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Discolia soror, also known as the blue or black flower wasp.

Thank you very much for the visit and comments. Cheers.

Testing the Nikkor 105mm f2.8 macro lens.

 

The black flower wasp, Discolia soror, is around 20-30 millimetres long and has iridescent blue wings. Its legs are covered in short bristles. Male wasps are more slender than the females and have longer antennae. These wasps are found throughout mainland eastern Australia and are often seen in open bushland and suburban gardens. Black flower wasps are solitary and do not make communal nests.

 

However, in mid to late summer, they often form small swarms flying low over areas such as: turf, shrubs and compost heaps. Adult wasps can also be seen taking nectar from flowers. The adult females are large and powerful wasps and are designed to dig. They burrow into the soil to locate scarab grubs (from beetles such as the Christmas beetle), which they sting and lay an egg on.

 

When the larva emerges, it feeds on the still living scarab grub, which provides a fresh food source until the wasp larva finishes its development. The adult wasp emerges the next season. Black flower wasps can be useful predators of scarab grubs which are pests of lawns. They also pollinate native plants. Female black flower wasps can sting but rarely do, as they are not aggressive. It is not necessary to control them. (Source: www.csiro.au )

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Montage de six photographies prises sur un îlot de galets, sur le Verdon, à Gréoux-les-Bains.

 

Drôle d'insecte butineur qui était littéralement "plongé" et à moitié enfoncé dans les fleurs.

Impossible de le prendre en photo avec la tête.

 

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La Scolie hirsute (Scolia hirta) appartient à la famille des Scoliidae, sous-famille des Scoliinae, tribu des Scoliini, et du sous-genre Scolia (Discolia).

 

Cet insecte est très coloré au corps trapu couvert de poils hérissés, aux pattes robustes épineuses.

 

La Scolie n'est pas agressive, pour se faire piquer il faudrait en serrer une au creux de la main.

Sa piqûre est douloureuse mais non dangereuse pour l'homme.

 

C'est un insecte thermophile, c'est à dire qui aime la chaleur.

 

Grande butineuse, la Scolie est surtout attirée par les fleurs violettes, bleues ou cyan.

 

Les adultes peuvent mesurer de 10 à 25 mm de long, le corps est entièrement noir, ou bleu foncé, brillant, avec deux larges bandes jaunes brillantes sur l'abdomen.

Les ailes ont une couleur fumée foncée, avec des reflets bleus.

Les mâles ont des antennes plus longues que celles des femelles (composées de 13 segments au lieu de 12) et sont pourvus de trois grandes épines à l'extrémité de leur abdomen.

La Scolie possède de puissantes et impressionnantes mandibules.

 

Ces insectes creusent le sol meuble grâce à leurs pattes antérieures fortes et très épineuses, à la recherche de larves de coléoptères souterrains (Cétoines, Scarabées, Oryctes, petits Hannetons...).

La Scolie paralyse sans la tuer, la larve sur laquelle elle va pondre un oeuf et qui va servir de nourriture à sa progéniture.

 

La Scolie hirsute vit dans des sites chauds, de préférence sableux avec une végétation clairsemée.

Obviously looking for something, and not wanting to sit still for the camera. Black flower wasp, Austroscolia soror, probably female. Como NSW Australia, February 2011.

Yesterday we went to Mount Annan Botanical Gardens. I was lucky enough to get a photo of a Blue flower wasp. These guys are speedy and I didnt have a lot of time to get a couple of shots. I have been trying for ages to get a photo of one of these guys. They are so pretty and have the most iridescent blue wings.

For more info

www.csiro.au/resources/ps1va.html

No, Scoliid Wasps don't collect nectar for their 'young', their eggs and larvae. They feed autonomously on paralized caterpillars and larvae of others. But the adults like a good sip of nectar. You can see them foraging daily in the patches of Creeping Oxeye, Wedelia trilobata that sprout up between the basalt rocks of Tanjung Mangsit just out of the reach of the briny spray of the sea.

This is pretty Orange-Headed Scolia vollenhoveni described by the Swiss mineralogist and entomologist Henri Louis Frédéric de Saussure (1829-1905) in 1859.

On waking up this morning, I had - appropriate to the name of the Wasp that I was to photograph later - thought about two great sons out of Saussure's large 'brood'. I guess being in an environment of a variety of languages had brought that on. First of René (1868-1943), an important reformer of Esperanto. And then it was clear to me how fitting the work of his elder brother Ferdinand (1857-1913), famous linguist, is to classification schemes in taxonomy. The meanings we give to the words we use with reference to things are the evolving result of interaction with other users of those words. For example, there is nothing in our flower that forces us to call it 'Wedelia'. That word - a latinisation of the name of Georg Wedel (1645-1721) - is a 'mere' eponym. Botanists have decided 'collectively' to use that word to name this plant generically. And the botanical community can make the name more specific, in this case - trilobata - based on the physical appearance of this pretty Creeping Oxeye or for other reasons.

I guess it was some kind of serendipity that led my eye this morning to light upon our Saussurian Wasp!

The Goldenrod is a bitter astringent and relaxant herb that reduces inflammation. However, this wasp here finds its pollen specially soothing.

I had stopped to have a drink on my walk when this beautiful insect landed by my feet.

 

The black flower wasp, Discolia soror, is around 20-30 millimetres long and has iridescent blue wings. Its legs are covered in short bristles. Male wasps are more slender than the females and have longer antennae.

These wasps are found throughout mainland eastern Australia and are often seen in open bushland and suburban gardens.

