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Citation de Marie Corelli.

 

I do not need to get married. I have three pets at home that fulfill the same role as husband. I have a dog that growls in the morning, a parrot that swears the afternoon and a cat that comes home late at night.

Chapel of the Holy Cross, Sedona

Most people never get to see the Chapel like this.

 

Some history as per Wikipedia:

The chapel was inspired and commissioned by local rancher and sculptor Marguerite Brunswig Staude, who had been inspired in 1932 by the newly constructed Empire State Building to build such a church. After an attempt to do so in Europe, with the help of the noted architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, was aborted due to the outbreak of World War II, she decided to build the church in her native region.[2]

 

Richard Hein was chosen as project architect, and the design was executed by architect August K. Strotz, both from the firm of Anshen & Allen. The chapel is built on Coconino National Forest land; the late Senator Barry Goldwater assisted Staude in obtaining a special-use permit. The construction supervisor was Fred Courkos, who built the chapel in 18 months at a cost of US$300,000. The chapel was completed in 1956.[3]

 

The American Institute of Architects gave the Chapel its Award of Honor in 1957. In the sculptor's words, “Though Catholic in faith, as a work of art the Chapel has a universal appeal. Its doors will ever be open to one and all, regardless of creed, that God may come to life in the souls of all men and be a living reality.”

 

In 2007, Arizonans voted the Chapel to be one of the Seven Man-Made Wonders of Arizona,[4] and it is also the site of one of the so-called Sedona vortices.[citation needed]

Southern Black Racer in my backyard palm tree. Winter Park, FL. SOOC. From the Wikipedia article:

 

Coluber constrictor priapus, commonly known as the southern black racer, is one of the more common subspecies of nonvenomous Coluber constrictor snakes in the Southeastern United States. The name priapus refers to the proximal spines of the hemipenes being much enlarged into basal hooks, which is characteristic of this subspecies.[1] These snakes are quite active during the day, which increases the chance of sightings. They will eat almost any animal they can overpower, including, rodents, frogs, toads, and lizards. They have been known to charge at people in an attempt to frighten them,[citation needed] but will usually retreat if challenged. They are not venomous. Members of this species generally do not tolerate handling – even after months in captivity – and will typically strike and flail wildly every time they are handled. These snakes are usually thin with a jet black dorsal side with a grey belly and white chin. They are quite fast, giving rise to the name "racer".

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coluber_constrictor_priapus

Bleskensgraaf is a town in the Dutch province of South Holland. It is a part of the municipality of Graafstroom, and lies about 10 km northeast of Dordrecht. It has an area of 1272 hectares. On 1 January 2009 Bleskensgraaf and Hofwegen had 2797 inhabitants in 936 residences.[citation needed]

Until 1855, Bleskensgraaf was a separate municipality. In 1855 the municipality Bleskensgraaf and the heerlijkheid or seigniory 'Hofwegen' merged into one municipality named 'Bleskensgraaf and Hofwegen'. In 1986 it became the new municipality Graafstroom together with 6 adjacent towns. The town hall of Graafstroom is located in Bleskensgraaf.

The town got its name because of the landlord (count) "Willem van Blassekijn". Over the years the name Blassekijnsgraeve changed into Bleskensgraaf.

On letters it often says "Bleskensgraaf CA". CA stands for 'cum annexis' which means 'with surroundings'.

The centre of Bleskensgraaf is made up out of new buildings. The old centre was bombarded during the Second World War at 06:25 on 12 May 1940. Seven people died and forty houses were destroyed. The town hall was leveled and the church sustained irreparable damage. The reconstruction was fast and took a couple of years. In September 1948 the new church officially opened and the new town hall opened on 12 May 1955.

Old buildings that remain are a couple of windmills: flourmill 'Molen de Vriendschap' (Mill the Friendship) built in 1890 and two Hollow post mills, named the 'Hofwegense Molen' and the 'Wingerdse Molen' built in 1513 and many old farmhouses.

Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved MJMourik.

 

Veluwe:

The Veluwe is a forest-rich ridge of hills in the province of Gelderland in the Netherlands. The Veluwe features many different landscapes including woodland, heath, some small lakes and Europe's largest sand drifts. The Veluwe is the largest moraine complex in the Netherlands, stretching 60 km from north to south, and reaching heights of up to 110 meters. The Veluwe was formed by the Saalian glacial during the Pleistocene epoch, some 200,000 years ago. Glaciers some 200 meters thick[citation needed] pushed the sand deposits in the Rhine and Maas Delta sideways, creating the hills which now form most of the Veluwe. Because the hills are made of sand, rain water disappears rapidly, and then it flows at a depth of tens of meters to the edges where it reaches the surface again.

 

Originally the Veluwe was surrounded by a string of swamps, heavily populated with game such as deer and wild boars because these areas offered rich vegetation to feed on. Since the 1990s many plans are underway, or have already been implemented, to restore these wetlands by blocking the drainage systems built by farmers during the last 150 years. This results in very dry heathland changing into wetland within a span of just a few hundred meters. The Wisselse Veen near the village of Epe, on the North West Veluwe, offers a good example of this.

In the center of the southern Veluwe lies a national park, the Nationaal Park De Hoge Veluwe, measuring approximately 50 square kilometers in area, just five percent of the whole Veluwe. Although the park is relatively small, it blocks the passage of long-distance walkers and game, because it is surrounded by high fences. The fences are needed because De Hoge Veluwe is the only part of the Veluwe with an admission charge. Farther to the east there is a second national park, called the Veluwezoom, also measuring some 50 square kilometers, which is not fenced in and freely accessible. There are plans to turn the entire Veluwe - the largest lowland nature area in Northwestern Europe - into one large national park.

from Wikipedia

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (Marathi: बृहन्मुंबई महानगर पालिका) (formerly the Bombay Municipal Corporation) or the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai is the civic body that governs the city of Mumbai (Bombay). It is India's richest municipal organisation. Established under the Bombay Municipal Corporation Act, 1888, it is responsible for the civic infrastructure and administration of the city and some suburbs of Mumbai. Its motto, यतो धर्मस्ततो जय (Sanskrit: Yato Dharmastato Jaya or, Where there is Righteousness, there shall be Victory) is inscribed on the banner of its Coat of Arms. Built in the Indo Saracenic style of architecture the BMC, as it is more popularly known, is the largest civic organisation in the country, and administers an area of 434 sq km.

 

Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (Marathi: छत्रपती शिवाजी टरमीनस), formerly Victoria Terminus, and better known by its abbreviation CST or Bombay VT) is an historic railway station which serves as the headquarters of the Central Railways. It is one of the busiest railway stations in India[citation needed], and serves Central Railway trains terminating in Mumbai as well as the Mumbai suburban railway.

 

The station was designed by Frederick William Stevens, a consulting architect in 1887-1888, for the princely sum of 16.14 lakh rupees. Stevens earned the commission to construct the station after a masterpiece water colour sketch by draughts man Axel Herman. After earning the commission, Stevens went on a ten-month trip to Europe to make a detailed study of the stations there. The final design bears some resemblance to St. Pancras station in London[citation needed]. It took ten years to complete and was named "Victoria Terminus" in honor of the reigning Queen Victoria.

 

In 1996, the station was renamed by the state government after Chhatrapati Shivaji, a famed 17th century Maratha king.

 

On July 2, 2004 the station was nominated a World Heritage Site by the World Heritage Committee of UNESCO.

  

Uch or Uch Sharif Urdu: اوچ شریف) (Greek: Alexandria En Indo Potamo) is located in 75 km from Bahawalpur in Bahawalpur District, South Punjab, Pakistan Uch is an important historical city, being founded by Alexander the Great. Formerly located at the confluence of the Indus and Chenab rivers, it is now removed to Mithankot, some 100 km from that confluence. It was an important center in medieval India, as an early stronghold of the Delhi Sultanate in the 13th century during the Muslim conquest. Uch Sharif contains the tombs of Bibi Jawindi, Baha'al-Halim and Jalaluddin Bukhari, which are considered master pieces of Islamic architecture and are on the UNESCO World Heritage Site tentative list.

