new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged shenzhou

Explore #232 September 17, 2008

Hello FlickrWorld! Hello FlickrWorld! I glanced at this image and thought it was a peacock feather, but it's another great story about space-related cancer research has appeared on the International Space Station Research site: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/tackling... Happy and hopeful Friday to all!

 

Caption:Thyroid cancer cell line FTC-133 after four hours of exposure to simulated microgravity. Nuclei are stained blue, components of the cytoskeleton stained green and red. (Image credit: Team Daniela Grimm)

 

In space, things don’t always behave the way we expect them to. In the case of cancer, researchers have found that this is a good thing: some tumors seem to be much less aggressive in the microgravity environment of space compared to their behavior on Earth. This observation, reported in research published in February by the Federation of the American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) Journal, could help scientists understand the mechanism involved and develop drugs targeting tumors that don’t respond to current treatments. This work is the latest in a large body of evidence on how space exploration benefits those of us on Earth.

 

Research in the weightlessness of space offers unique insight into genetic and cellular processes that simply can’t be duplicated on Earth, even in simulated microgravity. “Microgravity can be approximated on Earth, but we know from the literature that simulated microgravity isn’t the same as the real thing,” says Daniela Gabriele Grimm, M.D., a researcher with the Department of Biomedicine, Pharmacology at Aarhus University in Aarhus, Denmark, and an author of the FASEB paper.

 

True weightlessness affects human cells in a number of ways. For one thing, cells grown in space arrange themselves into three-dimensional groupings, or aggregates, that more closely resemble what happens in the body. “Without gravitational pull, cells form three-dimensional aggregates, or spheroids,” Grimm explains. “Spheroids from cancer cells share many similarities with metastases, the cancer cells which spread throughout the body.” Determining the molecular mechanisms behind spheroid formation might therefore improve our understanding of how cancer spreads.

 

The FASEB paper resulted from an investigation in the Science in Microgravity Box (SIMBOX) facility aboard Shenzhou-8, launched in 2011. Cells grown in space and in simulated microgravity on the ground were analyzed for changes in gene expression and secretion profiles, with the results suggesting decreased expression of genes that indicate high malignancy in cancer cells.

 

The work was funded by a grant from the German Space Life Sciences program, managed by the German space agency, DLR, in collaboration with Chinese partners.

 

Grimm and her colleagues are following up with additional research, a Nanoracks Cellbox investigation called “Effect of microgravity on human thyroid carcinoma cells,” scheduled to launch in March on SpaceX's third commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. Another follow-up investigation, “Spheroids,” is planned in 2015. The overall goal is to find as many genes and proteins as possible that are affected by microgravity and to identify the cellular activities they influence. Researchers can then use this information to develop new strategies for cancer research.

 

In a recent paper published in Nature Reviews Cancer, Jeanne Becker, Ph.D., a cell biologist at Nano3D Biosciences in Houston and principal investigator for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System (CBOSS) 1-Ovarian study, examined nearly 200 papers on cell biology research in microgravity during four decades. This body of work shows that not only does the architecture of cells change in microgravity, but the immune system also is suppressed. Other studies in addition to Grimm’s have shown microgravity-induced changes in gene expression. The key variable, Becker concluded, is gravity. And the only way to really mitigate gravity is to go into space.

 

Read entire story:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/tackling...

 

More about space station research:

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

 

_____________________________________________

These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin...

  

Baywatch lifeguard station, origins unknown, surrounded by seismometers

Western Sinus Meridiani / Martian Sea

 

Last known Taikonaut transmission, circa November 2023

红色龙 Mars Mission / Shenzhou-17

China National Space Administration Archives

  

.

