Discussions (149)

Close Up Panoramas

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

Has anyone ever made a successful panorama from macro shots?
Is there a way to achieve good results from it?

The closest I've been able to get is to stand away from the subject and zoom in.

The problem is, of course, that the closer you are, the more shift there is in the apparent position of things, so stitching is much harder to do.
I have tried to manually align shots before I take them, and it worked to a degree, but my skill in aligning each shot wasn't perfect, so there was still some error.

Anyway... any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.
4:22AM, 13 December 2006 PDT (permalink)

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dwight92397 says:

This is probably more money than people would spend unless you want to specialize in macro-

Dentists use cameras that fit inside of your mouth. The lens is at the end if a stick that lets him get the view he wants. Price ranges from $1000 to $12,000+. My $3000 camera is fine for dental photos. I haven't tried anything else with it yet. It would be fun to try a 360 pano in someone's mouth, but alignment would be difficult.
ages ago (permalink)

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whiteoakart says:

I am going to try that Falcifer.
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

Thanks Dwight. But yes, that is more money than I would like to spend. My camera isn't even worth $300... maybe half that... which is why I need help. ;-)

And I've seen a few pictures that were seemingly taken from inside someone's mouth, and they're kind of creepy...

Which part are you going to try, WhiteOakArt?

Edit: I just found this.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
Ben (Falcifer) edited this topic ages ago.

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whiteoakart says:

I have been playing with extreme macro images lately. And at the same time panoramas with Calico/Autostitch.

I like the challenge of combining them. I will be sure to let you know how it comes out.

I use a Canon s50 and a home-made lens assembly for the macros.
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

Sounds like a huge challenge really. I'd love to see what you come up with from that.
ages ago (permalink)

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_sarchi says:

..I gave a pro account on this theme but I've been pondering another_
ages ago (permalink)

proud education [deleted] says:

Have you thought about trying to setup some sort of dolly to move the camera in the horizontal plane. What springs to mind is setting the camera on a beanbag on a skateboard. That way you keep the camera and image in the same plane for all the shots. I've seen some good examples of grafitti covered walls done that way. I appreciate that example is not macro but I think you could scale it down (lego?)
ages ago (permalink)

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whiteoakart says:

As Falcifer wrote, the problem is that macro photos have such limited depth of field (maybe a couple mm) that it is very difficult for the software to find matches to align. If you try to move the camera linear-ly, the POV changes and it really screws things up: lots of ghosting, etc..

I am going to try shooting a LOT of shots, very close together, while panning, maybe a degree at a time. I may need to open the individual shots in Photoshop and crop out some of the really out of focus Bokeh stuff, then try Autostitch.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
whiteoakart edited this topic ages ago.

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whiteoakart says:

Andy, I just noticed a edit in Falcifer's post above. he has a link where someone is in the process of doing something similar to what you propose.
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

WhiteOakArt: I did try using a stack of dice, then using my tripod simply raise the camera up.
I figured the same way; shooting lots of shots at smaller angles, would work. I did have to crop out the edges to get a "decent" shot, but the perspective is completely off.
Admittedly, I did get all of the dice in one shot I took, so it's not a great example, but it does go to show how badly the perspective shift between shots. I had better luck lining the shots up in Photoshop, just had problems with the background being different shades, which wouldn't be too hard to correct, I think.

I'll upload a picture of the result of the dice stack soon.
ages ago (permalink)

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Michael Willinger says:

bogen sells an attachment that allows the camera to shift from the same tripod position. i've just started using a 6x12 camera & already i want something like a 4x10 next. in the past i made a track system for a tripod dolly.
ages ago (permalink)

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imageo says:

This is a very interesting question, How to get a autostich to work on close up images.

Its harder than you think. I figure it is mainly because of parrallax issues that shift the relative position of foreground and background objects making matching very difficult.

gwandanaland collage

So my first attempt to find a reasonable solution was to zoom in but take lots of images (and I mean lots) then assemble these.

saving gwondanaland

Even though this is not a true macro subject it is a confined space and I wanted to be able to show all of it at once. The large number of`images meant I did at least get a match across everything, however it is easy to see where some stright lines are jagged and some images still don't match fully. Yet I was happy that I did get a result.
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
imageo edited this topic ages ago.