 

It is believed that in 325 BCE Alexander the Great founded a city called Alexandria on the Indus at the site of the last confluence of Punjab rivers with the Indus.[1] Nevertheless, some historians believe that Uch predates the advent of Bikramjit when Jains and Buddhists ruled over the area, and that Mithankot or Chacharan Sharif was the true settlement of Alexandria.[citation needed] In AD 712, Muhammad bin Qasim conquered the city and during the Muslim period Uch was one of the centres of Islamic studies of South Asia. There are several tombs of famous mystics (Sufis) in Uch, notably the tombs of Syed Jalaluddin Bukhari and his family. These structures were joined by a series of domed tombs; the first is said to have been built for Baha’ al-Halim by his pupil, the Suharwardiya Sufi saint Jahaniyan Jahangasht (1307–1383), the second for the latter’s great grant daughter, Bibi Jawindi, in 1494, and the third for the latter’s architect.

 

Flooding in the early 19th century caused serious damage to the tombs, including structural problems and the deterioration of masonry and finishes.[2] As the problems have persisted, the "Uch Monument Complex" was listed in the 1998 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund, and again in 2000 and 2002.[3] The Fund subsequently offered financial assistance for conservation from American Express.[4]

Uch from Wikipedia,

  

Looking down from the John Hancock, Chicago. At one time this was Playboy's HQ in Chicago. Today The Palmolive Building, formerly the Playboy Building, is a 37-story Art Deco building at 919 N. Michigan Avenue in Chicago. Built by Holabird & Root, it was completed in 1929 and was home to the Colgate-Palmolive-Peet corporation.

The Palmolive Building came to be known as the Playboy Building from 1965 to 1989, when it was home to Playboy magazine.[2] During this time, the word P-L-A-Y-B-O-Y was spelled out in 9 feet (2.7 m) illuminated letters.[3] It was designated a Chicago Landmark in 2000,[2] and it was added to the federal National Register of Historic Places in 2003.

Today, the building has been converted for residential use by developer Draper and Kramer. The first two floors house upscale office and retail space. High-end condos make up the rest of the building. Notable residents of the building include Vince Vaughn and Lou Piniella.[citation needed]

This image was taken at a deserted ranch abut an hour outside of Las Vegas, Nevada. The massive light-pollution which is lighting up the sky is perhaps from the spotlight coming out the the top of the Luxor Hotel in Las Vegas.

 

The interior of the bunkhouse was lighted by a number of LED "tea lights." The exterior was lighted by an LED Luxli Viola panel from the right.

 

Please note, the map goes to the Mojave Desert and not to this specific site.

 

The Mojave Desert (/moʊˈhɑːvi, mə-/ mo-HAH-vee)[5][6][7] is an arid rain-shadow desert and the driest desert in North America.[8] It is in the southwestern United States, primarily within southeastern California and southern Nevada, and it occupies 47,877 sq mi (124,000 km2). Very small areas also extend into Utah and Arizona.[9] Its boundaries are generally noted by the presence of Joshua trees, which are native only to the Mojave Desert and are considered an indicator species, and it is believed to support an additional 1,750 to 2,000 species of plants.[10] The central part of the desert is sparsely populated, while its peripheries support large communities such as Las Vegas, San Bernardino, Lancaster, Palmdale, Victorville, and St. George.

 

The Mojave Desert is bordered by the Great Basin Desert to its north[8] and the Sonoran Desert to its south and east.[8] Topographical boundaries include the Tehachapi Mountains to the west, and the San Gabriel Mountains and San Bernardino Mountains to the south. The mountain boundaries are distinct because they are outlined by the two largest faults in California – the San Andreas and Garlock faults. The Mojave Desert displays typical basin and range topography. Higher elevations above 2,000 ft (610 m)) in the Mojave are commonly referred to as the High Desert; however, Death Valley is the lowest elevation in North America at 280 ft (85 m) below sea level and is one of the Mojave Desert's more notorious places. The Mojave Desert occupies less than 50,000 sq mi (130,000 km2), making it the smallest of the North American deserts.[8]

 

The Mojave Desert is often referred to as the "high desert", in contrast to the "low desert", the Sonoran Desert to the south. However, the Mojave Desert is generally lower than the Great Basin Desert to the north.[citation needed] The spelling Mojave originates from the Spanish language while the spelling Mohave comes from modern English. Both are used today, although the Mojave Tribal Nation officially uses the spelling Mojave; the word is a shortened form of Hamakhaave, their endonym in their native language, which means 'beside the water'.[11]

FOR YOU

www.goear.com/listen/168ef1b/vivaldi-verano-monica-huggett

 

I WISH YOU A WONDERFUL STAY ( I will be away 10 days, need a rest)

Love:D

 

A solstice is an astronomical event that happens twice each year when the Sun's apparent position in the sky reaches its northernmost or southernmost extremes. The name is derived from the Latin sol (sun) and sistere (to stand still), because at the solstices, the Sun stands still in declination[citation needed]; that is, the apparent movement of the Sun's path north or south comes to a stop before reversing direction.

The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in the City and Diocese of Washington, commonly known as Washington National Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Episcopal Church located in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States.[1][2] Of Neo-Gothic design closely modeled on English Gothic style of the late fourteenth century, it is the sixth-largest cathedral in the world,[citation needed] the second-largest in the United States,[3] and the highest as well as the fourth-tallest structure in Washington, D.C.

Shadows of the Sun is the seventh studio album by the Norwegian experimental band Ulver, released on October 1, 2007 in Europe and on October 2 in the United States.The title was announced on July 13, 2007 and the album was described as "low-key, dark and tragic". Shadows of the Sun received generally positive reviews by critics. In February 2008 Ulver won the Oslo Awards for album of the year 2007 with Shadows of the Sun.[citation needed] The album was also voted best album of 2007 at the website Sonic Frontiers.

 

Camera: Canon EOS 50D

Exposure: 0.002 sec (1/640)

Aperture: f/13.0

Focal Length: 78 mm

ISO Speed: 200

Exposure Bias: -2 EV

Flash: Off

 

NO edit

 

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© All rights reserved.

Flowers yield abundant nectar from which bees make a high-quality honey. Monofloral honey is produced primarily around the Mediterranean, and is marketed worldwide as a premium product. Flowers can be candied and are sometimes used as cake decorations. Lavender flavors baked goods and desserts (it pairs especially well with chocolate), and is also used to make "lavender sugar".[11] Lavender flowers are occasionally blended with black, green, or herbal tea, adding a fresh, relaxing scent and flavor.

 

Though it has many other traditional uses in southern France, lavender is not used in traditional southern French cooking. It does not appear at all in the best-known compendium of Provençal cooking, J.-B. Reboul's Cuisinière Provençale [12] In the 1970s, a herb blend called herbes de Provence usually including lavender was invented by spice wholesalers,[13] and lavender has more recently become popular in cookery.

 

Lavender lends a floral and slightly sweet flavor to most dishes, and is sometimes paired with sheep's-milk and goat's-milk cheeses. For most cooking applications the dried buds (also referred to as flowers) are used, though some chefs experiment with the leaves as well. Only the buds contain the essential oil of lavender, from which the scent and flavor of lavender are best derived.

 

In the United States, both lavender syrup and dried lavender buds are used to make lavender scones and marshmallows.

 

Lavender is used extensively with herbs and aromatherapy. English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) yields an essential oil with sweet overtones, and can be used in balms, salves, perfumes, cosmetics, and topical applications. Lavandin, Lavandula × intermedia (also known as Dutch lavender), yields a similar essential oil, but with higher levels of terpenes including camphor, which add a sharper overtone to the fragrance. Mexican lavender, Lavandula stoechas, is not used medicinally, but mainly for landscaping.