中国长征-2F运载火箭和神舟号飞船

China CZ-2F freight rocket & Shenzhou space ship

Designer: Yang Liqun (杨立群)

1985, April

Dragons rise over the Divine Land [China]

Long teng shenzhou (龙腾神州)

Call nr.: BG E15/517 (Landsberger collection)

 

More? See: chineseposters.net

China National Space Administration (CNSA) yesterday "parked" the first module of the new space station on the brink of the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

 

Module was developed as part of Chinese range of Shenzhou spacecrafts. It was launched almost five years ago in total secrecy, to assure Chinese primacy in asteroid belt, making advantage of and coinciding with the severe funding cuts in NASA's R&D programmes, as well as Russian RFSA and EU's ESA each being preoccupied with manufacturing and launching their own global positioning satellites (GLONASS and Galileo arrays).

 

Space station is the first step toward exploitation of huge mineral and other deposits and their transportation to Earth, as well as building first human truly permanent settlements in space.

 

We bring you the exclusive early shots of the space station's surroundings, recorded by its cameras.

 

---

Not 'shopped

Should be viewed large on black

Shenzhou by Simon Packhard 2008 at Addison House Health Centre

Watercolor on paper; 26 x 39.5 cm.

  

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

   

Oil on paper; 18 x 26 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

   

via

 

Hong Kong (CNN)The search for alien life just got bigger. A lot bigger.

 

The world’s largest telescope will be completed this week in China and it has scientists very, very excited.

 

With a whopping 1,640 feet (500 meter) wide dish the size of 30 football fields, the telescope will able to detect radio signals — and potentially signs of life — from distant planets.

 

“China’s latest telescope will be able to look faster and further than past searches for extraterrestrial intelligence,” says Douglas Vakoch, president of METI International, an organization dedicated to detecting alien intelligence.

 

Cradled in a karst hollow in the mountainous landscape of southwest China, the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope, or FAST, starts operation September 25.

 

It’s a process known by astronomers as “first light” — when a telescope opens its eyes and takes its first pictures of the universe.

 

And FAST is wide eyed: its field of vision is almost twice as big as the Arecibo telescope in Puerto Rico that has been the world’s biggest single aperture telescope for the past 53 years.

 

Russia’s RATAN-600 telescope is larger than FAST by diameter with panels arranged in a 576 meter wide ring — but it’s not one single dish and its collection area is much smaller than FAST and Arecibo.

 

Decade to find right location

 

Construction of the $185 million mega project began in 2011, with the last of the 4,450 triangular panels that form the dish painstakingly lowered into place in July this year.

 

While the structure itself is too big to move, each of the panels can be adjusted.

 

“You can control the surface to point at certain points in the sky. A mesh of steel ropes allows a hydraulic push and pull mechanism,” says Andreas Wicenec, professor of Data Intensive Research at the International Center for Radio Astronomy Research in Australia.

 

Its remote location in China’s Guizhou province was one of 400 places scientists surveyed over 10 years. The egg-cup shaped valley is perfectly sized and the surrounding mountains provide a shield against radio frequency interference.

 

It was once home to “Green Water Village” a remote settlement of 12 families that had no electricity. The 65 villagers are among 9,110 that authorities uprooted in order to help improve the telescope’s listening capabilities.

 

“I never thought the first time I would move would be to make way for a telescope,” former villager Yang Chaolan, 62 told Xinhua, China’s official news agency.

 

Her son plans to open a restaurant in the town they have been relocated to in the hope the feat of engineering will bring tourists to the poor region.

 

But for many people, the most exciting goal is the search for extraterrestrial life.

 

The recent discovery of three life-friendly planets outside our solar system has rekindled discussion of whether intelligent life is unique to Earth.

 

FAST’s sensitivity will be capable of detecting exoplanets like these in ways that other telescopes cannot.

 

“FAST’s potential to discover an alien civilization will be five to 10 (times) that of current equipment, as it can see farther and darker planets,” Peng Bo, director of the NAO Radio Astronomy Technology Laboratory, told Xinhua.

 

Ambitions space program

 

FAST also underpins China’s bold space program, which is kicking into high gear.

 

Last week, Beijing launched the Tiangong-2 space lab — a precursor to a 20 ton space station. It’s also set for its longest crewed mission in October aboard the Shenzhou-11 spacecraft.

