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Identifier: roadtoozinwhichi00baum

Title: The road to Oz; in which is related how Dorothy Gale of Kansas, the Shaggy Man, Button Bright, and Polychrome the Rainbow's daughter met on an enchanted road and followed it all the way to the marvelous land of Oz

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919 Neill, John R. (John Rea), ill

Subjects: Fairy tales

Publisher: Chicago : Reilly & Lee

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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endand hugged and kissed her rapturously, and Toto barked joy-fully and Button-Bright smiled a happy smile and consentedto sit on the soft cushions close beside the Princess. Why did nt you send me word you were going to have abirthday party? asked the little Kansas girl, when the firstgreetings were over. Did nt I? asked Ozma, her pretty eyes dancing withmerriment. Did you? replied Dorothy, trying to think. Who do you imagine, dear, mixed up those roads, so asto start you wandering in the direction of Oz? inquired thePrincess. Oh! I never spected you of that, cried Dorothy. I Jve watched you in my Magic Picture all the wayhere, declared Ozma, and twice I thought I should have touse the Magic Belt to save you and transport you to theEmerald City. Once was when the Scoodlers caught you,and again when you reached the Deadly Desert. But theshaggy man was able to help you out both times, so I did notinterfere. Do you know who Button-Bright is? asked Dorothy. 204 tc tc\ Princess Ozma of Oz

 

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No; I never saw him until you found him in the road,and then only in my Magic Picture. And did you send Polly to US? No, dear; the Rainbows Daughter slid from her fatherspretty arch just in time to meet you. Well, said Dorothy, I ve promised King Dox of Fox-ville and King Kik-abray of Dunkiton that I d ask you toinvite them to your party. I have already done that, returned Ozma, because Ithought it would please you to favor them. Did you vite the Musicker? asked Button-Bright. No; because he would be too noisy, and might interferewith the comfort of others- When music is not very good, and 205 The Road to Oz is indulged in all the time, it is better that the performershould be alone, said the Princess. I like the Musickers music, declared the boy, gravely. But I dont, said Dorothy. Well, there will be plenty of music at my celebration,promised Ozma; so I ve an idea Button-Bright wont missthe Musicker at all. Just then Polychrome danced in, and Ozma rose to greetthe Rainbows Daughter i

  

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Stradbally Steam Rally 2013.

 

Preserved 1911 J & H McLaren Traction Engine "The Emerald" (Works No. 1244) in Stradbally, Laois 4th August 2013.

Photographed near Corfu, Greece in June 2006.

 

I have a casual interest in old cruise ships. This is The Emerald, built in 1958 in Newport News, Virginia, USA.

 

She has sailed under other names: the Regent Rainbow, Diamond Island, and the Santa Rosa. She is one of the few recent passenger liners which was built in the United States. She was taken out of operation in 2009.

 

She is owned by Louis Cruise Line and was operated most recently by Thomson.

It was pretty quiet at The Emerald yesterday, unlike years past.

Identifier: birdsnature9101unse

Title: Birds and nature

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors:

Subjects: Birds Natural history

Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : A.W. Mumford, Publisher

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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acture, i. e. itexhibits little rounded concavities andconvexities resembling a shell in shape. The mineral is quite brittle. Someemeralds even have the annoying habit ofbreaking of their own accord soon afterremoval from/ the mine. This can beprevented by warming them graduallybefore exposing them to the heat of thesun or other sudden heat. Beryl and its varieties, like tourmaline,are dichroic, i. e. the stones exhibit differ-ent colors when viewed in different direc-tions. This dichroism can sometimes beobserved by the naked eye, but often notwithout the aid of the instrument knownas the dichroscope. When seen it fur-nishes a positive means of distinguishinga true stone from any glass imitations. The varieties of Beryl have none ofthe brilliancy of the diamond and there-fore depend wholly on their body colorsand their lustre for their beauty and at-tractiveness. Fortunately they exhibitthese qualities as well by artificial light asby daylight. Ordinary Beryl is a mineral of com- 1::

 

