Discussions (984)

Rotating Back Very Tight

view profile

SeanEsopenko says:

Is there a way to properly loosen or lubricate the rotating back? It's extremely tough to turn on my RB67 Pro-S.
10:27AM, 14 December 2010 PDT (permalink)

view photostream

B-9 says:

You will have to dismantle the two halves, I had a similiar problem with the one i purchased for my DIY camera project.

I sepereated the 2 halves and cleaned the rails, then relubed with Silicon grease (white grease)

There are a few replies on my post earlier this month,

"RB Adapter Dismantle?"

Once the light seal material degrades, there really is nothing in the way of it getting caught up in the rails and dampening the revolving actions, i had thick layer of goo lining the rails on my back, didnt take but a minute to clean and lube once I had the back dismantled.

If you rotate the back halfway, and look inbetween the two halves you should see 4 "boots" it should be obvious when you look that they hold the two rails together, a few screws and the back will seperate.
A little more tricky getting it back together, but still an easy enough project. I would reccomend replacing the light seals wile your at it.

1MM seal foam works great, but you can order kits from Mamiya or Camerasealkits ebay store. The later of the two is run by a guy named Kevin, and he offers a great product at a very reasonable price, he will even make a custom kit if you only need one or two certain seals. I buy all my kits from Kevin and have never been dissapointed, he has to be one of the fastest shippers on ebay.
118 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

SeanEsopenko says:

Sweet! Thanks for the info, I'll look at it tonight.

Do I have to replace the light seal while I'm at it? I mean, do the light seals fall off or something when it's opened? It's not leaking light at the moment, just tough to turn.
118 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

B-9 says:

If they are intact and not starting to fall away or degrade than you should be fine, Just an idea if your gonna put the time into it.

Goodluck!
118 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

OldUncleMe says:

When you service stuff, you often gain access by disassembly to perishable parts, such as the light seals. IME (in my experience) it's almost always a mistake not to replace these parts. Just the act of taking the larger components apart can shift or affect the perishable parts, which may already have neared the end of their service life. And they are usually an inexpensive item, especially compared to the gear they are part of.

For instance, every oil change for your car, go for a new oil filter also, and a new drain seal.

Every brake job, all new hydraulic brake fluid and pads/shoes all around; new disks! new drums! (or get them trued if this is the first brake job and they are in spec.)

If you replace a control board in an appliance with heat, change the seals (where applicable.)

New hose? New hose washer: no leaks.

New lens? New attitude!

/..
118 months ago (permalink)

view photostream

B-9 says:

Very true!

But if the seals are intact, or have recently been serviced no need to go the extra mile.

I suppose ive just made a habbit of it, doing small repairs for extra money, i mostly always replace the seals when restoring a camera for a customer or for resale.
118 months ago (permalink)

Would you like to comment?

Sign up for a free account, or sign in (if you're already a member).