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Imposing Entrance to Supreme Court Building, United States Supreme Court, Washington, D.C. | by Ken Lund
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Imposing Entrance to Supreme Court Building, United States Supreme Court, Washington, D.C.

The Supreme Court Building is the seat of the Supreme Court of the United States. Completed in 1935, it is situated in Washington, D.C. at 1 First Street, NE, on the block immediately east of the United States Capitol. The building is under the jurisdiction of the Architect of the Capitol. On May 4, 1987, the Supreme Court Building was designated a National Historic Landmark.

 

After the federal government moved to Washington, D.C., the court had no permanent meeting location until 1810. When the architect Benjamin Latrobe built the second U.S. Senate chamber directly on top of first US Senate chamber, the Supreme Court took up residence in what is now referred to as the Old Supreme Court Chamber from 1810 through 1860. It remained in the Capitol until 1935, with the exception of a period from 1812 to 1819, during which the Court was absent from Washington because of the British invasion and destruction of the Capitol in the War of 1812.

 

The Supreme Court Building is located at 1 First Street, NE (across the street from the Capitol) and was designed by architect Cass Gilbert (as Gilbert's last major project; he died before it was completed). It rises four stories (92 ft (28 m)) above ground. The cornerstone was laid on October 13, 1932, and construction completed in 1935, having cost $94,000 under the $9.74 million budget authorized by Congress. "The building was designed on a scale in keeping with the importance and dignity of the Court and the Judiciary as a coequal, independent branch of the United States Government, and as a symbol of 'the national ideal of justice in the highest sphere of activity.'"

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Supreme_Court_Building

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Text_of_Creative_Commons_...

 

In 1810, the Supreme Court first occupied the Old Supreme Court Chamber in the Capitol.[4] As the Senate expanded, it progressively outgrew its quarters. In 1860, the Supreme Court moved to the Old Senate Chamber (as it is now known) where it remained until its move to the current Supreme Court building. In 1929, Chief Justice William Howard Taft argued successfully for the Court to have its own headquarters to distance itself from Congress as an independent branch of government, but did not live to see it built. The court was finally designed by Cass Gilbert, who created many other structures in the United States.

 

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Taken on July 25, 2008