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The Library window reflected the beautiful trees iin the small park next door. I do like Libraries that have a beautiful outlook like this. The golden berries are from the White Cedar tree (thanks Dave). www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2008/melia-azedarach.html

I know it's not high detail, but I do love the colour of this daisy.

 

A lovely afternoon at the ANBG with madbronny52.

On Saturday evening I went along with the family to a special members event at the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG). The rainforest gully walk has been kitted out with low wattage LED lighting funded by the 'Friends of the Botanic Gardens' and Saturday night was the first time they were showing it off.

 

I had brought my tripod and camera with me … I decided on a single lens for the night: my Nikkor 20mm f/2.8D … a little jewel of a lens. I wanted something quite fast and wide and my tripod enabled the longer exposures you see here.

 

Lushpup Images | Lushpup Blog

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

(Piccabeen Palm / Palma Payanesa)

 

Bangalow Palm is endemic to Australia and is found naturally occurring from around Mackay, Queensland to the Bateman's Bay area of New South Wales. This palm has a solitary stem and reaches a height of up to 30m and a diameter of up to 30cm.

 

La Ceja, Colombia; 2300 meters above sea level.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2015/archontophoenix-cunningh...

Red and Green Kangaroo Paw, Anigozanthos manglesii was proclaimed the floral emblem of Western Australia on 9 November 1960.

 

another unique flower to this region.

 

for more details check this site out...

www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/wa.emblem.html

A female Australian Wood Duck enjoying a good splash at the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra.

taken at the Sunset Gardens in Menlo Park - these little guys stir the imagination and remind me of the creatures in Maurice Sendak's classic children's story "Where the Wild Things Are".

 

more info about these plants here...

Look at my old wise look. This bird reminds me of merlin the happy wizard.

I cant get enough of this bird they are way cool on my list of birds. Shot taken ANBG's ACT

Dryandra sp.

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage..

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora, the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild..

History of the Gardens.

When Canberra was being planned in the 1930s, the establishment of the gardens was recommended in a report in 1933 by the Advisory Council of Federal Capital Territory. In 1935, The Dickson Report set forth a framework for their development. A large site for the gardens was set aside on Black Mountain. In September 1949, the Ceremonial planting of first trees by Prime Minister Ben Chifley and Director of Kew Gardens, Sir Edward Salisbury took place. Development of the site, facilities and collection progressed and the Gardens were officially opened in October 1970 by Prime Minister John Gorton..

The Gardens has tenure over 90 hectares on Black Mountain. About 40 hectares are currently developed as the Botanic Gardens. Plans for the development of the remaining land are on hold until funds are available.

Tufted perennial herb - corroboration that Australia has its own native lily. Though botanists again cannot agree on the taxonomy here - it can be placed in Phormiaceae, Hemerocallidaceae or Liliaceae family.

 

It was a bit of challenge to take this shot, as it was very windy, and this little delicate flowers would not be still!

 

Nodding Blue-lily can be found everywhere in Australia except for Northern Territory and Tasmania.

One web source says the juice from crushed stems applied to wounds promotes healing.

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2007/stypandra-glauca.html

plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&am...

 

Photographed in Maranoa Gardens in Balwyn, Melbourne, Australia

 

Copyright - All Rights Reserved - Black Diamond Images

 

Image has 77 NOTES identifying all species to scientific name + hyperlinks to an authoritative source.

 

This fine and detailed 3 metre mural was commissioned by Sea Acres Nature Reseve , Port Macquarie and was collaboratively painted by 2 artists - Jo Davidson & Tertius, first going on exhibition as part of the "Natural Wonders of the Hastings Valley" exhibition which opened on 18th March and ran till the 14th May 2008.

 

Here is a list of Widlife in Sea Acres from the NSW National Parks Wildlife Atlas.

 

Sea Acres Nature Reserve, Port Macquarie is a remnant subtropical rainforest virtually in the centre of Port Macquarie. Surveys conducted by Alex Floyd and others have located over 265 plant species within the reserve boundaries.

Sea Acres is a must visit place if you are in the area with expert guides available to ensure that your visit is both enjoyable as well as educational.

This wonderful mural is in the visitors centre and It shows many of the species you may find as you walk on the elevated 1.3km boardwalk through the tranquil rainforest.