 

Essential oil of lavender has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties.[citation needed] It was used in hospitals during World War I to disinfect floors and walls. These extracts are also used as fragrances for bath products.

 

According to folk wisdom, lavender has many uses. Infusions of lavender are believed to soothe insect bites, burns, and headaches. Bunches of lavender repel insects.[citation needed] In pillows, lavender seeds and flowers aid sleep and relaxation.[citation needed] An infusion of flowerheads added to a cup of boiling water soothes and relaxes at bedtime. Lavender oil (or extract of Lavender) heals acne when used diluted 1:10 with water, rosewater, or witch hazel; it also treats skin burns and inflammatory conditions.[citation needed]

 

A recent clinical study investigated anxiolytic effects and influence on sleep quality. Lavender oil with a high percentage of linalool and linalyl acetate, in the form of capsules, was generally well tolerated. It showed meaningful efficacy in alleviating anxiety and related sleep disturbances.[14]

source wikipedia

Million Dollar Staircase

The New York State Capitol is the capitol building of the U.S. state of New York. Housing the New York State Legislature, it is located in the state capital city Albany as part of the Empire State Plaza on State Street in Capitol Park. The building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million (worth approximately half a billion current dollars), was the most expensive government building of its time.[citation needed] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, then included as a contributing property when the Lafayette Park Historic District was listed in 1978. The following year it was declared a National Historic Landmark

The flowers and leaves are used as an herbal medicine,[14] either in the form of lavender oil or as an herbal tea. The flowers are also used as a culinary herb, most often as part of the French herb blend called herbes de Provence.

 

Lavender essential oil, when diluted with a carrier oil, is commonly used as a relaxant with massage therapy. Products for home use, such as lotions, eye pillows (including lavender flowers or the essential oil itself) and bath oils, etc., are also used. Both the petals and the oil are the most popular ingredients in handmade soap.

 

Dried lavender flowers and lavender essential oil are also used as a prevention against clothing moths, which do not like their scent.[citation needed]

 

Lavandula angustifolia is included in the Tasmanian Fire Service's list of low flammability plants, indicating that it is suitable for growing within a building protection zone.

 

Le plateau de Valensole vit essentiellement de l'agriculture, du tourisme et de l'artisanat. Il est célèbre pour ses cultures de lavandin et de truffes. 81 400 ha du plateau sont cultivés. Anciennement au XIXe siècle, le plateau était cultivé essentiellement de champs d'amandiers et de chênes truffiers. Cette économie a disparu et fut remplacée par la culture de la lavande et de céréales. Le plateau est appelé le "grenier de la région".

 

L'amandier

 

Arbre roi du plateau, l'amandier occasionna de grands profits, surtout au XIXe siècle. Il est installé en Provence depuis l'Antiquité. Annonciatrices du printemps, ses fleurs sont écloses avant la fin de l'hiver. C'était autrefois, sur les plateaux de Valensole et de Forcalquier, un arbre très répandu dont les fruits broyés donnaient de l'huile ou de la pâte. L'amande princesse, la plus fine, était très recherchée dans la pâtisserie et la confiserie pour la fabrication des calissons et du nougat. Mais sa fragilité lui fait aujourd'hui préférer des variétés plus robustes.

 

Le lavandin

 

Le lavandin est la culture la plus fameuse du plateau. Pourtant en voie de disparition depuis 30 ans par la concurrence étrangère, elle est utilisée pour la fabrication du savon de Marseille, utilisée par les apiculteurs locaux lors de la floraison (juin-juillet) pour extraire le fameux miel de lavande, distillée pour du parfum ou des senteurs et anciennement pour ses vertus médicinales.

Les lieux furent de tous temps occupés, les sites préhistoriques et antiques en témoignent. Des grottes archéologiques tels que la Baume Bonne dans les basses Gorges du Verdon ont un patrimoine historique richissime. La ville de Riez au cœur du plateau était une riche cité romaine, appelée Forum Reii. Deux voies romaines traversaient le plateau. La ville de Riez s'est développée à leur carrefour et devint la capitale économique. Quatre colonnes, vestiges d'un temple disparu, veillent dans un pré à la sortie de la ville actuelle. Mais la civilisation gallo-romaine a laissé son empreinte sur tout le plateau : thermes de Gréoux-les-Bains, borne militaire de Saint-Martin-de-Brômes, etc.) et jusque dans les noms de lieux (Montagnac-Montpezat, Quinson, Roumoules...).

 

On nomme le plateau Planas de Valençòla en provençal de norme classique et Plano de Valençolo selon la norme mistralienne source wikipédia

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The active Erta Ale Volcano in the Danakil Depression near the end of sunrise.

  

From Wikipedia: "Erta Ale (or Ertale or Irta'ale) is a continuously active basaltic shield volcano in the Afar Region of northeastern Ethiopia. It is situated in the Afar Depression, a badland desert area spanning the border with Eritrea. Erta Ale is the most active volcano in Ethiopia.

  

Erta Ale is 613 metres (2,011 ft) high, with one or sometimes two active lava lakes at the summit which occasionally overflow on the south side of the volcano.[1] It is notable for holding the longest-existing lava lake, present since the early years of the twentieth century (1906). Volcanoes with lava lakes are very rare: there are only six in the world.

Erta Ale means "smoking mountain" in the local Afar language and its southernmost pit is known locally as "the gateway to Hell". In 2009, it was mapped by a team from the BBC using three-dimensional laser techniques, in order for the mapping team to maintain a distance and avoid the lakes' searingly hot temperatures.

  

Erta Ale is centered over the east African rift system, which is a triple junction setting whose movements are resulting in the formation of a pull apart basin or rift. The volcano comprises mainly Mafic material which has been brought up to the surface caused by unroofing of the mantle due to this rift formation.[citation needed]

Not much is known about Erta Ale, as the surrounding terrain is some of the most inhospitable on Earth and the native Afar people have a legendary reputation for viciousness towards outsiders; one travel guide recommends hiring "one or maybe two armed guards or police" to visit Erta Ale."

Lake Norman

 

Lake Norman, created between 1959 and 1964[1] as part of the construction of the Cowans Ford Dam by Duke Energy, is the largest man-made body of fresh water in North Carolina.

 

Geography

 

Lake Norman is fed by the Catawba River, and drains into Mountain Island Lake to the south. It was named after former Duke Power president Norman Atwater Cocke. Lake Norman is sometimes referred to as the "inland sea" of North Carolina; it offers 520 miles (840 km) of shoreline and a surface area of more than 50 square miles (130 km2). Full pond at Lake Norman is 760 feet (230 m) above mean sea level. Interstate 77 and North Carolina Highway 150 cross Lake Norman at different points.[citation needed]

 

Hydroelectrical power

 

Lake Norman provides electricity to the Piedmont region of the Carolinas. It powers the generators at the hydroelectric station at Cowans Ford Dam, is used by the coal-fired Marshall Steam Station, and by McGuire Nuclear Station to cool the reactors whilst generating the steam that drives their turbines. The lake supplies water to Lincoln County, Catawba County, Iredell County, Mooresville, Charlotte, and other towns in Mecklenburg County, particularly Cornelius, Davidson and Huntersville.[citation needed]

 

Natural history

Climate

 

Lake Norman, as with most of the rest of North Carolina, has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa in the Koppen Climate Classification), featuring warm-to-hot summers and cold-to-mild winters. There is no “dry season” and rainfall is highly variable year-round. Lake Norman gets a mean annual precipitation of about 43.1 inches per year over an average of 75 precipitation days, with approximately 41.1 of those inches being comprised by rain and the other 2 inches being comprised by snow. Wind speeds are, on average, highest in February, while they are at their lowest in August.