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LIBRARY ^VERSIFY (tf ILUNOIS paratively common occurrence, beingoften found in granitic and metamorphicrocks. That of common occurrence is usuallytoo clouded and fractured to be of usefor gem cutting. There are many local-ities, however, where Beryls of gemquality occur. The finest emeralds in the world comefrom Muso, a locality in the UnitedStates of Colombia, seventy-five miles N.N. W. of Bogota. It is a wild and in-accessible region and the mining of thegems is a precarious occupation. Theemeralds occur according to Bauer in adark, bituminous limestone which isshown by fossils to be of Cretaceous age.As emeralds in other localities occur onlyin eruptive or metamorphic rocks, itseems probable that the Muso emeraldshave washed in from an older formation.The emerald bearing beds are horizontal,overlying red sandstone and clay slate.Calcite, quartz, pyrite and the rare min-eral parisite are other minerals found as-sociated with the emerald. The mannerof working these emerald mines is t

  

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Identifier: locomotiveengine11hill

Title: Locomotive engineering : a practical journal of railway motive power and rolling stock

Year: 1892 (1890s)

Authors: Hill, John A. (John Alexander), 1858-1916 Sinclair, Angus, 1841-1919

Subjects: Railroads Locomotives

Publisher: New York : A. Sinclair, J.A. Hill [etc.]

Contributing Library: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

  

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AX OLD WINANS ENGINE. vice at the Sormovo Locomotive Worksin Nijni Novgorod, Russia, and is said tobe in good condition. The photographwas sent us by Mr. Henry Stevens, em-ployed by the Sormovo Company. i i i Disabling Locomotives. The engineer has already shown him-self in evidence in the Cuban difficulty.At Baiquiri, the landing place of General

 

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NKw zi.:,\i,.\\D i.jCjm jtive .\ndcre\v. and Guard T. Jones, are natives of theEmerald Isle, and a more reliable crewcould not be put in charge of a train. Manitoba is to have 500 miles of newroad within two years, if possible. It is alink in the long-contemplated HudsonBay Railroad, which will probably becompleted before many years. Shatters army, was a little railroad whichran to an iron mine nearer Santiago. TheSpanish, on deciding to visit friends fur-ther inland, tried to demolish a locomo-tive, but only succeeded in removing afew parts, such as side rods, etc., whichwere readily replaced. Then the engi-neers were ready to haul supplies. This,brings to mind an incident of theCivil War. which shows that whoever did valve seats and partitions gone doesnt dovery much work. When it comes tosmashing things, the man who knowshow they work gets in his fine strokes. Fads and Fancies in LocomotiveBuilding-No. 8. This particular Strong engine—forseveral were built—was made by the Le-hi

  

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Identifier: scienceguide7692amer

Title: Guide leaflet

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: American Museum of Natural History

Subjects: American Museum of Natural History Natural history

Publisher: New York : The Museum

Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library

Digitizing Sponsor: IMLS / LSTA / METRO

  

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TOUCHING UP THE MEXDED BRANCHES Doctor Childs is skilfully repairing an elkhorn coral specimen that was broken in transit Foirrv TOSS or coual 11 (1 rift i 1112; by. In \\\vtore*2;n)uii(l is a va\overgrown witli sluiih-b(My and pliimod withwind-blown coconut s.In the distance is thelon^ij, low^-lyini;- shoreof Andros. AVe walk around tlieliallery and approachthe arch from the right.The half-domed cyclo-rama, the masterpieceof F. L. Jaques, depict-ing the scene, disclosesa new vista with everystep. Now, we are look-ing out across the coralbarrier marked by longlines of gleaming white breakers at thedark-blue, deep waters of the Tongue ofthe Ocean. As we come nearer, theemerald green shallows just within thereef meet our view, intersected withlong, arching lines of rippling w^avelets

 

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I'm so excited...I just recieved this old photo from my friend Bob. This is a photo taken in 1964 of our Rock and Roll band...the Emeralds. Until now, I didn't even have a photo of all of us together. Our drummer's mother made the green sweater vests. We did not get rich or famous but we sure had fun and all was right in our world when we got together and made some noise.

Identifier: marvelouslandofo00baum

Title: The marvelous land of Oz; being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tin Woodman ... a sequel to the Wizard of Oz

Year: 1904 (1900s)

Authors: Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919 Neill, John R. (John Rea), ill

Subjects: Fantasy

Publisher: Chicago : The Reilly & Britton co.