 

The following is from the Sea Acres Plan of Management

 

PLANTS

Three floristic types of rainforest have been classified within the reserve. The

greatest species diversity and development occurs in the sub-tropical rainforest along

the creek and protected slopes and moist easterly aspect of the valley. Typical

species are the bangalow palm (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana), giant water gum

(Syzygium francisii), native tamarind (Diploglottis australis), yellow carabeen (Sloanea

woollsii) and many laurel and myrtle species. Research is presently being undertaken

on the reserve to determine the age of the bangalow palms.

Littoral rainforest with typically salt-tolerant species, stunted forest height and windsheared

crowns is found on the exposed seaward slopes. Species diversity on these

exposed slopes is relatively low, with only 50 species being recorded. The more

common species are gap axe (Arytera divaricata), tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis

anacardioides), red olive berry (Elaeodendron australe), yellow tulip (Drypetes

australasica), large mock olive (Notelaea longifolia) and flintwood (Scolopia braunii).

A dry rainforest association with greater species diversity is found on the western

aspect of the coastal ridge between the beach and the creek. Gap axe (Arytera

divaricata) and black apple (Planchonella australis) are the most common species.

The remainder of the reserve includes sites of open coastal heath on the exposed

seaward slopes with open sclerophyll forest on the western upper slopes and ridges.

The heath vegetation is dominated by coast banksia (Banksia integrifolia) with stands

of screw palm (Pandanus pedunculata) and horsetail she-oak (Casuarina

equisetifolia) jutting from steep locations along the coastal scarp. The open forest is

characterised by coastal blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis), tallowood (E. microcorys),

flooded gum (E. grandis) and the red and pink bloodwoods (E. gummifera and E.

intermedia). Necklace pod (Sophora tomentosa) which is uncommon on the NSW

north coast is found at its southern limit within the reserve.

 

My Note - Acronychia littoralis is also reportedly at its southern limit here.

 

WILDLIFE

The nature reserve provides valuable habitat for a diversity of wildlife. Twenty one

mammal species, over 100 species of birds, 17 species of reptiles, 6 frogs and

numerous invertebrates including a rare freshwater snail (Fluvidona sp.) known only

from this location have been recorded to date. Four species found in the reserve are

presently on the endangered fauna list. These are the koala (Phascolarctos

cinereus), rose-crowned fruit-dove (Ptilinopus regina), wompoo fruit-dove (Ptilinopus

magnificus) and glossy black cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus lathami).

 

Australian Rainforest Education

 

IDENTIFYING AUSTRALIAN RAINFOREST PLANTS,TREES & FUNGI - Flick Group --> DATABASE INDEX

 

These little Silvereyes were looking irresistable as they tucked into the berries. So irresistible that I forgot to look at what the bush was, however thanks to Tattters and Ozymiles for identifying it as a Callicarpa pedunculata - 'Velvet Leaf'.

 

After lunch at the gardens I spent more than an hour mit Kamera wandering in beautiful autumn weather amongst the birds and bushes.

 

The gardens are a great hang-out for regular and itinerant birds. Some of the more famous residents are the family of White-winged Choughs that infest the outoor part of the cafe restaurant. Normally they threaten by flying onto or near your table, or swooping 10cm above your head, or lining up on a branch only a metre or two away to look disturbingly Hitchcockian. They will regularly take food from your plate if you leave the table, or even if you look away for too long. But today I had an Anzac biscuit still in my hand on the way to my mouth, when a Chough flew across the table at warp speed right between the two of us, elevation 1 foot, and grabbed the thing out of my hand. According to staff this is a new phase of the war; new measures are required. The Americans are suggesting twenty thousand more troops, I'm not sure.

The bottlebrush is one of the most popular bushes in Australia and as well as being grown in gardens it is planted along nature strips throughout many of our cities and townships. Gorgeous!! One reason it is so popular is that it attracts our native birds. The bottlebrush comes in a variety of reds, pinks and yellow/cream shades

 

The flower spikes of bottlebrushes form in spring and summer and are made up of a number of individual flowers. The pollen of the flower forms on the tip of a long coloured stalk called a filament. It is these filaments which give the flower spike its colour and distinctive 'bottlebrush' shape. The filaments are usually yellow or red, sometimes the pollen also adds a bright yellow flush to the flower spikes.

 

Each flower produces a small woody fruit containing hundreds of tiny seeds. These fruits form in clusters along the stem, and are usually held on the plant for many years. The seeds are usually not released from the fruits for several years, but in some species the fruits open after about a year. Fire also stimulates the opening of the fruits in some bottlebrushes.