Black flower wasps are solitary and do not make communal nests.

Adult wasps can also be seen taking nectar from flowers.

The adult females are large and powerful wasps and are designed to dig. They burrow into the soil to locate scarab grubs (from beetles such as the Christmas beetle), which they sting and lay an egg on.

When the larva emerges, it feeds on the still living scarab grub, which provides a fresh food source until the wasp larva finishes its development. The adult wasp emerges the next season.

Black flower wasps can be useful predators of scarab grubs which are pests of lawns. They also pollinate native plants.

 

Female black flower wasps can sting but rarely do, as they are not aggressive. It is not necessary to control them.

The blue flower wasp is many times larger than the bee

Scolia (Discolia) verticalis

Thanks to Gerry (*Ryn*) for the I.D.

A very interesting species of wasp. The adults feed on nectar, however the wingless female burrows into the ground and parasitises beetle larvae and mole crickets, laying her eggs on them.

I was fortunate to find this couple in nuptial bliss before they flew off to enjoy their wedding breakfast in a flower somewhere. They are important pollinators of native plants.

The females are sometimes mistaken for ants and in fact one species has the common name of 'blue ant".

www.faunanet.gov.au/wos/factfile.cfm?Fact_ID=226

Identifier: naturalistintran00dist

Title: A naturalist in the Transvaal

Year: 1892 (1890s)

Authors: Distant, William Lucas, 1845-1922

Subjects: Zoology -- South Africa Transvaal Transvaal (South Africa) -- Description and travel

Publisher: London, R.H. Porter

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

W Rirkiss del. Miritern- Bros. Chrorno. 1. Cimex figu.ra.Uis,va.r. 5. Veterna patula. 9 . Lygaeus deser-Lus . 2. Holcostetkus obscuratus. S. Antestia. transvaalia.. lO.Lygseus cajrapestris 3. Halyomorpha. ca.pjta.ta.. 7. Lygaeus planitiae 11 . Nysms n.ovitius.. 4. HalyomorpKa. pretoriee . 8. Plina.cKtu.s falca,tns. 12. TransvaaJia. Ivigens . R.H .Porter, Publisher, NAT . IN TRANSVAAL. T.3LV. TV.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

10. 11. W. Purkiss del. Mintern. Bros. Chromo.1. .Xipkocera. distant!. 4,a,b,c,dl,e, Sematocera .gen..chara.ct. 8.Mesa diapherogamia.. •2.Xiphocera, picta. 5 . Chrotogonus Tneridion.alis. 3. Discolia praestatilis. 3. Petasia. spumaris var.ater. 6. Ampulexnigroccerulea.. 10 Arxcylopus fuscipennis . 4.Sema.tocera iul]girup-un.cta. 7-Mutilla altistjda. 11 .Discolia prgEcana.. R. H. Porter. PutlisKer, Lon.don-. ;N TRANSVAAL,. Tab V:

  

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Even at twilight her wings are a strong iridescent blue. Black flower wasp, Austroscolia soror. Como NSW Australia, February 2011.

Scolia and Megachile, AFAIK. On Nuytsia, Baldivis, Perth

Identifier: naturalistintran00dist

Title: A naturalist in the Transvaal

Year: 1892 (1890s)

Authors: Distant, William Lucas, 1845-1922

Subjects: Zoology -- South Africa Transvaal Transvaal (South Africa) -- Description and travel

Publisher: London, R.H. Porter

Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

10. 11. W. Purkiss del. Mintern. Bros. Chromo.1. .Xipkocera. distant!. 4,a,b,c,dl,e, Sematocera .gen..chara.ct. 8.Mesa diapherogamia.. •2.Xiphocera, picta. 5 . Chrotogonus Tneridion.alis. 3. Discolia praestatilis. 3. Petasia. spumaris var.ater. 6. Ampulexnigroccerulea.. 10 Arxcylopus fuscipennis . 4.Sema.tocera iul]girup-un.cta. 7-Mutilla altistjda. 11 .Discolia prgEcana.. R. H. Porter. PutlisKer, Lon.don-. ;N TRANSVAAL,. Tab V:

 

Text Appearing After Image:

W. Purkis s del . eL li Lh . 1. Homonotas anemia 2 . CypKon.on.yx- an.tenna.ta . 3. Eriocnemis im-siitus . 4. NepKila. tratxsvaalica.. crn. Bros . imp. 5 Iviygruinia fallax.6. Homonotiis pedestris .7 My^rumia. distazvti.8. Mygrumia belzetutK. R.H.Port.ei-, PublisKer,London SECOND EDITION.Noiv issuing, price 12s. Qd. each Part. COLOURED FIGURES OF THE BIRDS OF THE BRITISH ISLANDS. ISSUED BY LORD LILFORD, F.Z.S. &c., PRESIDENT OF THE BRITISH ORNITHOLOGISTS UNION. Lord Lilfords work (now in progress) only requires to be known to have as manyadmirers as there are lovers of birds, and as many subscribers as can afford it.—SirHerbert Maxwell, Bart., M.P. I am delighted with the Coloured Figures of the Birds of the British Islands,issued by Lord Lilford, and know of no plates so good as those to be found in thatwork.—#. Stacy Marks, E.A., F.Z.S. The standard of excellence is fully maintained.—Ibis. Nothing more life-like and artistic can be imagined.—Academy. Medium 8vo, Three Vo

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Yorrick identifies this as "Scoliidae, Hymenoptera" but now that I do some research I think this is the black flower wasp, Discolia soror

 

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