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Dont you think it will be safer for me to deliveryou into her hands? asked Jinjur, nervously. If you do, it will cost you the throne of theEmerald City! answered the witch, positively. But,if you will let me have my own way, I can save usboth very easily. Then do as you please, replied Jinjur, for itis so aristocratic to be a Queen that I do not wishto be obliged to return home again, to make bedsand wash dishes for my mother. So Mombi called Jellia Jamb to her, and performeda certain magical rite with which she was familiar.As a result of the enchantment Jellia took on theform and features of Mombi, while the old witchgrew to resemble the girl so closely that it seemedimpossible anyone could guess the deception. 251 The Tin Woodman Plucks a Rose Now, said old Mombi to the Queen, let yoursoldiers deliver up this girl to Glinda. She will thinkshe has the real Mombi in her power, and so willreturn immediately to her own country in the South. Therefore Jellia, hobbling along like an aged

 

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woman, was led from the city gates and taken beforeGlinda. Here is the person you demanded, said one ofthe guards, and our Queen now begs you will goaway, as you promised, and leave us in peace. That I will surely do, replied Glinda, muchpleased; if this is really the person she seems to be. It is certainly old Mombi, said the guard, whobelieved she was speaking the truth; and then Jinjurssoldiers returned within the citys gates. 252 The Tin Woodman Plucks a Rose The Sorceress quickly summoned the Scarecrowand his friends to her tent, and began to question thesupposed Mombi about the lost girl Ozma. ButJellia knew nothing at all of this affair, and presentlyshe grew so nervous under the questioning that shegave way and began to weep, to Glindas great as-tonishment. Here is some foolish trickery! said the Sorceress,her eyes flashing with anger. This is not Mombiat all, but some other person who has been made toresemble her! Tell me, she demanded, turning tothe trembling girl, what is y

  

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Identifier: roadtoozinwhichi00baum

Title: The road to Oz; in which is related how Dorothy Gale of Kansas, the Shaggy Man, Button Bright, and Polychrome the Rainbow's daughter met on an enchanted road and followed it all the way to the marvelous land of Oz

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919 Neill, John R. (John Rea), ill

Subjects: Fairy tales

Publisher: Chicago : Reilly & Lee

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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When he came up the donkey head had disappeared, andthe shaggy mans own shaggy head was in its place, with thewater dripping in little streams from his shaggy whiskers. Hescrambled ashore and shook himself to get off some of the wet,and then leaned over the pool to look admiringly at his re-flected face. 150 The Truth Pond I may not be strictly beautiful, even now, he said to hiscompanions, who watched him with smiling faces; but I mso much handsomer than any donkey that I feel as proud as Ican be. You Jre all right, Shaggy Man, declared DorothyAnd Button-Bright is all right, too. So let s thank thrTruth Pond for being so nice, and start on our journey to theEmerald City. I hate to leave it, murmured the shaggy man, with asigh. A truth pond would nt be a bad thing to carry aroundwith us. But he put on his coat and started with the othersin search of some one to direct them on their way.

 

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THEY had not walked far across the flower-strewn mead-ows when they came upon a fine road leading toward thenorthwest and winding gracefully among the pretty yellowhills. That way, said Dorothy, must be the direction of theEmerald City. We d better follow the road until we meetsome one or come to a house. The sun soon dried Button-Brights sailor suit and theshaggy mans shaggy clothes, and so pleased were they at re-gaining their own heads that they did not mind at all thebrief discomfort of getting wet. Tik-Tok and Billina It s good to be able to whistle again, remarked theshaggy man, for those donkey lips were so thick I could notwhistle a note with them. He warbled a tune as merrilyas any bird. 0 You 11 look more natural at the birthday celebration,too, said Dorothy, happy in seeing her friends so happy. Polychrome was dancing ahead in her usual sprightlymanner, whirling gaily along the smooth, level road, untilshe passed from sight around the curve of one of the mounds.Suddenly the

  

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Identifier: illustrateddicti00mollrich

Title: An illustrated dictionary of words used in art and archaeology. Explaining terms frequently used in works on architecture, arms, bronzes, Christian art, colour, costume, decoration, devices, emblems, heraldry, lace, personal ornaments, pottery, painting, sculpture, &c, with their derivations

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors: Mollett, John W. (John William)

Subjects: Art Archaeology -- Dictionaries

Publisher: London, Sampson Low, Marston, Searle, and Rivington

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Angels, (Gr. &77eAoy, a messenger) in Chris-tian Art are represented in nine degrees, \vhichare divided into three categories. The first con-sists of Seraphim, Cherubim, and Thrones ; the i6 WORDS USED IN

