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Callocephalon fimbriatum. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group.

 

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Callocephalon fimbriatum. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group.

 

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Callocephalon fimbriatum. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group.

 

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Callocephalon fimbriatum

  

(Enjoy my photos).......

Callocephalon fimbriatum. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group

 

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Male Gang-gang Cockatoo feeding in a dying conifer at Commonwealth Park, Canberra.

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The Gang-gang Cockatoo, Callocephalon fimbriatum, is found in the cooler and wetter forests and woodlands of Australia, particularly alpine bushland. Mostly mild grey in colour with some lighter scalloping (more pronounced and buffish in females) the male has a red head and crest, while the female has a small fluffy grey crest. It ranges throughout south-eastern Australia.

 

The Gang-gang Cockatoo is the faunal emblem of the Australian Capital Territory. It is easily identified by its distinctive call, which is described as resembling a creaky gate, or the sound of a cork being pulled from a wine bottle.

 

The name Gang-gang comes from a New South Wales Aboriginal language, either Ngunnawal or Wiradjuri. It is possible both language groups called it gang gang.

You can almost touch these birds when they are feasting on Hawthorn berries.

Callocephalon fimbriatum

 

male

A loving male? :) (Or to be nibbled on the ear by a Gang-gang!!)

Gang Gang Cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) enjoying a feed of Hawthorn berries.

Small cockatoo of the south east Australian forests. Eats seeds, fruits and insect larvae. Seen on the streets of Canberra ACT.

Callocephalon fimbriatum. amazing how many berries she can shuck at once in her mouth. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group

 

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Gang-gang Cockatoos (Immature female (left) & male)

Callocephalon fimbriatum

 

March 3rd, 2018

Yarra Glen, Victoria, Australia

 

Canon EOS 1D X Mark II

Canon EF 300mm f2.8L IS USM lens

Canon 600EX II-RT flash

 

Found a family of four Gang-gangs feeding on Hawthorn berries together. The parents were feeding in separate bushes, but these siblings were feeding closely together. They were somewhat apprehensive with my presence initially (illustrated here with the young female on the left having her crest raised), but the soft creaking noises of their parents provided reassurance & they soon continued feasting.

a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

New South Wales, Australia

 

All of my images are copyright-protected. They may not be reproduced or downloaded without my written permission.

 

Thanks for your views and comments.

 

My website: www.michaelhanveyphotography.com

A male seen here feeding on the Hawthorn bush where they extract the single hard seed from the berries.

Callocephalon fimbriatum. Seen at Banyule Flats Reserve, Viewbank, Victoria, Australia, with the Melbourne Bird Photographers Meetup Group.

 

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a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

You can almost touch these birds when they are feasting on Hawthorn berries.

Gang-gang Cockatoo, Callocephalon fimbriatum, 32 - 36 cm. / 12.6 - 14.2 in. COMMON and ENDEMIC cockatoo. Prefers open forests and can be found at farms, in suburbs and woodlands in the fall and winter seasons.

 

Lorne, Victoria, Australia. ©bryanjsmith

The gang-gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) is found in the cooler and wetter forests and woodlands of Australia, particularly alpine bushland. Mostly mild grey in colour with some lighter scalloping (more pronounced and buffy in females), the male has a red head and crest, while the female has a small fluffy grey crest. It ranges throughout south-eastern Australia. It is easily identified by its distinctive call, which is described as resembling a creaky gate, or the sound of a cork being pulled from a wine bottle.

Enjoying some eucalypt flowers at Airey's Inlet, Vic.

a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

Gang-gang Cockatoo (male)

Callocephalon fimbriatum

 

February 22nd, 2018

Yarra Glen, Victoria, Australia

 

Canon EOS 1D X Mark II

Canon EF 600mm f4L IS II USM lens

Canon EF 1.4x III Extender

Canon 600EX II-RT flash with extender

 

Usually found in small family flocks, these stunning cockatoos spend the Summer months preparing for their post-breeding dispersal by fattening up on the seeds found within these Hawthorne berries. Each year I look forward to their annual feasting, as they often allow close approach while they are busy gorging themselves!

 

I came across this family in Yarra Glen on my way home from a Port Fairy trip in February. I love the sound of 'pop-pop-pop' as the Gang-gangs bust open dozens and dozens of berries to retrieve their seeds.

Parrots in captivity /.

London :George Bell and Sons,1884-1887 [i.e. 1883-1888].

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41402901

The gang-gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) is found in the cooler and wetter forests and woodlands of Australia, particularly alpine bushland. Mostly mild grey in colour with some lighter scalloping (more pronounced and buffy in females), the male has a red head and crest, while the female has a small fluffy grey crest. It ranges throughout south-eastern Australia.

Jul 12, 2007 #468

I know. I know enough already, but he presented himself so well I just had to take another shot of him.

Recently I was asked to provide a higher resolution version of a photo I had taken of the Lake at night (for an upcoming TV interview). Here was the original photo, taken back in 2009 (www.flickr.com/photos/callocephalon/3507254398/).

Feeling rather inspired, I decided to try the same thing again, and took off for Lake Burley Griffin as it was getting dark this evening. Here is the 2014 version!

(Which is better?)

a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

Gang-gang cockatoo chewing on a eucalyptus tree.

a rare Gang Gang cockatoo (Callocephalon fimbriatum) feeding on Hawthorn in an Albury back yard

Albury NSW Australia

 

© Dirk HR Spennemann 2017, All Rights Reserved

Access all my images via the Collections Page

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