 

Lake Norman borders four counties in North Carolina (Catawba, Iredell, Mecklenburg, and Lincoln) and is present in both the Southern Piedmont and Central Piedmont climate divisions. July is normally the warmest month in these two climate divisions, with an average daily maximum temperature of 90 °F (32.2 °C) and an average daily minimum of 70 °F (21.1 °C). January is normally the coolest month, with an average daily maximum of 51 °F (10.6 °C) and an average daily minimum of 29 °F (–1.7 °C). The all-time maximum of 107 °F (41.7 °C) was recorded in 1954, while the all-time minimum of -5 °F (–20.6 °C) was recorded in 1985.[2]

 

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Norman

I have to thank Fat Burns ( www.flickr.com/photos/67627528@N04/)

He was in a way inspirational :-)

 

The generic name means "Phalaen[a]-like" and is probably a reference to the genus Phalaena, the name given by Carl Linnaeus to a group of large moths; the flowers of some species supposedly resemble moths in flight.[2] For this reason, the species are sometimes called Moth orchids.

They are native throughout southeast Asia from the Himalayan mountains to the islands of Polillo, Palawan and Zamboanga del Norte in the island of Mindanao in the Philippines and northern Australia. Orchid Island of Taiwan is named after this genus. Little recent information about their habitat and their ecology in nature is available since little field research has been done in the last decades.

Most are epiphytic shade plants; a few are lithophytes[citation needed]. In the wild, some species grow below the canopies of moist and humid lowland forests, protected against direct sunlight; others grow in seasonally dry or cool environments. The species have adapted individually to these three habitats.

Possessing neither pseudobulbs nor rhizome, Phalaenopsis shows a monopodial growth habit: a single growing stem produces one or two alternate, thick, fleshy, elliptical leaves a year from the top while the older, basal leaves drop off at the same rate. If very healthy, a Phalaenopsis plant can have up to ten or more leaves. The inflorescence, either a raceme or panicle, appears from the stem between the leaves. They bloom in their full glory for several weeks. If kept in the home, the flowers may last two to three months[citation needed].

Some Phalaenopsis species in Malaysia are known to use subtle weather cues to coordinate mass flowering[citation needed].

Wlkipedia

 

Textures: one by FrenchKiss textures,another one of unknown source and mine

 

View On Black and in Large

 

Tanah Lot means "Land in the Middle of the sea" in Balinese language[citation needed]. Located in Tabanan, about 20 km from Denpasar, the temple sits on a large offshore rock which has been shaped continuously over the years by the ocean tide.

 

Tanah Lot is claimed to be the work of the 15th century priest Nirartha. During his travels along the south coast he saw the rock-island's beautiful setting and rested there. Some fishermen saw him, and bought him gifts. Nirartha then spent the night on the little island. Later he spoke to the fishermen and told them to build a shrine on the rock for he felt it to be a holy place to worship the Balinese sea gods.

 

The Tanah Lot temple was built and has been a part of Balinese mythology for centuries. The temple is one of seven sea temples around the Balinese coast. Each of the sea temples were established within eyesight of the next to form a chain along the south-western coast.

 

At the base of the rocky island, poisonous sea snakes are believed to guard the temple from evil spirits and intruders. As well as one giant snake which also protects the temple, which was created from Nirartha’s scarf when he established the island.

 

Camera: Nikon D90

Exposure: 20

Aperture: f/22.0

Focal Length: 10 mm

Exposure: 0.00

ISO Speed: 200

Exposure Bias: 0 EV

Flash: No Flash

These are the feathers of a Blue Jay. Unfortunately, I found the bird dead near the edge of my pond this morning. Judging from my comings and goings this morning, it must have died there within the hour of shooting this as I had not noticed it earlier today. These are common yet gorgeous birds with a bit of a temper. I have no idea what could have caused its death, as it showed no sign of trauma.

 

So it made me feel a bit like a scavenger but I couldn't resist getting shots of these beautiful feathers while still fresh. I hope you can view it as a gift from the Blue Jay before it goes away forever.

 

An interesting quote from Wikipedia about the Blue Jay coloration:

 

"As with other blue-hued birds, the Blue Jay's coloration is not derived from pigments but is the result of light interference due to the internal structure of the feathers;[citation needed] if a blue feather is crushed, the blue disappears as the structure is destroyed.[citation needed] This is referred to as structural coloration.".

Million Dollar Staircase

The New York State Capitol is the capitol building of the U.S. state of New York. Housing the New York State Legislature, it is located in the state capital city Albany as part of the Empire State Plaza on State Street in Capitol Park. The building, completed in 1899 at a cost of $25 million (worth approximately half a billion current dollars), was the most expensive government building of its time.[citation needed] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971, then included as a contributing property when the Lafayette Park Historic District was listed in 1978. The following year it was declared a National Historic Landmark

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The Severn Valley Railway is a heritage railway in Shropshire and Worcestershire, England. The 16-mile (26 km) heritage line runs along the Severn Valley from Bridgnorth to Kidderminster, crossing the Shropshire/Worcestershire border, following the course of the River Severn for much of its route. Train services are hauled predominantly by steam locomotives; however diesel traction is also sometimes used on designated days and during periods of high fire risk.

The railway is one of the most popular heritage railways in the country as well as being the sixth-longest standard gauge heritage line in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] It hosts numerous special events throughout the year, including both steam and diesel galas.

HDR photograph of the cloisters at Norwich's Anglican Cathedral Church, UK by Timothy Selvage.

 

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Cloisters at Norwich Cathedral, UK. Thanks to HDR and a bit of jiggery pokery I managed to retain some information from within the courtyard and the cloisters opposite, as well as both archways. The on on the right was actually in deep shadow and the one on the left was glowing bright orange. It didn't even look 'real' so saturation was decreased.

 

Norwich has two Cathedrals, the Roman Catholic Cathedral, (St. John the baptist - picture of this coming soon) and this one which is Church of England.

 

Norwich Cathedral has the second largest cloisters, only outsized by Salisbury Cathedral. The cathedral close is the largest in England and one of the largest in Europe and has more people living within it than any other close.

 

The cathedral was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream-coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings. The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower still seen today topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric.

 

The large cloister has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones. The cathedral is on the lowest part of the Norwich river plain with Mousehold Heath, an area of scrubland, to the north.[citation needed]

 

The cathedral spire, measuring at 315 ft or 96 m, is the second tallest in England despite being partly rebuilt after being struck by lightning in 1169, just 23 months after its completion, which led to the building being set on fire. Measuring 461 ft or 140.5 m long and, with the transepts, 177 ft or 54 m wide at completion, Norwich Cathedral was the largest building in East Anglia. see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwich_Cathedral

~ Kevin Bacon ~

 

This Gorilla was a swinging dude on his gym set at the Ft. Worth Zoo ~

 

 

Kevin Bacon

 

Wikipedia~

 

Kevin Norwood Bacon (born July 8, 1958) is an American film and theater actor whose notable roles include Footloose, Flatliners, A Few Good Men, Apollo 13, Mystic River, The Woodsman, Friday the 13th and Tremors.

 

Bacon, the youngest of six children, was born and raised in a close-knit family in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A former Park Avenue debutante[citation needed], his mother, Ruth Hilda (née Holmes; 1916–1991), taught elementary school and was a liberal activist, while his father, Edmund Bacon, was a well-respected architect. At 16, Bacon attended the Pennsylvania Governors School for the Arts, an invaluable state-funded 5 week arts program which helped solidify Bacon's passion for the arts. From there, Bacon left home at age 17 to pursue a theater career in New York, where he was one of the youngest students ever admitted, and the youngest student to appear in a production at the Circle in the Square Theater School. "I wanted life, man, the real thing", he later recalled to Nancy Mills of Cosmopolitan. "The message I got was 'The arts are it. Business is the devil's work. Art and creative expression are next to godliness.' Combine that with an immense ego and you wind up with an actor."