 

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Fig. ■J4. Arms of France vvilh Angels as supporters. XIV. century. second ot Dominations, Virtues, Powers ; andthe third of Princedoms, Archangels, and Angels.They are represented as young, to show theircontinued strength; winged as messengers ofspeed ; barefooted and girt to show their readi-ness ; in robes of white indicative of purity, orin cloth of gold for their glory ; the cloth of golddiapered with bands of precious stones ; theemerald, emblem of nnfadiiigyouth ; the crystal,oipitrity; the sajjphire, qIcelestialco7itemplation;and the ruby, of divine love. During the re-naissance, Pugin complains, the edifying andtraditional representations of angelic spirits wereabandoned, and, in lieu of the albe of purity andgolden vests of glory, the artists indulged inpretty cupids sporting in clouds, &c. Theproper attributes of the angels are trumpets, forthe voice of God; flaming swords, for the 7i:r«//^of God; sceptres, for i\ie power of God; thuriblesor censers for i\\e prayers o

  

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Identifier: gri_c00033125000912127

Title: A practical handbook of dyeing and calico-printing. With eleven page-plates, forty-seven specimens of dyed and printed fabrics, and thirty-eight woodcuts

Year: 1874 (1870s)

Authors: Crookes, William, 1832-1919

Subjects: Dyes and dyeing Calico-printing

Publisher: London, Longmans, Green

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute

  

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Chrome- or Canary-Yellow. are added 2 lbs. of acetate of lead, the mixture being stirred until solution iscomplete. The deposit is allowed to subside, and the clear liquor, whichshould stand at 270 Tw., strained off. This standard liquor is, in the shadegiven in the specimen, mixed in the proportion of 1 measure (at 27° Tw.), to3 measures of a solution of gum substitute at 5 lbs. to a gallon. The mixtureis printed on the cloth, which is dried, and the colour is raised (or developed)by passing the fabric through a cold solution of soda-ash at 12° Tw. for twominutes, when it is rinsed in water, washed, dried, and passed through a weaksolution of chloride of lime by the mangle, and again dried. This colour is also known under the term of rust yellow. A darker shadeof rust-yellow generally used for warps for goods which are to be colouredPrussian blue, may be coloured in the yarn by the following method :—25 lbs. of clean cotton yarn are run through a bath of 3 lbs. of copperas

 

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Iron-Bufp. 156 DYEING AND CALICO PRINTING. and 2 lbs. of nitrate of iron for about five turns, and are wrung out. Theyarn is next taken through a strained cold bath of 4 lbs. of lime for fiveturns, and the colour is submitted to oxidation in the air. When even, theyarn is again dipped in the iron bath and again in the lime, and oxidiseduntil the desired shade is obtained. The colour is fast. Gold leaf, pure or alloyed, or imitation, is applied to woven tissue by meansof albumen or a fatty and resinous mordant. GREEN MINERAL PIGMENTS. Mineral greens may be divided into two groups. To the first belong thosemineral compounds possessing a green colour and well-defined chemicalconstitution, as chrome-green or hydrated oxide of chromium ; Scheeles greenor arsenite of copper; Schweinfiirt green or aceto-arsenite of copper; and theemerald greens. The second group includes all those various shades of greenwhich are composed of mixtures of blue and yellow pigments, and constitutesimply mechanic

  

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Palantine: sight and concrete hills CD- from local band we saw at the Emerald- April 18, 2008.

Identifier: marvelouslandofo00baum

Title: The marvelous land of Oz; being an account of the further adventures of the Scarecrow and Tin Woodman ... a sequel to the Wizard of Oz

Year: 1904 (1900s)

Authors: Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919 Neill, John R. (John Rea), ill

Subjects: Fantasy

Publisher: Chicago : The Reilly & Britton co.

