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Final Sunset Gocco | by e50e
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Final Sunset Gocco

What a process this was! Originally it was going to take five gocco screens. The final layer, however did not burn consistently around the edges of the B6 master and in the areas of the thick black strips of color. Instead, I decided to burn the image on a regular silkscreen and print the final black layer by hand that way. It does look much better than the splotchy coverage of the gocco screen.

 

I had to leave out some of the details in the print to make it go more smoothly, but I'm happy with the result. Looking at the prints now I have ones with better registration I could have photographed, but this is the one that is up!

 

I used the acetate registration method with the gocco and it was only slightly off. I taped a wooden drying rack on the side of my gocco that coincidentally was the same height and adhered the transparency to that. I was able to gauge after a few prints in what direction I needed to move the paper to really get it to line up from the image on the acetate. The acetate with the regular silkscreen worked wonderfully. I'm excited to burn another screen and print another image. T-shirts perhaps??

 

Oh, and the screen burning was a headache. I went with the advice of someone who was drunk and only burned it for 5 minutes when I just *knew* it needed to be longer. So, when all of the emulsion around the image rinsed out of the screen after the first attempt I had to drive to the store at midnight, buy some bleach, remove the rest of the photo emulsion from the screen, re-apply it and wait two hours to burn it. I had to set the alarm at 4 am to wake myself up to burn the screen (for 15 minutes!) before daylight to prevent the screen from being exposed in the sunlight. What a night!

 

I ended up with an edition of 25 out of the nearly 50 I printed ;]. You can find more info about it at my etsy.com shop (link available in my profile).

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Taken on September 1, 2007