 

Bacon's decision to become an actor did not come without pressures. Describing his father to Mills as a "city-planning superstar", he set very high goals for himself because he "felt nothing less than stardom would be enough." However, his movie debut in the fraternity comedy Animal House in 1978 did not lead to the instant fame for which he had hoped, and Bacon returned to waiting tables and auditioning for small roles in theater. He did a couple of stints on television soap operas Search For Tomorrow (1979) and The Guiding Light (1980–81) in New York while waiting for larger roles to come along. He refused an offer of a television series based on Animal House to be filmed in California in order to remain close to the New York stage. Some of his early stage work included Getting Out performed at New York's Phoenix Theater, and Flux which he did at Second Stage Theatre during their 1981–1982 season.

 

His motivation to remain in New York still has resonance for Bacon. "I think my decision had a lot to do with just being afraid" he explained to Chase in Cosmopolitan. "L.A. scared me. I call it the city of fear. I get scared when I land, and I live in fear there, and I think a lot of people do. I mean, I've had a hard time in New York City too, but aesthetically and spiritually, I'm an East Coast person." With the support of his wife, actress Kyra Sedgwick, Bacon believes that he has come to terms with his qualms about Los Angeles, thus strengthening his commitment to acting. "Our lives are still crazy, we still spend a ton of time out [in L.A.], and I've finally admitted that the movie business means a lot to me", he told Chase. "I used to say, it's okay, I can do it, but it isn't that important, and then I realized I was out of my mind; this is what I do for a living."

 

In 1995 Bacon formed a band called The Bacon Brothers with his brother, Michael. The duo has released six albums.

HDR photograph of the cloisters at Norwich's Anglican Cathedral Church, UK by Timothy Selvage.

 

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Evening sun approaches and casts shadows through the cloisters at Norwich Cathedral, UK.

 

Norwich Cathedral has the second largest cloisters, only outsized by Salisbury Cathedral. The cathedral close is the largest in England and one of the largest in Europe and has more people living within it than any other close.

 

The cathedral was begun in 1096 and constructed out of flint and mortar and faced with a cream-coloured Caen limestone. A Saxon settlement and two churches were demolished to make room for the buildings. The cathedral was completed in 1145 with the Norman tower still seen today topped with a wooden spire covered with lead. Several episodes of damage necessitated rebuilding of the east end and spire but since the final erection of the stone spire in 1480 there have been few fundamental alterations to the fabric.

 

The large cloister has over 1,000 bosses including several hundred carved and ornately painted ones. The cathedral is on the lowest part of the Norwich river plain with Mousehold Heath, an area of scrubland, to the north.[citation needed]

 

The cathedral spire, measuring at 315 ft or 96 m, is the second tallest in England despite being partly rebuilt after being struck by lightning in 1169, just 23 months after its completion, which led to the building being set on fire. Measuring 461 ft or 140.5 m long and, with the transepts, 177 ft or 54 m wide at completion, Norwich Cathedral was the largest building in East Anglia. see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwich_Cathedral

Peyto Lake (pea-toe) is a glacier-fed lake located in Banff National Park in the Canadian Rockies. It was named for Bill Peyto, an early trail guide and trapper in the Banff area.[1]

 

The lake is formed in a valley of the Waputik Range, between Caldron Peak, Peyto Peak and Mount Jimmy Simpson, at an elevation of 1,860 m (6,100 ft).[citation needed]

 

During the summer, significant amounts of glacial rock flour flow into the lake, and these suspended rock particles give the lake a bright, turquoise colour. Because of its bright colour, photos of the lake often appear in illustrated books, and area around the lake is a popular sightseeing spot for tourists in the park. The lake is best seen from Bow Summit.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Buddha in parinirvana, Gandhara art, 2nd or 3rd century

Reclining Buddha of Galvihara at Polonnaruwa (Sri Lanka, 12th century)

 

A reclining Buddha is a statue that represents Buddha lying down and is a major iconographic and statuary pattern of Buddhism. It represents the historical Buddha during his last illness, about to enter the parinirvana[citation needed]. He is lying on the right flank, his head resting on a cushion or relying on his right elbow, supporting his head with his hand.

 

This pattern seems to have emerged at the same time as other representations of the Buddha in the Greco-Buddhist art of Gandhara.

In Serbian, the town is known as Kladovo (Кладово), in Romanian Cladova, in German as Kladowo or Kladovo and in Latin and Romanised Greek as Zanes. In the time of the Roman Empire, the name of the town was Zanes while the fortifications was known as Diana and Pontes (from Greek "sea" -pontos, or Roman "bridge" - pontem). Emperor Trajan had a number of fortications constructed in the area during the Roman times, such as the well-known Trajan's Bridge (Pontes was built on the Serbian side, Theodora was built on the Romanian side). Later, Slavs founded a settlement that was named Novi Grad (Нови Град)[citation needed], while Ottomans built a fortress here and called it Fethülislam. The present-day name of Kladovo is first recorded in 1596 in an Austrian military document. ( Wikipedia ).

Kuwait City (Arabic: مدينة الكويت, transliteration: Madīnat al-Kuwayt), is the capital and largest city of Kuwait. It has an estimated population of 63,600 (2006 estimate) [citation needed] within city limits and 2.38 million in the metropolitan area. Located at the heart of the country on the shore of the Persian Gulf, and containing Kuwait's parliament (Majlis Al-Umma), most governmental offices, the headquarters of most Kuwaiti corporations and banks, it is the indisputable political, cultural and economic center of the emirate.

Kuwait City’s trade and transportation needs are served by Kuwait International Airport, Mina Al-Shuwaik (Shuwaik Port) and Mina al-Ahmadi (Ahmadi Port) 50 kilometers to the south, on the Persian Gulf coast.

 

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Camera: Nikon D700

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ISO: 200

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The Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the United States in the state of Arizona. It is largely contained within the Grand Canyon National Park, one of the first national parks in the United States. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of the Grand Canyon area, and visited it on numerous occasions to hunt and enjoy the scenery.

The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,000 feet / 1,800 metres) The Canyon could hold all the river water on earth and still be only half full.[citation needed] Nearly two billion years of the Earth's geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to the point we see it at today.

   

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Crater Lake is located in Klamath County, approximately 60 miles (97 km) northwest of the county seat of Klamath Falls, and about 80 miles (130 km) northeast of the city of Medford.[9]

 

The lake is 5 by 6 miles (8 by 10 km) across with an average depth of 1,148 feet (350 m). Its maximum depth has been measured at 1,949 feet (594 m),[1][10] which fluctuates slightly as the weather changes.[1] This makes Crater Lake the deepest lake that is completely in the United States, the second deepest lake in North America, and the ninth deepest lake in the world (Lake Baikal is the deepest). Crater Lake is often cited as the seventh deepest lake in the world, but this ranking excludes Lake Vostok, which is situated under nearly 13,000 feet (4,000 m) of Antarctic ice, and the recent soundings of San Martín Lake, which is located on the border of Chile and Argentina.

 

However, on the basis of comparing average depths among the world's deepest lakes, Crater Lake becomes the deepest lake in the Western Hemisphere and the third deepest in the world.[11] Comparing average depths among the world's lakes whose basins are entirely above sea level, Crater Lake is the deepest.[citation needed]

 

The caldera rim of Crater Lake ranges in elevation from 7,000 to 8,000 feet (2,100 to 2,400 m).

(Wikipedia)

 

As you can see, there is still plenty of snow up there and most of the lake was inacessable

The Hohenzollern Bridge (German: Hohenzollernbrücke) is a bridge crossing the river Rhine in the German city of Cologne (German Köln). It crosses the Rhine at kilometre 688.5. Originally, the bridge was both a railway and street bridge, however, after its destruction in 1945 and its subsequent reconstruction, it was only accessible to rail and pedestrian traffic.

 

It is the most heavily used railway bridge in Germany with more than 1200 trains daily[citation needed], connecting the Köln Hauptbahnhof and Köln Messe/Deutz stations.

I expected it to be a fresh experience in search of the perfect shot, but the warmth of the heat, the huge beetles or anything like that, the mosquitoes and the snakes just made it indescribable: D Still, I saw stones through the lens.