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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ross, in spite of the ferry-man, and can continue our journey. I didnt mind swimming, at all, remarked thehorse. Nor did I, added Jack. They soon regained the road of yellow brick,which proved to be a continuation of the road theyhad left on the other side, and then Tip once moremounted the Pumpkinhead upon the back of theSaw-Horse. 62 Jack Pu m p k i n h ea ds Ride If you ride fast, said he, the wind will helpto dry your clothing. I will hold on to the horsestail and run after you. In this way we all will be-come dry in a very short time. Then the horse must step lively, said Jack. Ill do my best, returned the Saw-Horse,cheerfully. Tip grasped the end of the branch that served astail to the Saw-Horse, and called loudly: Get-up! The horse started at a good pace, and Tip fol-lowed behind. Then he decided they could gofaster, so he shouted: Trot! Now, the Saw-Horse remembered that this wordwas the command to go as fast as he could; so hebegan rocking along the road at a tremendous pace,

 

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63 Jack Pu m pk i nhea ds Ride and Tip had hard work — running faster than heever had before in his life — to keep his feet. Soon he was out of breath, and although hewanted to call Whoa! to the horse, he found hecould not get the word out of his throat. Thenthe end of the tail he was clutching, being nothingmore than a dead branch, suddenly broke away, andthe next minute the boy was rolling in the dust of theroad, while the horse and its pumpkin-headed riderdashed on and quickly disappeared in the distance. By the time Tip had picked himself up andcleared the dust from his throat so he could sayWhoa! there was no further need of saying it, forthe horse was long since out of sight. So he did the only sensible thing he could do.He sat down and took a good rest, and afterwardbegan walking along the road. Some time I will surely overtake them, he re-flected; for the road will end at the gates of theEmerald City, and they can go no further than that. Meantime Jack was holding fast to

  

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Identifier: roadtoozinwhichi00baum

Title: The road to Oz; in which is related how Dorothy Gale of Kansas, the Shaggy Man, Button Bright, and Polychrome the Rainbow's daughter met on an enchanted road and followed it all the way to the marvelous land of Oz

Year: 1909 (1900s)

Authors: Baum, L. Frank (Lyman Frank), 1856-1919 Neill, John R. (John Rea), ill

Subjects: Fairy tales

Publisher: Chicago : Reilly & Lee

Contributing Library: New York Public Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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THE SHAGGY MANS OWN HEAD RESTORED The Road to Oz Course it is, replied the girl; and we re all as glad asyou are, Button-Bright. Well, announced the shaggy man, its my turn next.He took off his shaggy coat and laid it on the grass and divedhead first into the Truth Pond.

 

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When he came up the donkey head had disappeared, andthe shaggy mans own shaggy head was in its place, with thewater dripping in little streams from his shaggy whiskers. Hescrambled ashore and shook himself to get off some of the wet,and then leaned over the pool to look admiringly at his re-flected face. 150 The Truth Pond I may not be strictly beautiful, even now, he said to hiscompanions, who watched him with smiling faces; but I mso much handsomer than any donkey that I feel as proud as Ican be. You Jre all right, Shaggy Man, declared DorothyAnd Button-Bright is all right, too. So let s thank thrTruth Pond for being so nice, and start on our journey to theEmerald City. I hate to leave it, murmured the shaggy man, with asigh. A truth pond would nt be a bad thing to carry aroundwith us. But he put on his coat and started with the othersin search of some one to direct them on their way.

  

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The Emeralds play at Museo De Machina De Escribir during SxSW.

Myself at Carmelita's in St. Pete- April 2008.

Carmelita's- April 2008

Lycaenidae, Poritinae: Cyaniriodes libna andersonii

This is a not so common butterfly (here in Koh Phangan).

A closer view of the old Emerald, now 52 years old. Taken at the cruise port (Dassia, just north of Kerkyra) in Corfu in 2006.

I have a casual interest in old cruise ships. The Emerald was built in 1958 in Newport News, Virginia, USA. She has sailed under other names: the Regent Rainbow, Diamond Island, and the Santa Rosa. She is one of the few recent passenger liners which was built in the United States. She was taken out of operation in 2009.

 

She is owned by Louis Cruise Line and was operated most recently by Thomson.

Innishannon Steam & Vintage Rally 2012.

 

Preserved 1911 J & H McLaren Traction Engine "The Emerald" (Works No. 1244) at Upton, Cork 3rd June 2012.

Lycaenidae, Poritiinae: Cyaniriodes libna andersonii

Myself at Carmelita's in St. Pete- April 2008.

