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Detailed Types of Qi and the Map of the Creation of Qi | by QI MAGEN
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Detailed Types of Qi and the Map of the Creation of Qi

Detailed Types of Qi and the Map of the Creation of Qi

 

Detailed Types of Qi

Map of the Creation of Qi

The graphic describes the processes which take place within the body to produce the various types of Qi. Each type of Qi is described in full detail below.

 

While we use the word Qi to mean energy, it is clear from the Chinese medical theories that there are many aspects and differentations of Qi. Different types of Qi vary in how they are used by the body and what imbalances are caused by a deficiency. For example, Jing deficiency in children may present with signs of slow growth and poor mental development, whereas, a person with a deficiency of Wei Qi may experience frequent colds and/or infections.

 

The various types of Qi and their corresponding sources, functions, distributions and relevance are described below:

 

Jing (Essence)

Source:

- Derived from parents, supplemented by Acquired Qi (Gu Qi & Wei Qi).

Function:

- Responsible for growth, reproduction and development.

Distribution:

- Stored mainly in the Kidneys.

Relevance:

- Weak Jing in children may lead to poor bone development, slow learning a/or poor concentration.

 

- Weak Jing in the elderly may lead to deafness, osteoporosis a/or unclear thinking.

 

Yuan Qi (Original Qi)

Source:

- Derived from Jing.

Function:

- Promotes and stimulates functional activities of organs.

- Provides the foundation/catalyst for the production of Zhen Qi.

Distribution:

- Originates in the ming men, circulates via the TH, pools in the meridians at the Yuan Source points.

Relevance:

Deficiencies in Yuan Qi may lead to poor development of Acquired Qi.

Gu Qi (Essence of Food and Grain Qi)

Source:

- Originates from the action of the Spleen on the food in the Stomach.

Function:

- Combines with Kong Qi to form Zong Qi.

- Some aspects are also transformed into Blood.

Distribution:

- Arises in the ST/SP and is moved to the chest where it is further distributed.

Relevance:

- Good quality food and a strong ST/SP are important to generate energy.

- Weaknesses in the SP may lead to bloating, distention, fatigue, loss of appetite, etc.

Kong Qi (Air Qi)

Source:

- Originates from the air received by the Lungs.

Function:

- Combines with Gu Qi to form Zong Qi.

Distribution:

- Distributed from the chest.

Relevance:

- Good quality air and good breathing practices are essential for the formation of energy.

Zong Qi (Gathering Qi)

Source:

- Combination of Gu Qi & Kong Qi.

Function:

- Nourish the Heart and Lungs

- Aids the Lungs in their role of respiration and circulating energy throughout the body.

- Assists the Heart in circulating Blood through the vessels.

 

Distribution:

- Stored in the chest.

Relevance:

- With a deficiency you will see the HT and LU most effectted.

 

- Low energy, weak voice, poor circulation in the extremeties, etc.

- Can be treated with CV 17 and the yuan source points of the HT (HT 7) & LU (LU 9).

 

Zhen Qi (True Qi)

Source:

- Derived from Zong Qi when acted upon by Yuan Qi.

Function:

- This is the form of Qi that circulates in the meridians and nourishes the organs.

Distribution:

- Originates in the chest and is distributed throughout the body by respiration. - Composite of: Ying Qi & Wei Qi.

Relevance:

- Deficiencies indicate either an imbalance in the functioning of the creation of acquired Qi or in a declining amount of Yuan Qi.

Ying Qi (Nutritive Qi)

Function:

  

- Nourishes the organs.

- Helps to produce Blood.

 

Distribution:

- Circulates in the main meridians.

- Flows with the Blood in the main meridians and within the Blood vessels.

Relevance:

 

- This is the aspect of Qi that is needled with acupuncture.

 

Wei Qi (Defensive Qi)

Function:

- Helps to protect the body.

- Warms the surface of the body.

  

- Regulates body temperature by opening a/or closing the pores.

 

Distribution:

- On the surface of the body and within the muscles and skin, but not within the meridians.

- Circulation is dependent on the Lungs.

Relevance:

- People who catch colds easily/often have Wei Qi deficiency.

 

- Deficiency may also make it difficult to regulate body temperature.

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Taken on April 19, 2007