  

A little story of the place

 

Pobiti Kamani (Bulgarian: Побити камъни), also known as The Stone Desert, is a desert-like rock phenomenon located on the north west Varna Province border in Bulgaria. It is considered the only desert in Bulgaria and one of few found in Europe.[citation needed] The desert consists of sand dunes and several groups of natural rock formations on a total area of 13 km². The formations are mainly stone columns between 5 and 7 meters high and from 0.3 to 3 meters thick. The columns do not have solid foundations, but are instead hollow and filled with sand, and look as if they were stuck into the surrounding sand, which gives the phenomenon its name. Sandstorms and sand twisters have also been known to commonly occur in this desert region of Bulgaria. The Stone Desert is not only a well known European tourist attraction due to its desert like habitat, but it is one of few places where desert type vegetation such as cactus are known to grow. It is also the only desert in Europe in which desert reptilians and other desert type animalia are found to thrive. The Stone Desert along with the Tabernas Desert of Spain is one of two naturally formed deserts in all of Europe[citation needed] and the only known naturally formed desert in Eastern Europe.[citation needed]

 

In order to be preserved, Pobiti Kamani (The Stone Desert) was designated a natural landmark in the late 1930s. There are a number of theories regarding the phenomenon's origin. The pioneering hypothesis can be divided roughly into two groups: suggesting an organic or abiotic origin. According to the former, the formations are the result of coral activity (but detail investigation shows no coral), while the latter explain the phenomenon with the prismatic weathering and desertification of the rocks, the formation of sand and limestone concretions, or lower Eocene bubbling reefs.

 

Based on a petrographic and stable isotope geochemical study and field observations, evidence exists that these structures represent an exceptionally record of paleo-hydrocarbon seep system (low magnesium calcite cements are strongly depleted in heavy carbon isotope 13C). The pathways of fluid circulation are recorded as columns set in sands, which columns after recent sand removal gave desert-like landscape. The dynamic reconstruction of the origin of these structures, the processes of fluid migration and microbial mediation of hydrocarbon oxidation leading to carbonate precipitation have been studied by De Boever et al. (2009).

 

An éclair is a long thin pastry made with choux dough filled with a cream and topped with icing.

The dough, which is the same as that used for profiterole, is piped into an oblong shape with a pastry bag and baked until it is crisp and hollow inside. Once cool, the pastry then is filled with a coffee- or chocolate-flavoured[1] pastry cream (crème pâtissière), custard or whipped cream, and topped with fondant icing.[2] Other fillings include pistachio- and rum-flavoured custard, fruit-flavoured fillings, or chestnut purée.

The eclair probably originated in France during the nineteenth century. It is a popular type of cake served all over the world. The word is first attested both in English and in French in the 1860s.[3][4] Some food historians speculate that éclairs were first made by Antonin Carême (1784-1833), the famous French chef.[citation needed] The first known English-language recipe for éclairs appears in the Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, published in 1884.

Éclair is French for "lightning," though the connection is obscure.

(c)Wikipedia

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The blue hour (from the French expression l'heure bleue[citation needed]) is the period of twilight each morning and evening where there is neither full daylight nor complete darkness. The time is considered special because of the quality of the light.

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_hour

 

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The Severn Valley Railway is a heritage railway in Shropshire and Worcestershire, England. The 16-mile (26 km) heritage line runs along the Severn Valley from Bridgnorth to Kidderminster, crossing the Shropshire/Worcestershire border, following the course of the River Severn for much of its route. Train services are hauled predominantly by steam locomotives; however diesel traction is also sometimes used on designated days and during periods of high fire risk.

The railway is one of the most popular heritage railways in the country as well as being the sixth-longest standard gauge heritage line in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] It hosts numerous special events throughout the year, including both steam and diesel galas.

Dunure Castle is located on the west coast of Scotland, in South Ayrshire, about 5 miles south of Ayr. Dunure Castle today stands in ruins on a rocky promontory. The site is believed to date from the late 13th century, however the remains of the building are of 15th and 16th century origin[citation needed].

 

The castle is the point of origin of the Kennedys of Carrick, who once ruled over much of south western Scotland and were granted the lands in 1357[citation needed]. This family though should not be confused with the famous American Kennedy family which came from Co. Wexford in Ireland.

 

In August 1563, Mary, Queen of Scots visited the castle during her third progress round the west of the country].

 

In 1570, a dispute arose between Gilbert Kennedy, 4th Earl of Cassilis, and Alan Stewart, the lay Commendator to the Crossraguel Abbey over the ownership of some of the abbey lands. Gilbert kidnapped the Commendator and locked him in Dunure Castle. The Commendator was then tortured by being roasted alive on a spit over a fire. As a result of the torture, the lands were signed over to Gilbert. The Commendator was rescued from his confinement by the Laird of Bargany who arrived with a body of men and finally settled the ownership of the abbey lands (Wikipedia).

 

Olive tree. Almeirim, Portugal

.......................................................................................................................................................................

 

The olive tree, Olea europaea, is very hardy: drought-, disease- and fire-resistant, it can live to a great age. Its root system is robust and capable of regenerating the tree even if the above-ground structure is destroyed. The older an olive tree is, the broader and more gnarled its trunk appears. Many olive trees in the groves around the Mediterranean are said to be hundreds of years old, while an age of 2,000 years is claimed for a number of individual trees; in some cases, this has been scientifically verified.

Pliny the Elder told about a sacred Greek olive tree that was 1,600 years old. An olive tree in west Athens, named "Plato's Olive Tree", was said[by whom?] to be a remnant of the grove within which Plato's Academy was situated, which would make it approximately 2,400 years old. The tree comprised a cavernous trunk from which a few branches were still sprouting in 1975, when a traffic accident caused a bus to fall on and uproot it. Since then, the trunk has been preserved and displayed in the nearby Agricultural University of Athens. A supposedly older tree, the "Peisistratos Tree", is located by the banks of the Cephisus[disambiguation needed ] River, in the municipality of Agioi Anargyroi, and is said to be a remnant of an olive grove that was planted by Athenian tyrant Peisistratos in the 6th century BC. Numerous ancient olive trees also exist near Pelion in Greece.

An olive tree in Algarve, Portugal, is 2000 years old, according to radiocarbon dating.

The age of an olive tree in Crete, claimed to be over 2,000 years old, has been confirmed on the basis of tree ring analysis.

An olive tree in Bar, Montenegro, is claimed to be over 2,000 years old.

An olive tree on the island of Brijuni (Brioni), Istria in Croatia, has been calculated to be about 1,600 years old. It still gives fruit (about 30 kg/66 lb per year), which is made into top quality olive oil.

The town of Bshaale, Lebanon claims to have the oldest olive trees in the world (4000 BC for the oldest), but no scientific study supports these claims. Other trees in the towns of Amioun appear to be at least 1,500 years old.

According to a recent scientific survey, there are dozens of ancient olive trees throughout Israel and Biblical Palestine, 1,600–2,000 years old. Ancient trees include two giant olive trees in the Arab town of Arraba and five trees in Deir Hanna, both in the Galilee region, which have been determined to be over 3,000 years old, although the credibility of the study that produced these dates has been questioned.[citation needed] All seven trees continue to produce olives.

 

Several trees in the Garden of Gethsemane (from the Hebrew words "gat shemanim" or olive press) in Jerusalem are claimed to date back to the time of Jesus.

 

The Bedouin (/ˈbɛdʉ.ɪn/, also Bedouins; from the Arabic badw بَدْو or badawiyyīn/badawiyyūn/"Al Buainain بَدَوِيُّون, plurals of badawī بَدَوِي) are an Arab ethnocultural are a group, descended from nomads who have historically inhabited the Arabian and Syrian Deserts. The Bedouins are a seminomadic group of people. Their name means desert dwellers in Arabic.[30] Their territory stretches from the vast deserts of North Africa to the rocky sands of the Middle East.[30] They are traditionally divided into tribes, or clans (known in Arabic as ʿashāʾir; عَشَائِر) and share a common culture of herding camels and goats.[30]

The Bedouin form a part of[citation needed], but are not synonymous with[citation needed], the modern concept of the Arabs. Bedouins have been referred to by various names throughout history, including Qedarites in the Old Testament and "Araba'a" by the Assyrians (ar-ba-a-a being a nisba of the noun Arab, a name still used for Bedouins today).

