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Inspired by Hoagy Carmichaels' lyrics from 'Stardust'

I put this video up yesterday, but had forgotten about the 3 min video limitation on Flickr, so I took it down because I had edited it to a certain piece of music, and I didn't like it cut off 37 seconds short. I then put it up on an old YouTube site of mine, but today I decided to put it up here anyway, because I really wanted it up in a place where more people from SL might see it, and perhaps enjoy remembering this wonderful place, and an earlier time in SL. For those who might like to see the longer complete version of this video, you can go to this link:

 

youtu.be/mWvRmD2-btQ

 

This video was made from various video clips I took that day while riding around in the boat with AM. His build, The Ferry, along with its predecessor Husk, were two of my favorite builds of his, not only for the sheer beauty of them, with AM's exquisite attention to detail, but for the feeling of peace that you could find in them. They existed in the virtual world of Second Life but are fondly remembered by me as very real places.

 

Over the years I recorded quite a few video clips while in Second Life, which I hope to get up online at some point. Most of those clips were taken on AM Radio's builds, because they were the places that inspired me the most. These video captures were rarely planned out, but usually quite spontaneous, either trying to capture a mood, or trying to convey the feeling of being in AM's builds, and sometimes just to remember a moment.

 

Most of the time the music playing on the sim at the time I was filming was recorded also. AM usually had the channel on his sims set to Magnatune, and the type of music on that channel always seemed to fit well with the mood of his sims. Some of the time the music itself playing on the sim is what inspired me to make a video.

 

When I took the video clips of The Ferry this particular time, I somehow didn't have it set right to record sound, so it was silent. It took me quite a while to get around to editing the clips for this video which were captured back in Sept 2010, and because there was no sound recorded, I had to hunt for some sound that would work well with it. Since AM's beautifully designed boat was based on a 1940's Cris Craft Runabout, I looked for music from around that period of time. When I came across the 1940 instrumental of "Stardust" by Artie Shaw, one of the great jazz clarinetists, composers, and big bandleaders from that time, it seemed to work really well with the feeling of the scene, and the movement of the boat.

 

Stardust was originally composed by Hoagy Carmichael in 1927. Later in 1929, Michael Parish, in collaboration with Carmichael, wrote lyrics for the song, retaining the original title that Carmichael had given it when he wrote it. According to Wiki: "it is one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, with over 1,500 total recordings. In 2004, Carmichael's original 1927 recording of the song was one of 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. "Stardust" is considered by many the finest song ever written."

 

The Ferry no longer exists in SL, so I hope for those who knew it and loved it as much as I did, this will bring back good memories. And for those who have never been on an AM Radio sim, I hope this video might give you some idea of what it was like to be on this extraordinary sim...a virtual place that seemed almost real.

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

January 30, 2018.

Rollei 35 (Rollei Tessar 40mm f/3.5).

Kentmere 100 in caffenol 12:00.

(per liter: soda 32g, vit C 18g, coffee 42.5g).

Scanned PrimeFilmXE, Silverfast sw.

Post process PS Elements, Silver Efex Pro.

.

These curdled clouds brought an old Hoagy Carmichael song to mind, hence the picture's title: www.youtube.com/watch?v=fOgrjd9NKF0..

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Diffrection in action!

No "star filter" used, just my lovely Fujinon 55 stopped down to f11 or f16

John Smith, Robert Fuller, Hoagy Carmichael and John Crawford Jnr. From Photoplay (UK), 1960.

The seated statue of Hoagy Carmichael at my alma mater, Indiana University, Bloomington.

 

Camera used was a Pentax K100D, lens used was a manual focus M42 Pentax Super Multi Coated Takumar 55mm 1.8. Aperture was around 2.8-4.

 

The 55mm 1.8 might be the Jan Brady of the S-M-C line with a lot of attention placed on the S-M-C 50mm 1.4. Both are excellent lenses though and very sharp.

 

Shot in RAW and converted in Apple Aperture with the finishing touches made in Adobe Photoshop. All work done on a MAC.

Diffrection in action!

No "star filter" used, just my lovely Fujinon 55 stopped down to f11 or f16

The seated statue of Hoagy Carmichael at my alma mater, Indiana University, Bloomington.

 

Camera used was a Pentax K100D, lens used was a manual focus M42 Pentax Super Multi Coated Takumar 55mm 1.8. Aperture was around 2.8-4.

 

The 55mm 1.8 might be the Jan Brady of the S-M-C line with a lot of attention placed on the S-M-C 50mm 1.4. Both are excellent lenses though and very sharp.

