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9M Stanchions

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Super Snoopy 050 says:

Gave one of Super Snoopy's stanchions a bit of a biff when we recovered her in October and now we have two smaller bits of stanchion. Does anyone know anything about the stanchion bases? There is a hole which may have a grub screw or allen screw, but I cannot see or feel anything inside. Whatever may be in there is at least 34 years old and likely to be siezed solid. I'd rather not have to take the base off. Any suggestions? Snap uploaded to group photostream.
5:45AM, 28 November 2013 PDT (permalink)

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pjbharrison says:

Hi Alan
Mine had a stainless steel screw in it. Even with it removed, penetrating fluid applied over several weeks and heat applied, it won't budge. I cut it and intend to drill it out. I tried to remove the base too but the SS bolts are seized into the toe-rail.
I'll post some photos of my progress early next week, fingers crossed!
69 months ago (permalink)

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Glandore Marine says:

Hi Alan

I had to replace three of mine a few years ago penetrating oil Coke Cola and heat failed and I ended taking the piece out on a lathe
69 months ago (permalink)

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Super Snoopy 050 says:

None of the ideas seem to be a five minute job then.
69 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

Nothing on a boat is..
69 months ago (permalink)

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rothwell_neil says:

I used a hacksaw blade in a reciprocating saw to cut down the stanchion then persuaded it to move with hammer and screw driver. A right pain. Got the saw when doing the house extension and it is one of those things that are fantastic every so often, rest of the time they sit in the cupboard.
69 months ago (permalink)

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Super Snoopy 050 says:

Finally fixed! Hacksawed it off just above the top of the base - it was hollow. Dug it out with a mixture of Dremel router, 10mm drill, 1/4" cold chisel, 1/2" cold chisel and finally a 25mm diamond hole cutter designed for porcelain tiles. Took in all 12 hours over 4 days atop a ladder. Don't think I'll consider replacing the others as a matter of course.
Originally posted 56 months ago. (permalink)
Super Snoopy 050 edited this topic 56 months ago.

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spearhead_027 says:

Perhaps it would be a good idea to (at least) take all the stanchions out annually? I'm lucky in that some of mine pull out still, whether I mean to do it or not, and so I have to be careful with them at sea.... (The tension on the lifelines normally holds them down quite well)
Despite this, I've never fancied grub screws unless/until the stanchions actually start slopping about.
Ian.
56 months ago (permalink)

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Super Snoopy 050 says:

No grubs crews in any of mine and there's no way that they will come out without absolute butchery, so they'll stay put until I break another one. Hopefully never.
56 months ago (permalink)

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pjbharrison says:

Mine was a solid bar type. Impossible to remove so had to remove base by cutting heads off pan head bolts on the base and punching the rest through. Then had stanchion machined out of base by local engineering firm. Replaced stanchion with a hollow stainless type and secured it with a bolt through base.
56 months ago (permalink)

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Fleur064 says:

Re-arranged one of ours on Newquay wall this summer. On inspection, the centre hole in all the stanchions had become elongated, resulting in serious weakness, so we decided to change them all. Three were seized solid into the bases, and no amount of heat, penetrating oil or guile would shift them. Our solution was to remove the bolts though the deck (glassed into the lockers, but do-able) and drill out the bolts holding the bases to the toe rail. This isn't as bad as it sounds, since you only have to drill the heads off. Once the heads are drilled through to 8mm they break off and the base comes free. Then heat and punch out the remains of the bolt. Seascrew stock the right replacement bolts.
Hold the stanchion in a vice and leave it with a blowtorch on it for a while and eventually the base lets go of the stanchion and out it comes.
Bases cleaned up nicely and replaced, new stanchions sourced direct from Allen Brothers. Not cheap, but hopefully good for another thirty years, particularly since I will take precautions to stop them seizing again.
56 months ago (permalink)

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Red Marlin says:

All my bases are cracked and a job I have been putting off for some time. Thanks for all the tips. Maybe next winter will be the time to stop putting it off.
Tony
55 months ago (permalink)

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Daddsie says:

Same as Super Snoopy, cut off flat and just drill it out. I remove mine as necessary to fill the guard rail holes with aluminium weld then re drill them out. I smother them in green stuff before re assembling them, helps a bit.
55 months ago (permalink)

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willdeere says:

Hi guys,

One of my bases has crumbled to bits. So it appears the best way to handle it is to cut flat to the deck, drill out old base material and put a new stainless one on? Sounds like it's too much work to bother with the others.
45 months ago (permalink)

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spearhead_027 says:

Hi there Will - haven't heard of you before! May I ask which boat you have; a swift look through your photostream reveals no boats at all? You're most welcome anyway.
Yes; remove old remains by undoing or drilling out the bolts, but I don't think you'll be able to find a stainless replacement. Just another alloy one as above. Check them all, of course.......
Ian
45 months ago (permalink)

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A264 Clytie says:

My stanchion broke recently, I cut it flat at base level and drilled it out with a hold saw with a central bit pertruding. Fill the stanchion hollow first with epoxy then drill slowly to establish the right line/angle of cut with the epoxy then allows you to maintain then down you go. Easy to say but what a b'stard of a job. Good luck.
45 months ago (permalink)

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Super Snoopy 050 says:

Old thread, same problem. Why did Chris Butler decide to have the stanchions splaying outwards. If you decide to dry out on a wall, unless you have enormous fenders, the top of the stanchion hits first. Not a problem when you are ocean racing I suppose.
Anyhow, decided to do the Paul Harrison variation this time - remove the base and sort it out at home. Three of the big pan heads came out relatively easily, but the last one is going to need to be drilled out. Nice job for Sunday, hope its not raining.
20 months ago (permalink)

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john lashbrook says:

Having read all that I am very glad the previous owner had them all replaced - even if the do keep getting loose they are easily tightened with a big nit under the tow rail. I suppose I should buy Nylock nuts on them.
20 months ago (permalink)

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