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removing the engine

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phayes2011 says:

I don't have an Achilles yet but am looking. One thing that puzzles me a little is how you would remove and replace the engine from the well while on the water. I know the simple answer is pull it out but I was wondering about the specific process. Looking at photos there does not seem to be alot of clearance between the top of the engine and the tiller. Also on the photos the traveller seems to restrict the tiller from being tilted upwards out of the way while trying to lift out the engine. So what do people do and what works best?

Do people have both sails up at the time, none, one?
Do you have to move the tiller to one side and if so does the boat spin like a top while you are struggling.
Has any one attempted to rig some sort of block and tackle from the boom and does it work.
How do people feed the engine down the companionway without thumping everything.
Has anyone attempted to store the engine forward opposite the galley? Does this have any effect on foreaft trim and how sensitive is an Achilles to fore aft trim?
If people store the boat under the cockpit how do you get it in to that space and more importantly how do you get in out. Is there some sort of block etc to secure in place?

I am 6ft and am likely to be sailing single handed for about 50% of the time. I am trying to get an idea of how I could lift an engine in and out of the well without breaking fingers, braining myself on the boom, dropping the engine, damaging the cockpit and generally running the risk of being committed due to swearing madly while on the water alone.

Thanks
Pat
2:51AM, 15 February 2011 PDT (permalink)

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Andrew Curry says:

The easy way is to heave to lash the tiller out of the way and lift the engine out. Putting it in the cabin is hard work and it is easy to damage the boat. I don’t bother lifting engine out unless racing its not worth the hassle and back ache.
102 months ago (permalink)

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blueachilles says:

Blue is on a swinging mooring and one of the first jobs before setting off for a sail is to put the engine in. It lives in the space under the cockpit when we are not on the boat - nice and secure.

We have a 4hp Mercury 4 st which has plenty of oomph for an Achilles. Its easy enough and light enough to lift in and out; simply takes a bit of care to avoid knocking anything, through the companion way and down into the well.

There is often some swearing, but I have not broken any fingers or dropped the engine. I generally brain myself on the boom at least once per trip anyway!

its a lot easier than you think.

The inboard/outboard is an excellent arrangement; the prop is in the right place in front of the rudder, and if you get a rope round the prop you can easily sort it. Unlike inboard engines, you can take it home for the winter, replace it easily, etc.

Like Andrew, we keep the engine in the well while sailing. Apart from anything else, Di feels more competent that she could control the boat if I fell overboard/ had a heart attack/ seriously brained myself on the boom.

The "Secret Weapon" helps to reduce turbulence in the well - see our photostream for details, several of us have something similar.

We did leave the engine in for one season, but had to scrub it a couple of times to get weed off, and we got barnacles in the water inlet so its not ideal.

If you are going to race, you may want to put the engine away having motored away from your mooring. Options include motoring off the mooring, then stopping while you sort it out; takes only a few minutes, or as Andrew has said, if the sails are already up, heaving to. The Achilles heaves to beautifully.
102 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

I m nearly 6 ft,,, 66yrs had a quadruple bypass . etc
I complain on here about the engine but really its not too bad..
Chille and Goskar are low bridge deck (as are Rod and Andrews )makeing it easier than the later ones .. Mine is a Tohatsu 8hp 2 st,,
Chilles is a 4hp merc 4 st both 27kg ,,, The anti cavitition plate on mine has to be turned to get down pass the flange in the bottom of the tube
I may even grind it off..
I nearly always leave the motor down below and sail on and off the mooring,, I find the motor in slows the boat and makes it less responsive,, Like Rod says its in the right place (in front of the rudder
and grips the water at all times) Bonus is is you take it home in the winter,And dont forget you can heave up the boom on the toppig lift..
Originally posted 102 months ago. (permalink)
busy home edited this topic 102 months ago.