Identifier: illustrateddicti00moll

Title: An illustrated dictionary of words used in art and archaeology. Explaining terms frequently used in works on architecture, arms, bronzes, Christian art, colour, costume, decoration, devices, emblems, heraldry, lace, personal ornaments, pottery, painting, sculpture, &c., with their derivations

Year: 1883 (1880s)

Authors: Mollett, John W. (John William)

Subjects: Art -- Dictionaries Archaeology -- Dictionaries

Publisher: London, S. Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington

Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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Angel of the reign of Elizabeth. Angels, (Gr. ayytKos, a messenger) in Chris-tian Art are represented in nine degrees, whichare divided into three categories. The first con-sists of Seraphim, Cherubim, and Thrones ; the i6 WORDS USED IX

 

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Fig. 24. Anns of France with Angels as supporters. XIV. century. second of Dominations, Virtues, Powers ; andthe third of Princedoms, Archangels, and Angels.They are represented as young, to show theircontinued strength; winged as messengers ofspeed ; barefooted and girt to show their readi-ness ; in robes of white indicative of purity, orin cloth of gold for their glory ; the cloth of golddiapered with bands of precious stones ; theemerald, emblem of unfading youth ; the crystal,oi pnrity; the sapphire, oi celestial contemplation;and the ruby, of divine love. During the re-naissance, Pugin complains, the edifying andtraditional representations of angelic spirits wereabandoned, and, in lieu of the albc of purity andgolden vests of glory, the artists indulged inpretty cupids sporting in clouds, &c. Theproper attributes of the angels are trumpets, forthe voice of God; flaming swords, for the mrathof God; sceptres, for the/tT.VA of God; thuriblesor censers for \\\q. prayers of saints

  

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Identifier: cairojerusalemda01marg

Title: Cairo, Jerusalem, and Damascus:

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors: Margoliouth, David Samuel, 1858-1940. [from old catalog] Tyrwhitt, Walter Spencer-Stanhope, 1859-1932, [from old catalog] illus

Subjects:

Publisher: New York, Dodd, Mead and company

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

  

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in Street. The name is ordinarily made to in-clude three buildings, the hospital, the school, andthe mausoleum of the Sultan, which lay behind theothers. The building which they replaced belongedoriginally to the daughter of the Fatimide SultanAziz, and when taken over by Kalaun was in thepossession of an Ayyubid princess, to whom theEmerald Palace, part of the ancient Fatimide Palace,was given in exchange. The Fatimide princess hadbeen served in it by 8000 slave girls (if Orientalfigures are to be trusted)—a statement which indi-cates its size. A story similar to that connected withthe Tulun Mosque was excogitated to conceal thesource when the funds had been supplied for cover-ing the expense. The workmen when digging thesoil fortunately discovered sealed boxes containingjewels and coin in sufficient quantities to defray thewhole. The reason for this fiction was that greatviolence had been used by the contractor in employ-ing forced labour for the building. Ail the artisans, [ 124]

 

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THE FIRST MAMELUKE SOVEREIGNS we are told, in Cairo and Fostat were compelled towork at this and nothing else, no other orders ineither city being allowed to be attended to while îtwas being erected. Passers-by were compelled tastop, or if mounted to descend from their horses andcarry stones, and in order to supply materials, build-ings in the Island of Raudah were pulled down. Be-sides this it was generally supposed that the Ayyubidprincess had been turned out of her palace againsther will; though Makrizi observes about this that noresentment could justly be felt for the robbery ofthe Ayyubids, who themselves had robbed the Fati-mides. It would seem, however, that the mode inwhich the transformation of the building was carriedout gave great ofïence, and means had to be devisedto allay the agitation. The arrangements when thehospital was complète were said to be superior tothose of any similar institution. It was to be opento any number of persons for any length of time,whether mai

  

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Identifier: thirtyeighthannu665newy

Title: Thirty-eighth annual convention, American Bankers' Association, Detroit, September 9-14, 1912 : tours to Yellowstone National Park, Salt Lake City, Colorado Rockies, and Great Lakes via New York Central lines

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors: New York Central Railroad Company