 

Shot in RAW and converted in Apple Aperture with the finishing touches made in Adobe Photoshop. All work done on a MAC.

Close-up of Hoagy Carmichael statue at Indiana University Bloomington

When I thought of the title, I didn't know who this was...I've since found out that it is Hoagy Carmichael. This wonderful sculpture is on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington. Forgive my processing...the background was way too distracting. Have a great Wednesday.

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

Here's a nice Durutti Column single from June 1983 - "I Get Along Without You Very Well" c/w "Prayer".

 

A-side is cover of a Hoagy Carmichael tune. The woman singing is Lindsay Wilson, Tony's former wife. The AA-side is a lovely instrumental featuring Maunagh Fleming on cor anglais.

 

Sleeve is by Mark Farrow, production is by Be Music (New Order's Bernard Sumner, I think).

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

This bronze sculpture of composer, performer, and actor Hoagy Carmichael is located just north of the Auditiorium on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington, Indiana. The shot was taken early one September morning after an overnight rainstorm, accounting for the raindrops on the piano. Someone had placed a rose from the surrounding flower garden in his left hand the night before. Although I thought about removing it, I decided to leave it as I liked the effect.

Hoagy Carmichael cameo on the Flintstones . ...For his September 15, 1961 animated guest appearance in "The Hit Songwriters" episode of The Flintstones, Hoagy wrote and performed a song created especially for the show, "Yabba-Dabba-Dabba-Dabba-Doo" -he appeared as Stoney Carmichael . (wikipedia) although the Flintstones and Rubbles in the cartoon called him Hoagey, not Stoney..

SDASM.CATALOG: Karaberis_0020

SDASM.TITLE: Hoagy Carmichael @ NAS Alameda Station Theatre

SDASM.DATE: 23-Sep-51

SDASM.LOCATION: NAS Alameda, CA

SDASM.ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: CDR. Karaberis shacking hands @ Bing

My Christmas Song For You (sheet music) Recorded by Hoagy Carmichael and his Music American Recording Artists...Words & Music by Furniss Peterson, Paul Francis Webster & Hoagy Carmichael.

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4sXdyRPD5E

 

This was a photo illustration created in Photoshop to show what the mural would look like after it was painted.

 

Behind Hoagy Carmichael statue

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

The Starr-Gennett Music Heritage Site

South 1st Street, Richmond, Indiana

www.navemastudios.com

 

LABEL HISTORY

Gennett Records was founded in Richmond, Indiana by the Starr Piano Company, and released its first records in October 1917. The company took its name from its top managers: Harry, Fred and Clarence Gennett. Earlier, the company had produced recordings under the Starr Records label.

Gennett set up recording studios in New York City and later, in 1921, set up a second studio on the grounds of the piano factory in Richmond, Indiana under the supervision of Ezra C.A. Wickemeyer.

  

Gennett is best remembered for the wealth of early jazz talent recorded on the label, including sessions by Jelly Roll Morton, Bix Beiderbecke, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, "King" Joe Oliver's band with the young Louis Armstrong, Lois Deppe's Serenaders with the young Earl Hines, Hoagy Carmichael, Duke Ellington, The Red Onion Jazz Babies,The State Street Ramblers, Zach Whyte and his Chocolate Beau Brummels, Alphonse Trent and his Orchestra and many others. Gennett also recorded early blues artists such as Thomas A. Dorsey, Sam Collins, Jaybird Coleman, and Big Boy Cleveland and early "hillbilly" or country music performers such as Vernon Dalhart, Bradley Kincaid, Ernest Stoneman, Fiddlin' Doc Roberts, and Gene Autry. Many early religious recordings were made by Homer Rodeheaver, early shape note singers and others.

  

The Gennett Company was hit severely by the Great Depression in 1930, and massively cut back on record recording and production until it was halted altogether in 1934. At this time the only product Gennett Records produced under its own name was a series of recorded sound effects for use by radio stations. In 1935 the Starr Piano Company sold some Gennett masters, and the Gennett and Champion trademarks to Decca Records.

 

The Starr record plant soldiered on under the supervision of Harry Gennett through the remainder of the decade by offering contract pressing services. For a time the Starr Piano Company was the principal manufacturer of Decca records, but much of this business dried up after Decca purchased its own pressing plant in 1938. In the years remaining before World War II, Gennett did contract pressing for a number of New York-based jazz and folk music labels, including Joe Davis, Keynote and Asch.

 

After Decca opened a new pressing plant in Pinckneyville, Illinois in 1956, the old Gennett plant in Richmond, Indiana was sold to Mercury Records in 1958. Mercury operated the historic plant until 1969 when it moved to a nearby modern plant later operated by Cinram.