 

China’s ‘Cape Canaveral’

 

Next space superpower?

 

Moon’s dark side to be explored

 

Top astronaut wants cooperation

 

China plans Mars rover

 

Photos show moon’s surface

 

China’s space race

 

How astronauts prepare

 

Longer term goals include putting a man on the moon and sending a robotic probe to Mars.

 

The telescope could help track some of these missions, says Wicenec.

 

However, there are limitations on what the telescope can do. It’s unable to project the trajectories of comets or asteroids for example.

 

“FAST may help explain the origin of the universe and the structure of the cosmos, but it won’t provide warning of Earth-bound asteroids that could destroy human civilization,” says Vakoch.

 

China has long been secretive about its military-linked space program, but the scientists CNN spoke to for this piece expected Beijing to be open to international cooperation.

 

Chinese astronomers are expected to receive priority on the telescope for the two to three years and then it will be opened to scientists worldwide.

 

“It’s a prestige project but astronomy is very international. China is no exception,” says Wicenec.

 

Read more: edition.cnn.com/

 

The post China’s giant space telescope starts search for alien life appeared first on AlienVirals.com - Latest Alien & UFO News.

 

www.alienvirals.com/chinas-giant-space-telescope-starts-s...

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

Handscroll; ink on paper; 29.2 x 453.1 cm.

  

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

Oil on board; 35 x 24 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

  

Hanging scroll; ink and color on paper; Image: 152.4 x 62,9 cm.

 

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

 

Dragon kit, 1/72nd scale, modified to add space walker

So aggressively small! If you squint and engage your imagination drive, you can clearly see Michael Burnham through the battle ruptured hull, trapped behind a brig force field. She's trying to sweet talk the ship's computer into a totally legit explosive decompression.

 

mecabricks.com/en/user/paulygon

www.etsy.com/shop/Paulygons

72.5 x 60.5 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Oil on paper; 25 x 31.5 cm.

 

Born in Shanghai in 1893, Chen traveled to study art under Fujisima Takeji in Japan in 1913, graduated from Tokyo Art School in 1921 and returned to China later year. Chen then taught at several institutions including Xinhua Art School, Shenzhou Girls’ School and Shanghai Fine Art School. He then established Xiyang Art School at his private residence where he started to write about art and taught western painting. In 1942, he published an article on the western painting movement in Shanghai Art Exhibition monthly. His solo exhibitions include Baoyi Individual Exhibition at Shanghai Ningbo Town’s Fellow Association, Shanghai (1925) and Individual Exhibition for Chen Baoyi at the Lida Institute in 1927. in 1939, he held a Joint Oil Painting Exhibition together with Zhou Bichu, Song Zhongyuan, Zhu Qizhan and Qian Ding at the Gallery of Shanghai Daxin Company. He passed away in Shanghai in 1945.

   

Medium Ink and colors on paper; mounted as a hanging scroll; 193.8 x 98.1 cm.

 

Shen Zhou (Chinese: 沈周; pinyin: Shěn Zhōu, 1427–1509), courtesy name Qinan (启南), was a Chinese painter in the Ming dynasty. Shen Zhou was born into a wealthy family in Xiangcheng, near the thriving city of Suzhou, in the Jiangsu province, China. His genealogy traces his family’s wealth to the late Yuan period, but only as far as Shen’s paternal great-grandfather, Shen Liang-ch’en, who became a wealthy landowner following the dissolution of Mongol rule. After the collapse of the Yuan and the emergence of the new Ming dynasty, the position of tax collector was assigned to the head of the Shen family, under the Hongwu emperor’s new lijia system. This steadily and amply increased the family’s wealth, while freeing Shen Liang-ch’en’s male descendants from obligatory careers as Ming officials, and allowing them to live the majority of their lives as retired scholar-artists. Upon the death of his father, Shen Heng-chi, Shen Zhou decided to forgo official examinations and devote his life to the care of his widowed mother, Chang Su-wan. It is probable that he never intended to become an official, but refrained from making this obvious until his father had died. He thus renounced the life of official service while still preserving his reputation in an enduring act of filial piety. In this way, he was able to live a reclusive life, free of responsibility (except that of caring for his mother), and devote his time to artwork, socializing, and monastic contemplation of the natural world around him.

