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426/4b #09205-39  FAVSTVS Hercules S.C., for Pompey 3 small wreaths and globe for his Triumphs 79BC 71BC 61BC, large wreath for Corona Aurea 63BC, aplustre and corn-ear for Cura Annona 57BC, Denarius. This type without Faustus Sulla mongram. | by Ahala
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426/4b #09205-39 FAVSTVS Hercules S.C., for Pompey 3 small wreaths and globe for his Triumphs 79BC 71BC 61BC, large wreath for Corona Aurea 63BC, aplustre and corn-ear for Cura Annona 57BC, Denarius. This type without Faustus Sulla mongram.

Denarius. BC. 3.85grams. Rome mint. Cornelia. Crawford 426/04b FAVSTVS. Obverse: hd young Hercules r wearing lionskin, SC behind. No monogram.. Reverse: Globe surrounded by one large wreath, three small wreaths, aplustre, and wheat ear. Scarce.

 

CORNELIA. Obv — The beardless head of Hercules coiffed with the jaws and skin of the Nemean lion : behind it S(enatus) C(onsulto). On some coins there is also the monogram of FAVSTVS. The portrait certainly does not represent Pompey; nor can it be that of Sulla, since it was then forbidden to place the effigies of a living person on a coin. I am inclined therefore — with other numismatists — to think it a handsome conventional portrait of the young Hercules; though, as Eckhel, remarks, "we cannot give the reason for Faustus's using that type".

 

Rev — Absque epigraphe. A globe surrounded with four laurel chaplets, the one on the lower verge being supported by an acrostolium of a ship on the left, and an ear of wheat on the right: an allusion, it has been advanced, to the destruction of the pirates and consequent abundance in Rome. The uppermost chaplet is the largest, and the others are pretty equal with each other ; but unless it can be proved that the obverse bears the portrait of a Roman in the guise of a god, we have no clue to their precise meaning. Riccio, indeed, coolly says: — "The four crowns may mean that the hero had conquered the four parts of the world, if we may suppose that the Romans knew of America". Q.E.D.! Havercamp — in his Thesaurus Numismaticus — thinks they allude to Pompey's triumphs; but they were more likely to have been struck by Faustus, to the glories of his father, Sylla.

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Taken on September 12, 2009