Subjects: American Bankers Association

Publisher: [New York] : New York Central Lines

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

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weird attraction of thePaint Pots; the terrible majesty of the GiantessGeyser; the delicate sculpturings to be seen atPulpit Terrace; the fascinating ugliness of MudVolcano; the magnificence, opulence, andgrandeur of the Grand Canyon—these must beseen and felt to be understood, and cannot beset down adequately in words nor reproducedin pictures. There are about 3,coo hot springsand 100 geysers, nearly 30 waterfalls, 100prominent named mountain peaks, rangingfrom 6,500 to more than 11,000 feet in altitude,over 40 lakes, 150 streams having names, withmany canyons, valleys, and other physicalfeatures, besides bison, elk, deer, antelope,mountain sheep, pelicans, gull and other birds,and trout of various species, to interest one. The transportation in the Park—no rail-ways of any sort or automobiles being allowedtherein—is by means of large, stanch, easy-riding, four-horse stage coaches. The roads,sprinkled each day before departure of thecoaches, are now in splendid shape, being 25

 

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maintained by the Government, and this coach-ing trip is undoubtedly the finest thing of thesort in the country and a most agreeableinnovation and diversion for travelers, andeminently appropriate to the place. Only brief mention can be made of thewonders to be seen during the four days whichwill be spent here. There is something in thisgreat Park to appeal to everyone, somethingto measure up to each mans and eachwomans capacity for appreciation of scenicbeauty and grandeur. Those who stand un-moved at the flight of a geyser may findsupreme delight in watching the bears nearthe hotels in their frolics. Those unable toappreciate the marvelous beauties of theEmerald Pool, may enjoy the ride throughGibbon Canyon; the man who may not relishthe walk among the hot springs may find greatsport in catching trout from Yellowstone Lake. There is a hotel, thoroughly modern, ateach important place for sight-seeing in thePark. These hotels are all steam heated,electric lighted, etc. Old Faithful In

  

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Identifier: redemptionofegyp00worsuoft

Title: The redemption of Egypt

Year: 1899 (1890s)

Authors: Worsfold, W. Basil (William Basil), 1858-1939

Subjects: Egypt -- Description and travel

Publisher: London G. Allen

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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deour way southwards, reconnoitering the giant flank of CheopsPyramid as we passed; and then we struck across the sandyplain to the Pyramid of Chephren, and thence to the third, andlesser. Pyramid of Mycerinus. Here, resting under the shelterof the ruined walls of the Temple, which lies beneath the easternflank of the third Pyramid, we looked backwards across the levelstretch of white sand upon the Pyramid of Chephren, whichspread the whole extent of its southern side before our eyes,upon the Pyramid of Cheops, the three lesser Pyramids, and theemerald plains beyond. After we had gazed awhile, I unpacked my portfolio andbegan to sketch. As I proceeded with my task, the enormousbulk of the yellow mass in front of me grew upon my senses.It has been calculated that the Pyramid of Chephren containsmore than two million cubic yards of solid masonry, being somefive million tons in weight; while the Pyramid of Cheops, risingfrom a base little less than thirteen acres in extent, contains over

 

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a. c H THE PYRAMIDS 221 three million cubic yards of stone. But these figures told nieless than the black-robed Arabs that, moving across the plain ofsand, dwindled to ants as they approached the mighty triangleof stone. It was no business of mine to probe the secrets ofthe past, but, with this enormous flank before my eyes, it wasimpossible to avoid the questions, when, and how, and wherefore,had these gigantic masses been erected ? The account of Herodotus, the first traveller who carried anote-book, has not yet been superseded. He visited Egypt at thetime of the Persian domination, a century or so before Alexandersconquest introduced the era of the Ptolemies, and he has, there-fore, the advantage of Strabo by some four hundred years. Beforehe tells us the story of the building of the Pyramids, as he heardit on the spot, he records a pregnant statement which in itselfexplains the third of these questions—Why did the Egyptiankinofs cause their bodies to be buried in the heart of th

  

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Identifier: detroitthecityof00mich

Title: Detroit, "The city of the strait"; historical, descriptive, illustrated

Year: 1901 (1900s)

Authors: Michigan central railroad company. [from old catalog]

Subjects:

Publisher: Chicago, General passenger dept., Michigan central

Contributing Library: The Library of Congress

Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

  

