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A Theyyam performer, one who is in full costume and make-up, is God personified. Toddy, the local brew from coconut, is taken in small quantities to aid the transition from human into a Hindu God. The Theyyam performer in this photograph is drinking some toddy from a small silver vessel. Performances last from sunset to sunrise and is a vital part of village religious ritual in Kerala, south India.

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Theyyam, The Divine Faith

  

© 2014 Biju Thomas PhotoWorks. All Rights Reserved.

Theyyam - When Gods from heaven comes down to earth, even the very human turns to be mysteriously divine. A candid moment of the transformation.

The artist has partially completed his make up and is getting ready to wear the rest of the costumes.

Face that speaks of a million.

Facebook.

In India, you can attend to a popular Hindu ritual of worship called Theyyam. It is an ancestral cult for Hindu population, which is divided by castes.

The Theyyam worship is special because it involves all the castes and classes of the Hindu people living in the region. Theyyam is performed by male members of particular castes in most cases, but in the north of Kerala, some women do it to embody particular goddesses or heroins. Men from Malayan, Pulayan, Vannan, Anjoottan, Munnutton, Velan, Chungathan, Koppalan and Mayilon are part of the castes who perform Theyyam.

The performers of Theyyam are all members of the indigenous tribal community, and they have an important position in Theyyam. This is unique, since only in Kerala, do both the upper-caste Brahmins and lower-caste tribals share an important position in a major form of worship.

The term Theyyam is a corrupt form of Devam or God. People of the districts in which Theyyam happens consider the performers of the Theyyam itself as a deities and look forward to getting blessed from the Theyyam.

To get the appearance of super-human, original and colourful costume and make-up are used in Theyyam dances. An essential component of the costume of the Theyyam performer are the leaves of coconut tree, cut and made into different shapes and sizes. All the dancers wear a very special massive headgear with a structure that is usually prepared from arecanut tree and bamboo as it is for the « uduthukettu », the waist-dress. It takes hours to make up and prepare the dancers. It is part of the performer's specific skills to be able to craft the pieces of clothing, put the make-up on to another dancer, dance, sing, and know the stories of all the gods.

People from the village attend the metamorphosis. So the performer gets gradually dressed through the whole ceremony and is only fully dressed up at the peak of the ceremony. The face is decorated with red and yellow make up in intricate patterns. To make the costumes more attractive, red colored flowers are also sticked to the fancy dresses. The performance happens in front of the village and all the people can attend it. The devotees stand up or can be sitting on a sacred tree or stool in front of the shrine where the deity they are embodying are supposed to live.

Theyyam tells the story of people who lost their lives in battlefield, pangs of women who committed suicide or persons killed by the local chieftains. Such heroes or gods are honoured through theyyams, the ceremonies performed in front of shrines.

 

The dancer along with the drummers recites the particular ritual song, which describes the myths and legends of the deity of the shrine or the folk deity to be propitiated. The dancer comes in front of the shrine and gradually “metamorphoses” into the particular deity of the shrine.

There are about 450 known forms of « theyyams » and each has got its own myth and style of costumes, make-up, choreography and songs. After the dance, people also consult the performers because they can see the future. There is a charge for the consultation.

 

© Eric Lafforgue

www.ericlafforgue.com

Theyyam (Teyyam, Theyyattam or Thira) is a popular ritual form of worship of North Malabar in Kerala, India, predominant in the Kolathunadu area (consisting of present-day Kasargod, Kannur Districts, Mananthavady Taluk of Wayanad and Vadakara and Koyilandy Taluks of Kozhikode of Kerala) and also in Kodagu and Tulu nadu of Karnataka as a living cult with several thousand-year-old traditions, rituals and customs. The performers of Theyyam belong to the lower caste community, and have an important position in Theyyam. They are also known as 'malayanmar'.People of these districts consider Theyyam itself as a God and they seek blessings from this Theyyam. A similar custom is followed in the Tulu Nadu region of neighbouring Karnataka known as Bhuta Kola.

God's Own Face Makeup...

'takes lot of time to do this'

"Vishnu Moorthi Theyyam"

Theyyam or Theyyattam is a popular Hindu ritual form of worship of North Malabar in Kerala state ( Kasargod, Kannur, Mananthavady Taluk of Wayanad and Vadakara & Koyilandy Taluks of Kozhikode ).The term Theyyam is a corrupt form of Devam or God. People consider Theyyam itself as a God and they seek blessings from this Theyyam

Vishnumoorthi Theyyam!