 

Shen Zhou lived at a pivotal point in the history of Chinese painting, and contributed greatly to the artistic tradition of China, founding the new Wu School in Suzhou. Under the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), painters had practiced with relative freedom, cultivating a more “individualist,” innovative approach to art that deviated noticeably from the more superficial style of the Song masters who preceded them. However, at the outset of the Ming, the Hongwu emperor (reg 1368-1398) decided to import the existing master painters to his court in Nanjing, where he had the ability to cultivate their styles to conform to the paintings of the Song masters. As Hongwu was notorious for his attempts to marginalize and persecute the scholar class, this was seen as an attempt to banish the gentry’s influence from the arts. The dominant style of the Ming court painters was called the Zhe School. However, following the ascension of the Yongle emperor (reg 1403-1424), the capital was moved from Nanjing to Beijing, putting a large distance between imperial influence and the city of Suzhou. These new conditions led to the rise of the Wu School of painting, a somewhat subversive style that revived the ideal of the inspired scholar-painter in Ming China.

 

Shen Zhou’s scholarly upbringing and artistic training had instilled in him a reverence for China’s historical tradition that influenced both his life and his art from an early age. He was accomplished in history and the classics, and his paintings reveal a disciplined obedience to the styles of the Yuan dynasty, to China’s history, and to the orthodox Confucianism that he embodied in his filial life. He is most famous for his landscapes and for his “boneless” renderings of flowers, which are meticulously created in the style of the Yuan masters. However, he did not always paint within strict boundaries. His inherited prosperity afforded him the luxury of painting independently of patrons, and he did so in a way that, while revealing his historical influence, was uniquely his own. Shen possessed a large collection of paintings from the late Yuan and early Ming, which he and his scholar-painter colleagues used as models in forging the revivalist approach of the Wu style. He frequently combined experimental elements with the more rigid styles of the Yuan masters. Much of his work was done in collaboration with others, combining painting, poetry, and calligraphy at gatherings with his literati friends. It was upon these ideals that his Wu School was founded. For Wu painters, painting was a meditation, rather than an occupation. Shen Zhou never coveted his paintings, although they were frequently coveted and imitated by others. Through Shen Zhou’s eyes, a painting was not a commodity, but the very extension of the painter himself.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shen_Zhou

  

中國「遠望六號」國家航天測量船

China's Yuanwang-6 Space Tracking Ship.

 

The purpose of building ocean-going space tracking ships in China is to perform maritime tracking and control duties for satellites and manned spacecrafts. Being the latest and most advanced space tracking ship of China, Yuanwang-6 is equipped with and makes use of the new and high technologies of maritime meteorology, electronics, mechanics, optics, communication and computing for its missions. Yuanwang-6 successfully performed maritime tracking and remote control of "Shenzhou 7" spacecraft during a mission jointly carried out by other ships of the "Yuanwang" fleet in September 2008.

 

Ocean Terminal, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

Photo taken at The Dunes Golf Club at Shenzhou Peninsula on Hainan Island, China.

Camera: Apple iPhone 4S

Processing: Snapseed and Aperture 3.0.

Photo taken at The Dunes Golf Club at Shenzhou Peninsula on Hainan Island, China.

Camera: Apple iPhone 4S

Processing: Snapseed and Aperture 3.0.

- DSC_1308s

© 2013 Chris Aston - Some rights reserved.

 

Wangfujing, Beijing, June 11th 2013, 17:56.

 

Seen in China Digital Times, Photo of the Day, Jun 11th 2013:

chinadigitaltimes.net/2013/06/photo-shenzhou-10-spaceship...