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thicker in comparison than the height of the greatcataract. So level is the watershed of the great lakes that itwould take but little tilting of the saucer to spill the contentsin any direction. Niagara is geologically young. It had no existence in theearly da3^s when Lakes Michigan, Superior, and Huron,smaller than they now are, poured their waters out to thenorth or eastward. Lake Erie was not, and there was little,if anything, of what is now Lake Ontario. Then camethe glacial period, when the great ice sheet of the north,thousands of feet thick, came down even as far as the OhioRiver, carving new channels and plowing out Superior, Huron, and Michigan to greater depths and extent. But thesouth winds rallied and drove back the bold invader, slowlybut surely, never since to return from its Greenland fastnesses.These three great lakes were filled again as the ice fieldmelted and receded to the northeast, still covering and blockingthe valleys of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence. They found

 

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Ainericaji Fall Jrom below Goat Jsland. their outlet by the valley of the Trent into Lake Ontario(Iroquois, the geologists term the glacial lake), and thence tothe sea through the Mohawk and Hudson. It was but afeeble stream that ran from the little lake at the eastern end30 of Erie down to Iroquois, tumbling over the escarpment orbeach near St. Davids, west of Queenston. Some thousands of years later the St. Lawrence ran un-hindered to the sea, and lowered the level of Ontario until itswaters no longer sought the Mohawk. The slow and gradualtilting of the strata, still going on, closed the outlet of theTrent, and turned the waters of the great lakes southward,extending Lake Huron and. opening a new channel throughLake St, Clair and Detroit River into Lake Erie. Theemerald flood of gem-like purity, leaving its sediment in thelake basins, poured over the escarpment of the old Ontarioshore, perhaps a greater Niagara than we look upon to-day.Not, however, at St. Davids, as before the gla

  

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BEAUTIFUL BODIES Candid Brick Wall Shots @ the Emerald, Kansas City, MO - 03/28/2009

Taste of Edmonton 2008

Identifier: springcatalogofa00alex_3

Title: Spring catalog of Alexander's good seeds : the best that grow selected for the south

Year: 1918 (1910s)

Authors: Alexander Seed Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Vegetables Seeds Catalogs. Fruit Seeds Catalogs. Flowers Seeds Catalogs. Cottonseed Catalogs. Agriculture Equipment and supplies Catalogs.

Publisher: Augusta, Ga. : Alexander Seed Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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t, for shipment to the North. Pkt. 5c; ounce16c; yt lb. 40c; lb. $1.25; postpaid. Bibb Co., Ala., 1917.—Forward the enclosed orderat earliest date and send new catalog. We havebetter results from your seed than any.—T. Frazier. Hillsboro Co.. Fla., Jan. 29, 1917.—Send me yourcatalog. Have used your seed with good results andwant more.—J. M. Hemminger. Crisp Co., Ga., Jan. 24, 1917.—Mail enclosed orderfor seed at once. I find your seed are the best, iswhy I order from you.—Mrs. Eugenia Childree. Charleston Co., S. C, Aug. 14, 1917.—Find enclosed M25 cents for your Onion Seed Collection. I found theseed very fine that I ordered from you this spring.—Mrs. C. C. Marlow. McCormlck Co.. S. C April 23. 1917.—Enclosed findmoney order for which send me Watermelon seed byreturn mail. Have used your seed for years, andam delighted with them. Would not be without themas they are worth their weight In gold. I remain asever your customer.—A. B. Turman. SEE OTBSB VARIETIES QUOTED

 

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UIU1X us? (Page •leven) TSm^z<&LEXANDER$ fOOO SEED, c/fUGUSTA, ffi^^^gg S^llS:copyright:^ SS»^tSlS«»t are^MeVnt ffUEl ^of S^ffiTSSl S?a^°r- wl}en you eat them each one will taste the best. Be sure to Include a packet or morei of eachIn your order. They are very prolific and easy to grow. You will enjoy them immensely.SPECIAL OFFER:Three packets, one of each, ^|^^^ip(88SS^:registered:^^|^^fe^ Fordhook, or Sweet Martha 25 cents. ^^mm%\Wv\\MiWli iflil i Ml1KmeiOn bination of all thegood qualities of two g o o dmelons, the Emerald Gem andthe Jenny Llnd. From theEmerald Gem the Fordhookhas inherited that most lus-cious and much desired sal-mon flesh, but differs fromthe Gem in that the flesh isvery thick and solid, having«. very small seed cavity. The.hin, emerald green rind hav-ing the deep netting of thei Improved Jenny Lind, is veryfirm and consequently is an| i d e a 1 shipper, carrying tomost distant markets in per-fect condition. The flesh isex

  

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