People consider Theyyam itself as a God and they seek blessings from Theyyam

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theyyam

www.theyyamcalendar.com/

Its one of the most Spiritual & Thrilling experiencing in my life as i was able to click few snaps of ancient form of Rituals in Coorg which is called TERE, and also it is called THEYYAM in North Malabar coast of Kerala which is also known as Tulu Naadu, and its prevalent among the Tulu-speaking community in Udupi, Dakshina Kannada districts in Karnataka, It is to be believed that God spirit will come on their body & people take their blessings.

Most of these Goddesses are known as BHAGAVATHY (the Mother-Goddess that is the Divine and United form of the three principal Goddesses namely, Brahmani (Saraswati), Vaishnavi (Lakshmi), and Shivani (Durga)). There are few other forms like CHOWNDY (Goddess Kali/Durga), Raahu kuliya, Panyuruli, Aiyappa etc.

Its not easy to take their pictures when these people are in spirutual trance representing a perticular god and i was lucky to click most of the pictures within the distance of just one feet. They chase off people who try to click their photographs. And i just cant beleive that i was allowed to click and i just cant forget that this person with God spirit called RAAHU KULIYA allowed me to click pictures and the way he was staring at me..i was numb..unable to take pictures. But it came out quite good and the most happiest moment is touching his feet and he gave his blessings. One of the best moment in my life.

Kandanar Kelan Theyyam

 

“Miracles occur naturally as expressions of love. The real miracle is the love that inspires them. In this sense everything that comes from love is a miracle.”

 

Dedicated to my friends Nikki and Greeshma...

i wish u a Happy married life my friends...

 

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Shot from land of Theyyam - Kannur

 

Exposure: 0.002 sec (1/640)

Aperture: f/5.0

Focal Length: 108 mm

ISO Speed: 200

  

If you are in India by Jan to March, you can attend to a popular Hindu ritual of worship called Theyyam in southern state, known as God's own country Kerala. Theyyam is performed by male members of particular castes only. Particular part of the castes who perform Theyyam dance and they are mainly from Malayan, Munnutton, Pulayan, Velan, Chungathan, Koppalan, Mayilon, Vannan & Anjoottan and few more ....

 

Theyyam is performed particularly in two districts of Kerala, Kannur and Kasargod, area is also known as Malabar.

 

There are about 450 known forms of Theyyams and each has got its own myth and style of costumes, make-up, choreography and songs. After the dance, people consult also the dancers because they communicate forecasts and see the future.

 

:copyright: Manish Lakhani

www.withManish.com

A late dedication to the red call of Burma's Freedom.

 

Posting another shot from the carnival here in Tripunithra, a town close to Cochin in Kerala, India.

 

It is an amazing and overpowering mix of religious themes and symbolism. A part of the Onam Festival in Kerala this grand procession is called "Athachamayam"

 

This powerful shot in red is of a dancer symbolising a male God in the dance form popularly known as "Theyyam". This is a crop to show the face and the elaborate headgear. There appear to be no good shots online of a Theyyam dancer with a full costume on. Nor do I have one from the shoot.

 

Theyyam is a popular ritual dance of north Kerala,………..

………..The dance or invocation is generally performed in front of the village shrines. It is also performed in the houses as ancestor worship with elaborate rites and rituals.

There is no stage or curtain and other arrangements for the performance. The devotees would be standing or some of them would be sitting on a sacred tree in front of the shrine. In brief it is an open theatre………………(((.Excerpted from the /wiki Theyyam )))

  

......A male dancer dons an elaborate mask-like make up. The wearing of spectacular costume further enhances the illusion of becoming a divine being. The unique quality of Theyyam is that its deities can manifest themselves in the bodies of empowered men as dancer-performers, and appear before their devotees while interacting with them by answering questions, mocking the pompous, ridiculing the vain, and humiliating the arrogant. (( Excerpted from theyyam ))

 

Photo edit for cropping suggested by Oracle Lady Thanks.

 

(Workflow DSC_0899 exp +-, Cu, Sh, Le crop )

They yam is an art form practiced only in Kerala and that too in a select part of its Northern Districts of Kannur, Kasragode and Calicut.