 

The new leaves of many bottlebrushes are very ornamental. The leaves are often coloured and, in some species, they are covered with fine, soft hairs.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/callistemon/index.html

 

Do view large.

These large butterflies were very photogenic on the callistemon, so there will probably be several pics coming.

I stumbled across this beautiful discarded Waratah on the shore this evening and decided to find a place for it in my shot.

The Waratah is a native australian plant particularly to the southeastern region of Australia (New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania) and is the floral emblem of New South Wales.

Some more info: www.anbg.gov.au/emblems/nsw.emblem.html

(A 'long' 30 sec exposure shot for the weekly theme)

 

Australian National Botanic Gardens - Gippsland Water Dragon or Australian Water Dragon

 

The Australian Water Dragon (Physignathus lesueurii), which includes the Eastern Water Dragon (P. l. lesueurii) and the Gippsland Water Dragon (P. l. howittii) subspecies, is an arboreal agamid species native to Eastern Australia from Victoria north to Queensland. Australian water dragons are extremely shy in the wild, but readily adapt to continual human presence in suburban parks and gardens. They are fast runners and strong climbers. When presented with a potential predator, they seek cover in thick vegetation, or drop from an overhanging branch into water. They are able to swim totally submerged, and rest on the bottom of shallow creeks or lakes for up to 90 minutes to avoid detection.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gippsland_Water_Dragon

 

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage.

 

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora, the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_National_Botanic_Gardens

 

www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/index.html

Swainsona galegifolia

 

On the billabong bush path, mid September.

 

Probably the time I got the tick stuck on my head, sitting amonst the long grass.

We don't go there till next Autumn, as the big browns take over for the summer.

 

From below, I can see more clusters of fire engine red popping up around the hillside, but I've got enough pics of these anyway for now.

 

Have found an orange version of these somewhere else.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/phtml?pc=dig&pn=6957&size=3

 

Trimmed a tiny off.

Looks nice viewed in large.

 

Enjoy your weekend x

 

Their bark is far worse than their bite...

[Sorry - couldn't resist a silly pun!]

 

There are 173 (known) species (with some classification still shifting - as with many Australian plants). Many banksias flower over autumn and winter, with the flower heads made up of "hundreds (sometimes thousands) of tiny individual flowers grouped together in pairs". This, and lots of other useful information, including excellent diagrams & pictures, in the 'Banksia' page @ the Australian National Botanic Gardens (Australian Government website; they also have the banksia as their emblem). I like their idea of 'easy': "Banksias are easily propagated from seed. A common way to release seed is to place the 'cone' in an oven at 120°-140° C for about an hour. The follicles then open and the seeds can be removed with tweezers." Sounds like fun!

 

[Banksia bark_CU_IMG_2265]

Blechnum patersonii, ANBG rainforest gully, Canberra

Found these old lichen encrusted yards near the track to the lower falls, hung around for a while until the afternoon light came through.

 

Beard lichen, genus Usnea with Flavoparmelia rutidota, common on living trees or dead wood in many parts of the southern half of Australia and has been described as "probably the commonest lichen found on dead wood in Australia". Xanthoparmelia species are mostly on rock and rarely on wood. Also an unidentified red lichen.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/lichen/xanthoparmelia.html

www.anbg.gov.au/lichen/photos-captions/flavoparmelia-ruti...

Alright, I know... I'm running out of bee titles.

Fungus fly (Tapeigaster sp.) on coral fungus (Ramaria sp.) ANBG eucalypt lawn, Canberra

Gosford Waterfront, NSW, Australia

There are 173 Banksia species, and all but one occur naturally only in Australia. Banksias were named after Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820 ), who, in 1770, was the first European to collect specimens of these plants.

The flower heads are made up of hundreds (sometimes thousands) of tiny individual flowers grouped together in pairs. The colour of the flower heads usually ranges from yellow to red. Many species flower over autumn and winter.

www.anbg.gov.au/banksia/

(Explored) Today I went to a beautiful location in Yaegl Country - Brooms Head - up here on the North Coast. I was here yesterday and it was raining.

I read that Pigface - the plant in the foreground - has the botanical name Carpobrotus glaucescens - see the the full story here: www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2005/carpobrotus-glaucescens.....

and extract is here :

"Derivation of the name:

 

Carpobrotus - comes from the Greek ‘karpos' (fruit) and ‘brota' (edible thing) and refers to the edible fruits."

