since the eee has 4GB to begin with.)

I may have been around computers a long time, but I'm not a hacker wannabe so I shy away from things like over/underclocking and weird tweaks like that. One glitch along the way and I'd be lost.

Someday I might try it, though. The eeePC has a fairly easy "reset" to get it back to factory defaults, and I don't really have much personalized info or data on the thing even now.

However, that slimmed-down XP is also a monkey wrench in the system....

OWC, yeah, on my desktop, I upgraded my RAM from its original 512MB to 2GB ... and the only thing I've seen work differently are the PC adventure games, which are often graphics intensive, and the online game Guild Wars. I don't overly multitask to begin with, so I knew the games were the only things that would likely benefit from the extra RAM -- and the occasional streaming video.
68 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Linda,

There is really little need to slim down XP for the Eee the way the "leet guys" on the forums try to do. I installed the full version of XP Pro without issue - takes around 2.5Gb. Stick a fat card in the SD slot for data, and you are sorted.

Slimming XP down with nLite when you don't know what you are doing is a recipe for disaster. Hence the problems - most forum monkeys decide on a size they absolutely must get to, and then throw out the baby with the bathwater getting there.

A better option for a slimmed down install is one of the pre-built images like TinyXP. Using those, you know everything will work properly, and the missing bits are supplemented with other apps to fill in the gaps, while not being a MS bloat hog (TM David Cohen 2008).
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Well, gee ... I *have* a legit copy of XP (Home) that I could use on the eeePC... Really? You did this? So, how the heck did you do it? External CD drive (which I don't have)?

Hubby likes to install software over the home network, and I've done this and it works fine ... but I've never tried it with an OS. I seem to remember that, once you plunk the install CD into a CD drive on one of the computers in the network, it assumes that's the computer you want it on.

Is there a way around this without buying a dedicated free-standing external CD drive?
68 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Well, it can be done with a large flash drive, but you are in the realms of hackery trying to get that sorted.

External drive is definitely the way to go - works straight away without any hassle. You can get a USB enclosure fairly cheap, and then pull the drive from a desktop PC and use that. Or if you buy the enclosure and a bare drive separately, the cost is lower than buying a commercial unit.

But I do appreciate that all might be too much cost or hassle for the sake of one OS install. You will not be able to do it over the network, alas.

Do you have any one you could borrow one from?

David.
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Actually, your mention of the USB enclosure reminded me that hubby DOES do that from time to time with internal hard drives. (We are awash in spare computer parts of all types.) We do have such enclosures ... and yes, we already do have various types of CD drives. He's a hardware geek, so I should just ask him to jury-rig something for me.

Thanks for the idea ... it just might work. :)
68 months ago (permalink)

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triciawriting says:

Apparently, this little gem comes with 3G built-in:

Mention on Gizmodo
68 months ago (permalink)

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James Inglis says:

David, if I can hijack your brain for a second. If I want to install XP to the eee do I have to format the eee or will the XP process take care of that?

Linda in the worse case just how would I reset the eee to the original settings?
68 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Casca,

Part of the Windows install process is an option to reformat the drive.

To return back to stock settings, you just boot of the supplied DVD in the box. It will wipe the drive and reinstall the dedicated Eee Linux distribution.

David.
68 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

The instructions for the XP installation are in the eeePC owner's manual.
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Well, I won't attempt this before my upcoming England trip (it's doing what I need it to do for the trip -- email and web -- but I will definitely attempt this once I get back. I had just been assuming that a "regular" XP installation wouldn't even work.

I do have an 8GB SDHC card in the SD slot, which is where I put all my documents already, so I have plenty of room for data space and can "use up" a fair amount of the SSD space for XP...

Hmmm......
68 months ago (permalink)

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James Inglis says:

I hit an ALL STOP situation before I've even started. I got out by XP disk and saw it was SP1 version. EEEPC manual says I need SP2 version. Any thoughts guys?
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Dunno about that, Casca. I'll ask hubby, though, who hit a similar wall once, as I recall, on another computer in the house.....
68 months ago (permalink)

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Oldwoodchuck says:

There are ways to stream SP 2 into an installation disk without it, but on a quick glance it looked too much bother for an Apple guy to mess with. I want to spend my discretionary time writing, not geeking. Perhaps one of the more informed can point you to a step-by-step that you'll put up with to get it done.

It can be done, and for free. You just have to make the call.
68 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Back to the topic of this thread (wait -- there's a topic to these threads?) ... I got an email from Dell today (I'm on their mailing list) about the Mini Inspiron. Looks lovely ... and for the same price as I paid for the eeePC, the Mini has twice the storage space and XP already on it.

