Discussions (1290)

Condensation

view profile

Skykomish E29 says:

Hi guys, just been back to check on the boat to find the walls and ceiling dripping (Cascading would be a better description) with condensation, despite having three "chemical dehumidifiers" vented washboards and two roof vents, short of sticking up new headlining, which is a dark art practiced by a few members cleverer than me, any suggestions?
I have just purchased 2.5 litres of "anti condensation" paint which apparently contains plastic micro beads that help to insulate the walls, so will be giving that a go in the spring.
I recognise that the main problem is a result of not having anything on the GRP interior to insulate, but I am loathe to line her with carpet, though this has been stuck on the forecabin sides by the previous owner it doesn't really look that great.
I did think about panelling the interior, but it would reduce the headroom and would take a master craftsman to get it looking right (mmmmm shame my boat isn't in Cornwall, I might just know somebody).
Originally posted at 3:43AM, 5 January 2010 PDT (permalink)
Skykomish E29 edited this topic 116 months ago.

view photostream

rothwell_neil says:

I have a 60W tube greenhouse heater that I have used in the past to keep this nice and dry. Not bad as I use it on a timer and got a full winter out of £10. Must be nice to be able to consider putting an insulating liner in, I am looking to gain headroom not lose it!
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

blueachilles says:

Blue had shocking condensation the winter before last, to the extent we were sure we had severe leaks through for example the shroud u bolts. Turned out that the bolts were where a lot of the condensation collected, because they were (even) colder than the rest.

However, once the weather warmed up the condensation disappeared, and there were no ill effects.

If you have plenty of ventilation, and the interior is wipe clean GRP, and if you have taken out anything likely to be damaged by damp (curtains, cushions, charts, electronics etc) I would say you have done all you should.
116 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

Goskars condensation is much worse under the now clear fore hatch.
I have a solar vent and very large holes in her winter washboards.
.She is still VERY wet, The bilge is 6ins deep in 2 weeks!
I even left the gas cooker on slow last week (1 canister type)
I have a full size PVC cover being made this week (yes red yes £ 350)
Luckily the main wood work is not absorbing damp ,,Cellulose sanding sealer and deks oil no 1, 2 coats ..
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

NormanKlipspringer is a group administrator NormanKlipspringer says:

I too have a 60W geenhouse heater on a timer which keeps the boat dry. I thought that burning gas produces moisture? I f you don't have access to mains power then I have no suggestions.
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

rothwell_neil says:

Burning gas produces lots of water, I used the stove to warm the boat one day last winter when I was working inside and it produced lots of water and condensation.
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Skykomish E29 says:

Thanks guys glad I am not the only sufferer I used to use a tube heater on Aeolus which worked well, unfortunately I don't have electricity at the moment, partly because all of the sockets are being used on the pontoon and I have no convenient hole for the cable to enter the boat, though this could be remedied fairly easily as one of the locker covers needs some work so I could run a cable through this.

Yes Burniing gas is bad news as Neil says it pumps water into the atmosphere, I remember how suprised I was during a Physics lesson at School when I was told that a gallon of Paraffin in a heater produces nearly a gallon of water!!!!!!! plus carbon monoxide no wonder I was so dopey as a child, we only heated our house with paraffin and a coal fire!

I shall see how the Condensation paint goes as this will at least make the interior look a little less spartan hopefully going someway to filling the glass strands of the grp interior, failing that i shall just have to get Linda to weave her magic and at least line the sides with vinyl. Getting the tidy edge is the challenge.

Ron you have also answered another question for me as I was wondering where all the water was coming from in the bilge, as I have to pump her out once a month, I am sure a fair bit comes from the engine hatch in the cockpit as this is cracked in places, but I had not thought of condensation. I have the engine wrapped in a nice thick blanket at the moment.
.
116 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

Gaffer tape!! seals up my windows, fore hatch, locker tops etc, white spirit cleans up sticky bits in the spring,,, Pity Ian left Rustler I could run a cable down from the yard boats!!
I did not think about water from gas.. I too was brought up in a coal warmed house....
Hey we ve not had any snow down here ,, Yet ,,,,,a bit cold though,,
Whats wrong with carpet ? Renew each year its cheap and once done you have the pattern,,?
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

rothwell_neil says:

The hull of Emily has been insulated with 12" square cork tiles stuck with evostick. Look old and pre-date previous owner, still stuck and must say I like them as they are warm to lie against and don't suffer condensation or get wet
116 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

New cover delivered today (ordered monday)
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Skykomish E29 says:

Linda is stranded in the snow, so far has taken her 4 hours to travel 7 miles still has another 35 miles to go... bless her cotton socks. Hate to think what the boat is like inside in this weather, got to get up there at some stage to pay this quarter's mooring fees.
Originally posted 116 months ago. (permalink)
Skykomish E29 edited this topic 116 months ago.

view photostream

pjbharrison says:

You're obviously very concerned about Linda, Malcolm!
You hear of her plight and announce it on the web in the same blog as expressing your concerns about damp in your boat and paying it's mooring fees. I hope she doesn't read the site.
Perhaps you should edit your entry :)
Cheers
Paul
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Skykomish E29 says:

Yes does sound bad but she was on the phone to me as I was typing the entry so I mentioned her stranding at the same time.....
116 months ago (permalink)

busy home [deleted] says:

She dosent deserve you!
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Skykomish E29 says:

The poor little thing took 7 hours to get home in the end. She was stuck in th Medway towns for most of it, the roads were just sheet ice and traffic sliding everywhere. She helped push a guy who had a very pregnant wife with him, whilst other males just sat in their cars and watched....... !!!!!
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Super Snoopy 050 says:

How's the condensation now? Should be in large icicles that you can conveniently snap off and throw overboard.
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Red Marlin says:

I have lived aboard for a total of 13 winters so condensation has been a big issue. It seems to me that heat and insulation are not the real cures. The problem is that the air is carrying a lot of moisture and we have to get rid of the dew in the atmosphere. Living on board makes the matter worse as we breath, boil kettles etc and having a fan heater just warms up damp air and it needs to condense on the coldest spot it finds (yes forehatch and through deck fittings provide this). Chemical de-humidifiers work but are not powerful enough. Mains powered de-humidifiers provide a ice cold plate to attract the damp air to condense. On liveaboard boats a good solution is to have a cockpit tent and leave the washboards out as the warm air rises and then condenses on the plastic windows. Malo and halbergs are even better as they have glass screens which provide a cold surface. I have often thought that making up washboards from aluminium would provide a cold place for the condensation to go. Damp winter air on a boat needs to be dried out - insulate the coldest place on a boat where you get condensation and it merely moves it on to the next coldest place it can find. A friend had an unsinkable Etap 26 which is the best insulated boat I have seen - the fresh water tank with its pipe going to the deck was the coldest place so he had a puddle under the tank
116 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

Skykomish E29 says:

Thanks for that red Marlin very interesting piece. If we were on the boat for long periods I would consider a dehumidifier (electric) but wouldn't like to leave one on for long periods unattended.
116 months ago (permalink)

Would you like to comment?

Sign up for a free account, or sign in (if you're already a member).