While many Bedouins have abandoned their nomadic and tribal traditions for modern urban lifestyle, they retain traditional Bedouin culture with concepts of belonging to ʿašāʾir, traditional music, poetry, dances (like Saas), and many other cultural practices. Urbanised Bedouins also organise cultural festivals, usually held several times a year, in which they gather with other Bedouins to partake in, and learn about, various Bedouin traditions - from poetry recitation and traditional sword dances, to classes teaching traditional tent knitting and playing traditional Bedouin musical instruments. Traditions like camel riding and camping in the deserts are also popular leisure activities for urbanised Bedouins who live within close proximity to deserts or other wilderness areas.

 

source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedouin

The botanical garden is located at 4101 Sherbrooke Street East, at the corner of Pie-IX and Sherbrooke Streets, in Maisonneuve Park, facing Montreal's Olympic Stadium. It contains a greenhouse complex full of plants from around the world, and a number of large outdoor gardens, each with a specific theme. The outdoor gardens are bare and covered with snow from about November until about April, but the greenhouses are open to visitors year round, hosting the annual Butterflies Go Free exhibit from February to April.

The garden was founded in 1931, in the height of the Great Depression, by mayor Camillien Houde, after years of campaigning by Brother Marie-Victorin. The grounds were designed by Henry Teuscher, while the Art Deco style administration building was designed by architect Lucien F. Kéroack.

It serves to educate the public in general and students of horticulture in particular, as well as to conserve endangered plant species. The grounds are also home to a botanical research institution, to the Société d'astronomie de Montréal,and to the Montreal Insectarium; offsite, the Garden staff also administer the Ferme Angrignon educational farm and petting zoo.

While it charges admission, city residents can obtain a pass granting free admission to the outdoor gardens, so many people visit regularly, even if only to sit under the trees. The outdoor areas are also free to everyone between 6 pm and nightfall during the summer season (May to September). Many weddings are performed in the gardens every year.[citation needed] The nearest metro station is Pie-IX, which is located on the corner of the Olympic Stadium.

www.gettyimages.se/detail/foto/fotografiska-in-stockholm-...

 

fotografiska.eu/

 

Fotografiska (The Swedish Museum of Photography) opened to the public on 21 May 2010. It is a centre for contemporary photography located in Stockholm, Sweden.

 

Fotografiska is housed at Stadsgården, in a former industrial Art Nouveau style[citation needed] building dating from 1906. Designed by Ferdinand Boberg, the building was used as a customs house, and is listed as a building of cultural interest. The original brick facade of building is intact, while the interiors have been renovated to house the museum. The city of Stockholm has funded the 250 million Swedish crowns restoration costs. In addition to the exhibition spaces, of 5 500 square meters, Fotografiska houses an academy, bistro, cafe, bar, conference rooms, museum shop, gallery, and event spaces.

The Cathedral Basilica of Our Lady of Amiens (French: Basilique Cathédrale Notre-Dame d'Amiens), or simply Amiens Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic church. The cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of Amiens (currently Jean-Luc Bouilleret). It is situated on a slight ridge overlooking the River Somme in Amiens, the administrative capital of the Picardy region of France, some 120 kilometres (75 miles) north of Paris. It is the 19th largest church in the world.[citation needed]

 

Medieval cathedral builders were trying to maximize the internal dimensions in order to reach for the heavens and bring in more light. In that regard, the Amiens cathedral is the tallest complete cathedral in France, its stone-vaulted nave reaching an internal height of 42.30 metres (138.8 ft) (surpassed only by the incomplete Beauvais Cathedral). It also has the greatest interior volume of any French cathedral, estimated at 200,000 cubic metres (260,000 cu yd). The cathedral was built between 1220 and c.1270 and has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1981.[5] Although it has lost most of its original stained glass, Amiens Cathedral is renowned for the quality and quantity of early 13th-century Gothic sculpture in the main west façade and the south transept portal, and a large quantity of polychrome sculpture from later periods inside the building.

My Frangipani - Thursday Flower.

 

السلام عليكم ورحمة الله وبركاته

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Plumeria (common name Frangipani) is a genus of flowering plants of the family which includes Dogbane: the Apocynaceae.[1] It contains 7-8 species of mainly deciduous shrubs and small trees. They are native to Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America as far south as Brazil but have been spread throughout the world's tropics.[citation needed]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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This is the Bridge of Sighs in St John College Cambridge, It was built in 1831 and crosses the River Cam between the college's Third Court and New Court. The architect was Henry Hutchinson.

 

It is named after the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, although they have little architecturally in common beyond the fact that they are both covered. The bridge is one of Cambridge's main tourist attractions and Queen Victoria is said to have loved it more than any other spot in the city.

 

On two separate occasions, students have pulled the prank of dangling a car under the bridge. In the first incident (in 1963), a 1928 Austin 7 was punted down the river using four punts that had been lashed together - then hoisted up under the bridge using ropes. The second incident (in 1968) a Bond or Reliant Regal three-wheeler car was dangled under the bridge.[citation needed] In neither case was the bridge damaged.

 

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Carpenter Lake, Seton, B.C. Canada.

Hydro electric flooded reservoir,

there was a wonder ful valley here at the time

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpenter_Lake

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_River_Power_Project

 

«Seton Lake, once pristine and renowned for its crystalline sky-blue colour, was turned cold and opaque by the diverted waters of the Bridge River, which are glacial and milky-green in colour.

 

Damage to the fishery on both river systems involved was incalculable.[citation needed] Although a fish ladder was built at the Seton diversion, it is generally conceded that the project virtually wiped out the entire Bridge River salmon runs, once one of the river's largest and most important and, in so doing, caused a local famine among the area's populous fishery-dependent native bands

 

the rising waters of Carpenter Lake, which also drowned what was left of Minto City (there were no residents in the area of what is now Downton Lake). Acrimony over the evictions continued for many years, and feelings from old-timers about the fate of their valley remain strong among their offspring.

 

Much of Carpenter Lake today is mudflat when reservoir levels are low, and for many years it was a stark reminder of older environmental standards, with vast forests of dead trees sticking out of the frigid, milky-blue glacial waters. Some[who?] feel that the shift in temperature regimes in the two river basins affected local climate patterns, with the upper valley now more moderate in climate and the Seton valley considerably cooler.

 

Programs in the 1980s to engage prisoners and others in the removal of these trees were launched during low-water levels, and the lake today is largely safe for boating, and while stocked for fishing it is still inadvisable for swimming due to its icy-cold water.»

2011-88: Larches are conifers in the genus Larix, in the family Pinaceae. Growing from 15 to 50m tall, they are native to much of the cooler temperate northern hemisphere, on lowlands in the north and high on mountains further south. Larch are among the dominant plants in the immense boreal forests of Russia and Canada.

Although a conifer, the larch is a deciduous tree and loses its leaves in the fall. The shoots are dimorphic, with growth divided into long shoots typically 10–50 centimetres long[citation needed] and bearing several buds, and short shoots only 1–2 mm long with only a single bud. The leaves are needle-like, 2–5 centimetres long, slender (under 1 cm wide). They are borne singly, spirally arranged on the long shoots, and in dense clusters of 20–50 needles on the short shoots. The needles turn yellow and fall in the late autumn, leaving the trees leafless through the winter.