 

It is an ancient dance form and a precursor to the more stylised and less vigorous Kathakali. Steeped in ancient history it is a wonderful mix of the ethnographic influences in the state of Kerala. The Theyyam performances are held in clan groups and all the members get their resources together and have it conducted year after year within a dwindling availibilty of money and the exaggerated moral responsibility of keeping the traditions alive for their ancestors and their family names.

 

Ultimately it is an economic issue whether this great dance form will survive or not.. The Theyyam dances are performed by distinct caste and communities and it is they who will over a period of time decide whether they would continue to perform the dances or better opportunities and employment will take them elsewhere. The Theyyam celebrations are expensive affairs and it is a tough job for the vast majority of the clans to keep it going.

 

It is a rare privilege to see this in one's lifetime. A few more years and who knows whether it survives or not.

  

This was shot in 2008 at Kottayampovil which is about 11-12 kms from the town of Thalassery on the NH 17 that runs along the coast. This photograph was lying ready but unublished. So better late then never as this is the season for Thyyam in Kerala.

 

Dance On !!

       

Dates

Taken on January 26, 2008 at 11.56am IST

Posted to Flickr December 14, 2010 at 3.19PM IST

Exif data

Camera Nikon D70

Exposure 0.004 sec (1/250)

Aperture f/5.6

Focal Length 185 mm

ISO Speed 200

Exposure Bias 0 EV

Flash No Flash

 

DSC_0020 from nef 2 exp LATEST sharp red leser br and fce sharp

Theyyam (Teyyam, Theyyattam or Thira) is a popular ritual form of worship of North Malabar in Kerala

Meleri is a ritual performed along with Theyyams in temples of North Kerala. In meleri , the devotees will jump into the heap of live coal as offering to god. This is photographed from Muchilott Kaav, Mavicheri, Payyanur in Kerala.

 

If you are in India by Jan to March, you can attend to a popular Hindu ritual of worship called Theyyam in southern state, known as God's own country Kerala. Theyyam is performed by male members of particular castes only. Particular part of the castes who perform Theyyam dance and they are mainly from Malayan, Munnutton, Pulayan, Velan, Chungathan, Koppalan, Mayilon, Vannan & Anjoottan and few more ....

 

Theyyam is performed particularly in two districts of Kerala, Kannur and Kasargod, area is also known as Malabar.

 

There are about 450 known forms of Theyyams and each has got its own myth and style of costumes, make-up, choreography and songs. After the dance, people consult also the dancers because they communicate forecasts and see the future.

 

:copyright: Manish Lakhani

www.withManish.com

Another theyyam dance portrait from Kerala

 

I will be away for a while

And a giant leap for believers . From a Theyyam performance in Northern Kerala.

A performer enacts the throes of anger in Kerala with his hard eyed steely gaze. Maybe he is angry at the mere human photographer or he is in a frenzy of destroying or creating the universe, I know not. Maybe it is nothing at all ;-? but a primate God !

 

Credits to the makers of various brushes (ink dissolve, grass blade and some others) utilized here in shades of bloody red and yellow and green.

 

You must see it in large size -

 

View Large Size on Black, It gives you all the details

 

Camera: Nikon D70

Exposure: 0.001 sec (1/750)

Aperture: f/3.8

Focal Length: 27 mm

Exposure: -0.55

ISO Speed: 200

Exposure Bias: 0 EV

Flash: Off, Did not fire

DSC_0912 wip 2 exp copy with ink dissolve brush etc ver 2

Valapattanam, Kerala, India. 2013

 

Full story here

 

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A very pagan, very surreal ritual from Kerala - Theyyam..

Angakulangara Bhagavathi Theyyam

 

One of my dream shot , i waited for one hour for getting this light , and after one hour

 

i was blessed..:)

PRESS "L" TO VIEW LARGE!

 

Theyyam is a popular ritual form of worship of North Malabar in Kerala, India, predominant in the Kolathunadu area (consisting of present-day Kasargod, Kannur Districts, Mananthavady Taluk of Wayanad and Vadakara and Koyilandy Taluks of Kozhikode of Kerala) and also in Kodagu and Tulu nadu of Karnataka as a living cult with several thousand-year-old traditions, rituals and customs. The performers of Theyyam belong to the lower caste community, and have an important position in Theyyam. They are also known as 'malayanmar'.People of these districts consider Theyyam itself as a God and they seek blessings from this Theyyam. A similar custom is followed in the Tulu Nadu region of neighbouring Karnataka known as Bhuta Kola.

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