As I've said, if I were buying now instead of six months ago, this'd be HIGH on my list. (Don't like the shiny lid, though. Looks too easily scratched up and scraped.)
68 months ago (permalink)

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Oldwoodchuck says:

I gotta say, that's a cute little buggerlette. I just wish that Dell didn't have such a rotten hardware reliability record. On the other hand, a recent large scale survey found that they have escalated their customer service from abominable to OK. The hardware hadn't gotten much better at that point, but that might be in the works. Just takes the will, and it seems that Dell may be trying.
68 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Casca,

It is trivial to produce a slipstreamed SP3 with nLite - a one-click process.

snipurl.com/slipsp3 [lifehacker_com]

Just follow the instructions, and ignore the rest of the fiddling detail after you have done the SP3 bit.

As far as the shiny lid is concerned, there are several services that for not much money will make a custom sticker with a design of your choosing that custom its to these sort of machines, and protects the lids. For instance,

www.skinit.com

has a service that covers the MSI Wind, another shiny-topped machine, and they cover a wide range of Dells. I am sure the Mini 9 will be added once it ships.

Oldwoodchuck, my business and several of my largest clients use Dell machines, and the Latitude line available for the last 18 months is really very reliable. In fact, my work-supplied D630 dropped from an open bag onto a concrete car park floor, and apart from a few scratches was unharmed.

David.
Originally posted 68 months ago. (permalink)
d_b_cohen edited this topic 68 months ago.

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James Inglis says:

David thanks for all the information. I have copied them down. After looking at the steps I'm feeling it is a little out of my comfort level so I will put it on the back burner for now.
68 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

Ooo... this guy loaded up OSX on the Dell mini. Seems to work well all around.

uneasysilence.com/archive/2008/10/13519/

I still wonder if Apple is going to jump in this market. Oct 14th there's a big Macbook event, new models and such, with rumours that a device that is code-named the "Brick" might actually be an Apple netbook.

If this mockup were real, I'd have a difficult time keeping my credit card in my wallet...
www.flickr.com/photos/nevember/2914121167/
67 months ago (permalink)

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KeesvL is a group administrator KeesvL says:

And I would have a serious talk with my wife! ;-)

The eeePCs and Dells running on OSX are all very nice, but I guess I’m just too timid for that, and not knowledgeable enough to solve the problems that will surely come up. Besides, it would be illegal (as “someone” argued).
67 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

Apparently, the eeePC is not powerful enough to run OSX. Or maybe that was just the earlier Celeron. Maybe now the Atom processor can handle it.

The Dell looks nice, but still only sports a 9" display. I'm still using my eeePC 900 but will upgrade to a 10" display for my next netbook. Maybe by then, Dell will have a 10" model? But the price has to be within my budget, too.
67 months ago (permalink)

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d_b_cohen says:

Vance, no surprise that the Dell can run OSX - all of these Atom processor machines are broadly the same at the motherboard level. As well as it runs on the Wind, it will run as well on the Dell. The Dell has a few too many compromises in the keyboard department for me, from the five-minute play I got with one.

Both the 9" and 10" machines have the same resolution, in the main - 1024 x 600. I would suspect Apple would up that for an OS X Netbook. The mock-up looked very nice - but an Apple machine is going to be a lot more expensive, I would have thought. The low price is part of the appeal for me - otherwise I would have a MacBook Air already... :-)

David.
67 months ago (permalink)

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redfox1477 says:

Nice work on the MacWind, David - I'm almost jealous!

I just installed Eeebuntu on my Eee900. It looks very cool, the hardware all works, and it boots to the login screen in 35 secs - so pretty close to ideal for me :)
Originally posted 67 months ago. (permalink)
redfox1477 edited this topic 67 months ago.

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cecilia.au says:

I just set eyes on an Eee PC for the very first time today, in my nearest town. (Well ... I do live in the sticks in Australia, so I'm a bit slow to catch up with the trends.) However, having been educated by eveyone else's experiences, I did not reach for my wallet. Thank you, all.

The computer shop had three netbooks - an Eee, a HP and an Acer. No MSI Wind, which was a little disappointing - David has been so enthusiastic about it that had there been one, I might have reached for my wallet :-)

David - the Dell keyboard compromises you mentioned above - what are they?
66 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

A MacHead friend of mine bought a Dell Mini and successfully installed Mac OS on it. I used it for a bit yesterday, the keyboard's nice, and he said Dell Mini is the only netbook to use backlit LED screen, whatever that means.
66 months ago (permalink)

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KeesvL is a group administrator KeesvL says:

I don’t know about other competitors, but I believe the eeePC 1000 also has a screen backlit by LEDs (which is nice because of low power consumption). It has interesting specs (Linux, 40Gb SSD, 6-cell battery supplying up to 8 hrs of use, bigger keyboard etc.). Also, a leading German computer magazine rates it highest of of all netbooks on the market today.
I’d be interested in buying one, but in Germany only the Windows XP version with a traditional HDD is being sold, at the time, so I’d have to get it from the UK. That’s a risk, of course, though the price (under €400) is so reasonable that I might take it.
Later. ;-)
66 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

The netbook that I've been eyeing (HP Mini 1000) does have the LED screen and an SSD, but won't get the 6-cell battery until January. The customized Linux OS won't arrive until then either.