Larch cones are erect, small, 1–9 cm long, green or purple, ripening brown 5–8 months after pollination; in about half the species the bract scales are long and visible, and in the others, short and hidden between the seed scales. Those native to northern regions have small cones (1–3 cm) with short bracts, with more southerly species tending to have longer cones (3–9 cm), often with exserted bracts, with the longest cones and bracts produced by the southernmost species, in the Himalaya.

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Sardinia (pronounced /sɑrˈdɪnɪə/; Italian: Sardegna; Sardinian: Sardigna or Sardinnya) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). The area of Sardinia is 24,090 square kilometres (9,301 sq mi). The island is surrounded (clockwise from north) by the French island of Corsica, the Italian Peninsula, Tunisia and the Spanish Balearic Islands. Sardinia is a constitutional part of Italy, with a special statute of regional autonomy under the Italian Constitution.

 

Around the beginning of the nuragic age circa 1500 BC the island was first called in greek, Hyknusa (Latinised Ichnusa) by the Mycenaeans, probably meaning island (nusa) of the Hyksos[citation needed], the people who had just been expelled by Ahmose I of Egypt circa 1540 BC. Sandalyon was another greek name, probably due to its shape, resembling a footprint. Its present name is Sardinia, after the Shardana (whose invasion of Egypt was defeated by Ramesses III circa 1180 BC).

 

Sardinia is separated from Corsica by the Strait of Bonifacio.

 

Sardinia is a generally mountainous island with a few coastal plains. The island's mountains are divided into three ranges; the highest peaks are in the middle section of the island. Punta La Marmora in the Gennargentu mountain range, at 6,016 feet (1,834 m), is the highest point in Sardinia. Sardinia has few major rivers; the largest river on the island is the Tirso, which has a length of 94 miles (151 km) and flows into the Mediterranean Sea. The island has a Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and very mild winters. The climate in the mountains tends to be wetter and cooler than the lower coastal plains; and winter snowfalls are not uncommon in the higher peaks. Sardinia also has more mountains than flat, low land and forests.

 

Until 2006, Sardinia had been divided into four provinces:

Cagliari

Nuoro

Oristano

Sassari

 

Now Sardinia is divided into eight provinces, following the creation of four more provinces just recently by the Sardinian regional government, becoming operative with the provinces' elections for the Presidents and the Councils held in 2006. The four additional provinces are as follows:

 

Carbonia-Iglesias

Medio Campidano

Ogliastra

Olbia-Tempio

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinia

 

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'Going to School in Phi Phi Island is DIFFERENT!' On White

   

The Phi Phi Islands (Thai: หมู่เกาะพีพี) are located in Thailand, between the large island of Phuket and the western Andaman Sea coast of the mainland. Phi Phi Don, the larger and principal of the two Phi Phi islands, is located at [show location on an interactive map] 7°44′00″N, 98°46′00″E. Both Phi Phi Don, and Phi Phi Leh, the smaller, are administratively part of Krabi province, most of which is on the mainland, and is located at [show location on an interactive map] 8°02′30″N, 98°48′39″E.

 

Ko Phi Phi Don ("ko" (Thai: เกาะ) meaning "island" in the Thai language) is the largest island of the group, and is the only island with permanent inhabitants, although the beaches of the second largest island, Ko Phi Phi Lee (or "Ko Phi Phi Leh"), are visited by many people as well. There are no accommodation facilities on this island, but it is just a short boat ride from Ko Phi Phi Don. The rest of the islands in the group, including Bida Nok, Bida Noi, and Bamboo Island, are not much more than large limestone rocks jutting out of the sea.

 

Phi Phi Don was initially populated by Muslim fishermen during the late 1940s, and later became a coconut plantation. The Thai population of Phi Phi Don remains more than 80% Muslim.But the actual population if counting laborers, especially from the north-east, from the mainland is much more Buddhist these days.

 

Ko Phi Phi Leh was the backdrop for the 2000 movie The Beach. Phi Phi Leh also houses the 'Viking Cave', from which there is a thriving bird's nest soup industry. There was criticism during filming of 'The Beach' that the permission granted to the film company to physically alter the environment inside Phi Phi Islands National Park was illegal. [1] The controversy cooled down however, when it was discovered that the producers had done such a decent job of restoring the place that it finally looked better than it had done before.

 

Following the release of The Beach, tourism on Phi Phi Don increased dramatically, and with it the population of the island. Many buildings were constructed without planning permission.[citation needed]

 

Ko Phi Phi was devastated by the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, when nearly all of the island's infrastructure was wiped out. Redevelopment has, however, been swift, and services like electricity, water, Internet access and ATMs are up and running again, but waste handling has been slower to come back online.

  

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from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phi_Phi_Island

 

[from wikipedia]

 

Mount Etna (Αἴτνη (Aítnē) in Classical Greek,[2] Aetna in Latin, also known as Muncibeddu (beautiful mountain) in Sicilian and Mongibello in Italian (from the Latin mons and the Arabic gibel, both meaning mountain[3]) is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. Its Arabic name was Jebel Utlamat ("the Mountain of Fire").[citation needed] According to Adrian Room’s book Placenames of the World, the name Etna is said to have originated from a Phoenician word attuna meaning “furnace.” He dismisses the theory that Etna is from a Greek source meaning “I burn.”[4] It is the largest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 metres (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) lower now than it was in 1981. It is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. This makes it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy, being about two and a half times the height of the next largest, Mount Vesuvius. Only Mount Teide in Tenerife surpasses it in the whole of the European region.[5] In Greek Mythology, the deadly monster Typhon was trapped under this mountain by Zeus, the god of the sky.

 

Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity. The fertile volcanic soils support extensive agriculture, with vineyards and orchards spread across the lower slopes of the mountain and the broad Plain of Catania to the south. Due to its history of recent activity and nearby population, Mount Etna has been designated a Decade Volcano by the United Nations.

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Sunset

taken in Koh Phi Phi Don, Thailand. June 2008

   

The Phi Phi Islands (Thai: หมู่เกาะพีพี) are located in Thailand, between the large island of Phuket and the western Andaman Sea coast of the mainland. Phi Phi Don, the larger and principal of the two Phi Phi islands, is located at [show location on an interactive map] 7°44′00″N, 98°46′00″E. Both Phi Phi Don, and Phi Phi Leh, the smaller, are administratively part of Krabi province, most of which is on the mainland, and is located at [show location on an interactive map] 8°02′30″N, 98°48′39″E.

 

Ko Phi Phi Don ("ko" (Thai: เกาะ) meaning "island" in the Thai language) is the largest island of the group, and is the only island with permanent inhabitants, although the beaches of the second largest island, Ko Phi Phi Lee (or "Ko Phi Phi Leh"), are visited by many people as well. There are no accommodation facilities on this island, but it is just a short boat ride from Ko Phi Phi Don. The rest of the islands in the group, including Bida Nok, Bida Noi, and Bamboo Island, are not much more than large limestone rocks jutting out of the sea.

 

Phi Phi Don was initially populated by Muslim fishermen during the late 1940s, and later became a coconut plantation. The Thai population of Phi Phi Don remains more than 80% Muslim.But the actual population if counting laborers, especially from the north-east, from the mainland is much more Buddhist these days.

 

Ko Phi Phi Leh was the backdrop for the 2000 movie The Beach. Phi Phi Leh also houses the 'Viking Cave', from which there is a thriving bird's nest soup industry. There was criticism during filming of 'The Beach' that the permission granted to the film company to physically alter the environment inside Phi Phi Islands National Park was illegal. [1] The controversy cooled down however, when it was discovered that the producers had done such a decent job of restoring the place that it finally looked better than it had done before.

 

Following the release of The Beach, tourism on Phi Phi Don increased dramatically, and with it the population of the island. Many buildings were constructed without planning permission.[citation needed]

 

Ko Phi Phi was devastated by the Indian Ocean tsunami of December 2004, when nearly all of the island's infrastructure was wiped out. Redevelopment has, however, been swift, and services like electricity, water, Internet access and ATMs are up and running again, but waste handling has been slower to come back online.

  

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