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064Fleur says:

Another view - I get all the sails up and let the sheets go (not while running). The boat stops and the rudder stops working. Shove the tiller out of the way (either way, doesn't matter), yank the engine out, hold it upright for at least a minute to drain and then lower it onto the cabin floor. If out for a long while, it is easy then to shove it aft under the bridgedeck.

It takes about three minutes, doesn't hurt my back and is a small price to pay for having the engine in the right place when you are using it. Some people have put them on the transom, but there are control problems and it comes out of the water in a swell.

With it out, and the plug in, you have, essentially, a big, beautiful dinghy that does precisely what you want and will sail into the tightest places. I don't like to leave it in because it gets in the way, slows the boat and tends to chuck water on the cockpit floor.
Originally posted 102 months ago. (permalink)
064Fleur edited this topic 102 months ago.

busy home [deleted] says:

Well put!
102 months ago (permalink)

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Scott and Portia1386 says:

I agree with the other s Portia has an 8 HP Yam which weighs about 28 Kgs and while it can be a hassle to put in and out it’s manageable. As well as the other’s comments it’s in the open so doesn’t get choked like some that are in the lazarette. And if any thing goes wrong it’s easy to get at. We tend to sail off the mooring with the blanking plate in when racing and use the seagull to get us home at the end of the night. If cruising I leave the yam in we are going to adopt Blues idea for this year
102 months ago (permalink)

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rothwell_neil says:

I leave the Honda in most of the year pulling it out to clean a few times per year. With an insert in the hole to block off most of the area it is quieter and much faster, makes such a difference that I would only think of taking the engine out if racing. The Honda is also fairly low cross section and less drag than the old 8Hp Mariner that was in when I got her.
102 months ago (permalink)

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Amrum 9171Y says:

I have a Honda 5hp 4st which I use when cruising single handed for any distance, and I leave it in the well. It does slow the boat a bit when sailing, and there's the noise from the water slopping in the well, but it doesn't really get in the way when I'm on my own, and it's there if it's needed.
If I go racing down Channel with a crew I would take it out and put it down below, and it's easy enough - as described above - if more than one is person on board. It weighs about 25kgs.
For racing round the cans and local cruising I bought a second hand Tohatsu 3.5hp 2st. It weighs 13kgs, has plenty of grunt, and I can lift it out and put it down below on my own without much effort. i wouldn't bother if out for a 2 hour sail, but i would if racing. Great little motor - I've currently lent it to a friend for the Frostbite series. He's using it on the back of a Sun 2500 in place of a 10hp honda, and he says it does the job well. The Tohatsu only has forward and neutral, so to reverse has to be rotated in the well - easy as long as there's room in the hole in the plug.
Regarding leaving the outboard on the cabin floor, I did with the Honda for one long distance race last year, and it wedged in well - I had forgotten to take the Tohatsu off, and it was under the cockpit! I had 4 crew, and it was windy, so having the weight forward a bit was fine, and probably helped trim a bit, but having 2 crew on deck to windward probably helped more!
102 months ago (permalink)

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rothwell_neil says:

Make a fairing plate as it makes half a knot difference and it is totally quiet with no glugging or water coming in. I don't think I shipped any water thorough the engine well last year with the fairing in. Rod and Andrew agree. I copied the idea from Andrew.

www.flickr.com/photos/8165051@N06/2147233946/
www.flickr.com/photos/14026017@N04/4584286739/
102 months ago (permalink)

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Amrum 9171Y says:

....another job to add to the list! Very neat! Thanks.
102 months ago (permalink)

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rothwell_neil says:

If Ron has finished with the mould and made a few of his own then you are all welcome to use it.
102 months ago (permalink)

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Amrum 9171Y says:

That would be great, thanks. Ron - have you finished with it?
If so, perhaps Blue could bring it up sometime on his way back from Falmouth to Glos - you pass close by Thornbury on the way!
102 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

Flicker mail.
102 months ago (permalink)

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blueachilles says:

Glad to assist with delivery, give me a call/flickrmail.
102 months ago (permalink)

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