 

That's why I called it "Edible Thing" rather than Pigface.

 

This is also the first time that I used the "Big Stopper" - a 10 stop filter by Lee,

11mm

f/9

3s

ISO 200

RAW adjustments in ACR

 

Have a good weekend everyone.

 

Best viewed @ large size

 

Scrophulariaceae - Southeastern Australia

Derwentia

Shown: Detail of flowers

 

For detailed description and distribution map, visit:

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2003/derwentia-perfoliata.html

 

Additional views:

farm4.static.flickr.com/3662/3596330029_ff1af0c067_b.jpg

farm3.static.flickr.com/2458/3596923693_b951c0024c_b.jpg

farm4.static.flickr.com/3604/3597791702_bd555735f2_b.jpg

farm4.static.flickr.com/3610/3597816286_93d589011c_b.jpg

 

Photographed in San Francisco Botanical Garden - San Francisco, California

Gum blossoms and gumnuts always reminds me of a book my mum used to read to us when we were young, "Snugglepot and Cuddlepie" by May Gibbs.

It's stories of the adventures of two gumnut babies. The baddies in the story are the mean old banksia men.

They even made it as an postage stamp.

One of the most commonly observed birds at the Botanic Gardens. This I like because of the muted colours of the um... Correa.

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

(Piccabeen Palm / Palma Payanesa)

 

Bangalow Palm is endemic to Australia and is found naturally occurring from around Mackay, Queensland to the Bateman's Bay area of New South Wales. This palm has a solitary stem and reaches a height of up to 30m and a diameter of up to 30cm.

 

This palm is very common in La Ceja, Colombia as an ornamental plant bordering the streets and households.

 

Photo taken in La Ceja, Colombia; 2300 meters above sea level.

 

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2015/archontophoenix-cunningh...

Ubiquitous and beautiful, around Canberra the Crimson Rosella is a sitting duck for photographers BUT....

1. the absolute redness of its plumage is hard to nail, and

2. it challenges the photographer to take a different perspective on this oft-shot species.

 

Here, this lovely bird sits atop some by product of a local winery at Wallaroo Road near Hall, the last vestiges of light illuminated the brilliant plumage.

 

shot from car (a great mobile bird hide :)

A Silvereye pauses briefly before disappearing back into the foliage to continue feeding with the rest of its active little flock.

Australian National Botanic Garden, Canberra, Australia.

Taken into the afternoon sun - always luv this effect!!

The native flannel flowers are so delicate and soft!

My mum used to luv them as they reminded her of the Edelweiss of her homeland.

The current seasons crop in the bush around the house are rather small this season so far.

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2002/actinotus-helianthi.html

 

A Have a great day!! ;))

Red Wattlebird with a partly dismembered cicada at the Australian National Botanic Gardens in Canberra.

An Eastern Spinebill pausing briefly on a Kangaroo Paw stem.

endemic to North Queensland, Australia

Shrub or small tree to 6m, of Myrtaceae family.

Found on my walk to work as newly planted street tree (just 1m high, flowering already)

www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/gnp-extras/xanthostemon-verticillatus...

Superb Fairy Wren or Fairywren.

 

The Superb Fairywren (Malurus cyaneus), also known as the Superb Blue-wren or colloquially as the Blue Wren, is a passerine bird of the family Maluridae, common and familiar across southeastern Australia. The species is sedentary and territorial, also exhibiting a high degree of sexual dimorphism; the male in breeding plumage has a striking bright blue forehead, ear coverts, mantle, and tail, with a black mask and black or dark blue throat. Like other fairywrens, the Superb Fairywren is notable for several peculiar behavioural characteristics; the birds are socially monogamous and sexually promiscuous, meaning that although they form pairs between one male and one female, each partner will mate with other individuals and even assist in raising the young from such pairings. Male wrens pluck yellow petals and display them to females as part of a courtship display.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superb_Fairywren

 

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) are located in Canberra and are administered by the Australian Government's Department of the Environment and Heritage.

 

The botanic gardens are the largest living collection of native Australian flora,[1] the mission of the ANBG is to study and promote Australia's flora. The gardens maintains a wide variety of botanical resources for researchers and cultivates native plants threatened in the wild.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_National_Botanic_Gardens

 

www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/index.html

These colourful butterflies have been emerging from their pupae in the last couple of weeks.

They had just watered the rainforest gully in the Botanic Gardens, which added to the photographic oportunities. This is the leaves of a cycad.

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