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

The Chinese Shenzhou 9 Re-Entry Module on display in an one-off Shenzhou 9 Mission Exhibition in Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

This module carried 3 crew members during the mission, included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, launched at 18:37:24 CST (10:37:24 UTC), 16 June 2012. Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June.

 

The mission's launch was 49 years to the day after that of the first woman in space, cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova.

 

Shenzhou 9 docked with China's first space lab Tiangong-1 at 06:07 UTC on 18 June, marking China's first manned spacecraft rendezvous and docking. This docking was remotely controlled from a ground station. After about 3 hours, when the pressures inside the vessels were equalized, Jing Haipeng entered into Tiangong-1. Six days later, Shenzhou 9 detached from the station and then redocked manually under the control of crew member Liu Wang, making it the first manual docking for the Chinese program.

This is a full build and review of the Trumpeter® 1/72 Chinese Shenzhou 5 Spacecraft #01615 by Doug Cole for Right On Replicas.

 

For more information go to: www.rightonreplicas.com

 

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Photo taken at The Dunes Golf Club at Shenzhou Peninsula on Hainan Island, China.

Camera: Apple iPhone 4S

Processing: Snapseed and Aperture 3.0.

The Chinese Shenzhou 9 Re-Entry Module on display in an one-off Shenzhou 9 Mission Exhibition in Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

This module carried 3 crew members during the mission, included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, launched at 18:37:24 CST (10:37:24 UTC), 16 June 2012. Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June.

 

The mission's launch was 49 years to the day after that of the first woman in space, cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova.

 

Shenzhou 9 docked with China's first space lab Tiangong-1 at 06:07 UTC on 18 June, marking China's first manned spacecraft rendezvous and docking. This docking was remotely controlled from a ground station. After about 3 hours, when the pressures inside the vessels were equalized, Jing Haipeng entered into Tiangong-1. Six days later, Shenzhou 9 detached from the station and then redocked manually under the control of crew member Liu Wang, making it the first manual docking for the Chinese program.

中國「遠望六號」國家航天測量船

China's Yuanwang-6 Space Tracking Ship.

 

The purpose of building ocean-going space tracking ships in China is to perform maritime tracking and control duties for satellites and manned spacecrafts. Being the latest and most advanced space tracking ship of China, Yuanwang-6 is equipped with and makes use of the new and high technologies of maritime meteorology, electronics, mechanics, optics, communication and computing for its missions. Yuanwang-6 successfully performed maritime tracking and remote control of "Shenzhou 7" spacecraft during a mission jointly carried out by other ships of the "Yuanwang" fleet in September 2008.

 

Ocean Terminal, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

A Long March carrier rocket carrying China's Shenzhou VII spacecraft ignites during launch at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu province at 21:10 on Thursday, September 25, 2008.

This is a full build and review of the Trumpeter® 1/72 Chinese Shenzhou 5 Spacecraft #01615 by Doug Cole for Right On Replicas.

 

For more information go to: www.rightonreplicas.com

 

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Shenzhou IVA (神舟) space suit.

 

Photo taken from an one off Shenzhou 9 Exhibition in the Hong Kong Science Museum.

 

Shenzhou 9 was a manned spacecraft flight of China's Shenzhou program, Shenzhou 9 was the second spacecraft and first manned spacecraft to dock with the Tiangong 1 space station, which took place on 18 June. The mission's crew included the first Chinese female astronaut, Liu Yang.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shenzhou_9

Photo taken at The Dunes Golf Club at Shenzhou Peninsula on Hainan Island, China.

Camera: Apple iPhone 4S

Processing: Snapseed and Aperture 3.0.

A Long March carrier rocket carrying China's Shenzhou VII spacecraft ignites during launch at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu province at 21:10 on Thursday, September 25, 2008.

The manned spacecraft Shenzhou-9, docked with the Tiangong-1 space station, pass by a crescent Venus, 19:42UT 19th June 2012, Brisbane, Australia (5:42am, 20th June. local time)

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 23 24