Tick. Tick. Tick.
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

Vance: The Vivienne Tam model? Nice and red!
66 months ago (permalink)

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markokloos says:

"A MacHead friend of mine bought a Dell Mini and successfully installed Mac OS on it. I used it for a bit yesterday, the keyboard's nice, and he said Dell Mini is the only netbook to use backlit LED screen, whatever that means."


A LED display is backlit by (you guessed it) LEDs, instead of a CCFL bulb. LED-backlit displays are relatively new to market. They are more energy-efficient, and they don't require a "warm-up" period before the display reaches its maximum brightness.

Oh, and your friend is incorrect. The Acer Aspire One also comes with LED-backlit displays. I'm actually thinking about buying one, even though I have a perfectly functional MacBook for out-of-the-house computing.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

I have a computer forensics friend who dislikes Acers. Says they're poorly constructed, etc. I'm just sayin'.... I am easy on my technology and would at least give one a fair shake, but I'd have to see it live in person and not just order online sight unseen...

That's one thing I've appreciated about this eeePC: It's been very sturdy and seems rugged, all things considered.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

munchkinwrangler - my MacHead friend is the sort who likes to think he got the best deal and the best machine among all that's available. :)
66 months ago (permalink)

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dougwalkabout is a group administrator dougwalkabout says:

I had a chance to briefly test-drive an eeePC 1000. It's as small as you can go and have a truly productive machine, keyboard-wise.

I'm seriously thinking about buying one. But I would need the XP version to justify it as a work machine, and the best deal is on the standard hard drive version, so it's just another laptop, can I justify that, etc. etc., and round and round I go. I may hold out for the next wave of SSD machines.

In Canada, you can get the HDD version of the eeePC 1000 (XP, six cell) for $460 CAD and the HDD version of the Acer AspireOne (Linux, three cell) for about $300 CAD. Cheap, cheap, cheap.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

(sigh) Today's Toys 'R Us flyer in the paper has an Asus eeePC (unsure of the number), 8GB, Windows version (!!) with a free handled neoprene case, for $299! The Linux version is only $269.

I'm still forcing myself to be just happy that there are so many mini-notes available out there. At this rate I'll never have to go back to a huge laptop... and that thought will keep me from feeling bummed that these better specs at a cheaper price are available nine months after I had to buy one myself.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Hookmt says:

Lol. Toys R Us. Vtech must be pretty annoyed. ;-D
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

I'd always heard from this group that Toys 'R Us sold 'em but this is the first time I've seen that around here personally. Taunting me with their better specs and lower price. LOL
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

And the free Beanie Baby doesn't help any, either. *cough*
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

:-) I can imagine :-)

I must say that actually *seeing* the Eee and two other small machines made me think seriously about whether I'll buy one myself when I can afford it. I have spent the majority of the last seven weeks lying down with a back injury. Having my Neo and Dana enabled me to carry on with the unit I am studying (after a fashion) as far as writing an assignment was concerned. Life would certainly have been easier - and more entertaining - with a little, instant-on laptop, though.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

To be truthful, it's not really instant-on -- not in the manner you are used to with an AlphaSmart. This Linux machine takes at least 1-2 minutes ... including finding the WiFi and also the SD card I added. Still, much better than the Windows version would be, I'm sure.... It's a tradeoff. Mostly I'd rather have access to more of my programs under Windows ... but that is for the *next* mini-note I have to buy *years* from now.
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

I must say, when I saw the little machines, I had to remind myself to ask "What Would Linda Do?" in order to quell the rogue instinct to snap one up whether it was a bargain or not :-) The Beanie Baby though - that would have been almost too much!!

Do you run the Palm Desktop on your Eee? Or use either Alphasmart as an attached keyboard?
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

No Palm stuff on my Linux eee. Just the programs that came with it. And no, I don't use any extra or attached keyboards. I am actually quite used to the eee keyboard and take it at face value. I can even touch type in the dark now without hitting wrong keys anymore. I've even typed for long periods of time without much problem ... although the real "write-ins" require one of the AlphaSmarts for optimal speed and comfort.

Hey, it was tough for me not to run out to Toys 'R Us today and snap up that Windows eee for three hundred bucks. A bargain really -- and twice the SSD space on this eee I'm using right now....