 

The Gennett company produced the Gennett, Starr, Champion, Superior, and Van Speaking labels, and also produced some Supertone, Silvertone, and Challenge records under contract. The firm pressed most Autograph, Rainbow, Hitch, KKK, Our Song, and Vaughn records under contract.

 

GENNETT WALK OF FAME

 

In September 2007, the Starr-Gennett Foundation began to recognize the most important Gennett artists on a Walk of Fame near the site of Gennett's Richmond, Indiana recording studio.

 

The Gennett Walk of Fame is located along South 1st Street in Richmond at the site of the Starr Piano Company and embedded in the Whitewater Gorge Trail, which connects to the longer Cardinal Greenway Trail. Both trails are part of the American Discovery Trail, the only coast-to-coast, non-motorized recreational trail.

 

Markers are three-dimensional, cast bronze and colored tile mosaic emblems in the form of 78 rpm phonograph records. Each marker features the classic Gennett label design and an artistic mosaic rendering of the represented musician. A smaller bronze plaque is installed next to each record to recognize the accomplishments of the inductee. The Foundation estimates that the Walk of Fame eventually will contain up to 80 markers.

 

The Foundation convened its National Advisory Board for the first time in January, 2006, to select the first 10 inductees for the Gennett Records Walk of Fame. The Advisory Board selects inductees from these categories: classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel (African-American and Southern), American popular song, ethnic, historic/spoken, and classical, giving preference to classic jazz, old-time country, blues, gospel, and American popular song.

 

The Advisory Board's consensus selection for the first inductee in the Gennett Walk of Fame was Louis Armstrong. The following is a list of the first ten inductees:

Louis Armstrong

Bix Beiderbecke

Jelly Roll Morton

Hoagy Carmichael

Gene Autry

Vernon Dalhart

Big Bill Broonzy

Georgia Tom

Joe "King" Oliver

Lawrence Welk

A second set of ten nominees was inducted in 2008:

Homer Rodeheaver

Fats Waller

Duke Ellington

Uncle Dave Macon

Coleman Hawkins

Charley Patton

Sidney Bechet

Blind Lemon Jefferson

Fletcher Henderson

Guy Lombardo

2009 Inductees:

Artie Shaw

Wendell Hall

Bradley Kincaid

Ernest Stoneman & Hattie Frost Stoneman

New Orleans Rhythm Kings

2010 Inductees:

Alberta Hunter

Lonnie Johnson

Pace Jubilee Singers

2011 Inductees:

Roosevelt Sykes

Bailey's Lucky Seven

2012 Inductees:

Scrapper Blackwell

Jelly Roll Morton

2013 Inductee:

William Jennings Bryan

my near daily dilemma.

color or black and white...

 

i never know the right answer.

posting both again.

 

i actually prefer the b/w, but there is something sad about taking the colors away when the sun is so nice.

 

song of the day: the nearness of you, by hoagy carmichael.

Hoagy Carmichael statue

Widelux panorama 35mm camera on Kodak HIE infra-red film.

I wish I could remember who this was...

Thanks for figuring it out mom! Hoagy Carmichael. He apparently wrote Stardust here in Richmond.

Over the shoulder of Hoagy

Hoagy Carmichael, born in Bloomington, was an American composer, pianist, singer, actor, and bandleader.

 

He was also an alumni of IU law school.

Hoagy Carmichael statue near the IU Auditorium

Hoagy Carmichael mural. Richmond was a recording center at one time.

This bronze sculpture of composer, performer, and actor Hoagy Carmichael is located just north of the Auditiorium on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington, Indiana. The shot was taken early one September morning after an overnight rainstorm, accounting for the raindrops on the piano. Someone had placed a rose from the surrounding flower garden in his left hand the night before. Although I thought about removing it, I decided to leave it as I liked the effect.

Here's a nice Durutti Column single from June 1983 - "I Get Along Without You Very Well" c/w "Prayer".

 

A-side is cover of a Hoagy Carmichael tune. The woman singing is Lindsay Wilson, Tony's former wife.

 

Sleeve is by Mark Farrow, production is by Be Music (New Order's Bernard Sumner, I think).

Grave of Howard Hoagland "Hoagy" Carmichael in Rose Hill Cemetery, Bloomington, Indiana. Band Leader Hoagy Carmichael wrote and performed throughout the 1930s, 1940s, & 1950s. He wrote or cowrote four of music's most recorded songs: "Stardust", "The Nearness of You", "Heart and Soul", and "Georgia On My Mind". He also appeared in 12 movies.

 

Born: 22 November 1899

Died: 27 December 1981

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