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imageo says:

When I realised it was mainly the background that was stopping the stitch process when I got close up. I figured I should use depth of field to throw the backgrpound out of focus. With a normal lens and close up the depth of field can do this but I decided to try out my telephoto zoom lens "super macro feature". It gives a tighter depth of depth and you get fantastic control over what is put out of focus. The only problem is you can't get closer than about a meter. (around 3 feet) not exactly macro close.

My DL super macro telephoto zoom lens
I have a 40cm tall wollemi pine and wanted to take its portrait, so this seem an perfect subject. I stepped back zoomed in and took 7 seperate "macro" photos.

collage of photos for my photomacro autostitch

Finally I used autostitch to assemble them and it worked wonderfully.

Wollemi Pine [Wollemia nobilius] as an example of a macro autostitch

Well I think it worked well
Originally posted ages ago. (permalink)
imageo edited this topic ages ago.

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

@imageo: That does work well. I especially like the portrait of the tree.
I never thought about throwing the background completely out of focus.

The problem I have with that is that if I zoom in, then I have to move much further back to get the subject in focus, and while it may produce a decent "panorama", it's not really macro. I can get almost the same result from a regular image... but I think that's mostly due to the limits of my camera.

I did mention an autostitched image of a stack of dice, but I have since lost that, so I can't post it.

I do use a reversed lens in front of my camera, though, to get a super-macro photo, and using that method I took 14 images of a penny and stitched them together.

Autostitched "panorama"

Final version was over 6000px wide.
Obviously the lack of any real depth on the penny helps with the stitching.
ages ago (permalink)

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whiteoakart says:

this is great. Look at the image full size. The detail is amazing.
Falcifer- Did you "pan" the camera, or slide it up and down?
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

@whiteoakart: I had the camera parallel to the table, and moved the coin, so I panned the camera relative to the coin.
And you might notice that the background, which is only 2mm (the thickness of the penny) is out of focus, so there's not much real range of use.

I'll have to use the same method for something more 3D like an action figure or something...
Maybe try something that is more of a "scene" rather than basically scanning the subject.
ages ago (permalink)

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vladdythephotogeek says:

I believe it also helps to have the camera mounted and rotating around the nodal points such that it minimizes the parallax error. There are a number of websites you can go to the help you make a special mount to hold you camera correctly.
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

Good point, Vladdy.

This tutorial is fairly simple, I think.
I haven't ever tried using that, but it would help.

Though, with close-ups, if you're moving up, down or side-to-side, then rotation isn't a problem anyway...
And with the super-macro photos, the extremely shallow depth of field limits rotation... personally, the method I used for the penny only gives a dof of only a few millimetres, and the area of focus is the same distance from the camera, so I can't rotate and focus on a point further away. Hence the need to move parallel to the subject.
ages ago (permalink)

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whiteoakart says:

I hadn't thought of moving the penny. Excellent.
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

Yep. It was easier than trying to set up some sort of frame for panning and scanning the camera on the tripod. And it kept the depth of field in the same plane, which really helped
ages ago (permalink)

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pan_tomi says:

PeterDuke,

I've tryied to stitch with MS Expression Design but I couldn't find the automatic procedure. what's the command used?

tkx
bye
ages ago (permalink)

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Ben (Falcifer) says:

My Mum picked up a new tripod for me today... which has a slit on the mount, so that I can vary the position of the camera, and essentially change the pivot point of the camera. Which is pretty good, because I can now position the camera on the tripod so that it rotates about the "nodal point", which is basically my own panoramic tripod head.
I'm hoping it reduces the amount of parallex error in close-ups, which is what it's supposed to do. I'll have to test it out and see how well Autostitch deals with the images.
ages ago (permalink)

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