(P.S. I was kidding about the Beanie Baby.) ;-)
66 months ago (permalink)

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Oldwoodchuck says:

If they threw in a guinea pig?
66 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

I, for one, am taking a little jaunt over to CostCo...

www.gottabemobile.com/2008/11/15/hp-mini-1000-at-costco/
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

The guinea pig would have clinched it for me :-)
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Not me. I already have two, and they keep me plenty busy as it is.
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Vance, report back on that Costco trip. :)
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

Yes - I saw your photos and did wish I had some guinea pigs to play with too. Though probably the cat would eat them :-(

However, I shall not say a word against him, as he stunned a snake in the living room last week, which was more than I could have done at the moment. Good chap - fierce hunting cat :-)
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Nice! When I was a teen, we had a cat who helped us snag a bat that was dive-bombing my head in our TV room. Kinda freaked me out ... till the cat jumped up and "grabbed" it with his two front paws and knocked it to the floor to play with it. Needless to say, I skedaddled outside....
66 months ago (permalink)

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Austruck is a group administrator Austruck says:

Oh, errrr, uhhhh, we didn't have mini-laptops back then.... *cough*
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

As my little sisters once asked my mother 'Did you write with a feather when you were little?' :-)

Lovely bat story - our cat would dearly love a nice fresh bat to play with. When he was younger and more optimistic he'd streak up the garden at night if he could get out, and rush straight up the mulberry tree in fruit bat season. Never caught one, luckily.
66 months ago (permalink)

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triciawriting says:

Vance, you are a bad influence! ;) I had to go check out that Acer Aspire One... and yes, I came home with one. It is a sweet little machine - beautiful dark blue, with XP and the 120 GB hard drive. Keyboard is a bit bigger than the EeePC and quite a bit easier to use. The keys all seem to be in the right places, though I haven't taken it out for a long writing session yet. It's still charging at the moment.

Thanks for the heads up. (It also helped that I had two AmEx gift cards demanding to be used.)

Have to say that before I went to Costco, I went to the local Starbucks and wrote for about an hour on my Neo. While the keyboard on my new Aspire One is much nicer than the one on the EeePC, neither one comes close to the Neo's. It is such a dream to write on. :D
66 months ago (permalink)

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Hookmt says:

I've heard very good things from a couple of people who own Acer Aspire Ones.
66 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

But... did you try the HP Mini?
66 months ago (permalink)

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cecilia.au says:

Tricia: That's right - blame Vance:-)

This is a link - below - to a review article in Australia. I'd be very interested in what you think of the Acer once you've had a few weeks to compare it with your Eee. I saw three little machines locally, but didn't try them out. One was an Acer, I think, plus a HP and an Eee. I leaned towards the HP, but would like to see the MSI Wind that David talks about.

www.cnet.com.au/laptops/laptops/0,239035649,339290036,00.htm


Cecilia
66 months ago (permalink)

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Chet_ says:

The ASUS now has a 10" model with a bigger keyboard. I saw it recently and put my fingers on the keyboard and they felt so comfortable.

I lean towards the ASUS because I own an older model which has proved its worth to me. So when I upgrade, I will most likely get the ASUS.

ASUS took the risk to launch its 7" machines and was well rewarded for it. Now other companies are jumping in - they allowed a tiny Asian company to take the risk on their behalf - and the public is benefitting from the choices available now.

I have been asking about selling my 900 but the prices have not been encouraging. I might keep it - the way I'm keeping my AS2000 and AS3000 and my very first (now with broken screen) Dana - and look at getting the 1000.
66 months ago (permalink)

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triciawriting says:

Vance, they had a small HP there, too, but it cost $150 more and had what felt like a smaller keyboard. The specs on it were less as well - the HP had a 60GB hard drive while the Aspire One has a 120GB.

Cecilia - I can already say that the One is a tad larger than the Eee (I have the smallest, the 701). Not by much, but while the Eee fits in an old zip drive case I had, the One doesn't. The keyboard on the One seems to have a more 'real keyboard' feel (so far), but I really haven't given it a good workout yet. I did install Q10 on it (no matter that it seems to have been abandoned) and want to put the older Word on it as well. (I'm not keen on the 2007 Office suite (a 60-day trial comes with it).)

Chet - it is nice to have choices, but wow! now we have what seems like dozens to choose from. Not sure Asus was all that tiny even before they released the Eee. Afaik, Asus was a large OEM manufacturer (building computers for several brands) before they decided to have their own brand. I could be wrong, of course.

After having spent the morning yesterday writing on my Neo, all keyboards are going to seem small. ;) But I think this little One will work out fine for me. The keyboard is comfortable enough to use (and all the keys seem to be in the 'right' place, unlike with the Eee).

Pics, including comparison shots, in a day or so. :)
66 months ago (permalink)

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vrf is a group administrator vrf says:

Okay, so my Costco is like so lame. No Aspire One. No Mini. No Wind, other than that caused by the pizza.

All they had was these big heavy things. Laptops or something.
66 months ago (permalink)

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