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296/1 Cornelia Denarius CN.BLASIO CN.F. head of Scipio Africanus, Jupiter Juno Minerva AM#9234-38 | by Ahala
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296/1 Cornelia Denarius CN.BLASIO CN.F. head of Scipio Africanus, Jupiter Juno Minerva AM#9234-38

Denarius. 112BC. 3.82grams. Rome mint. Cornelia. Crawford 296/01 CN.BLASIO CN.F. Obverse: hd Scipio r. Reverse: Jupiter Juno Minrva stg. Scarce.

 

Northumberland Smyth 1856:

Cornelia. Obv — CN(eius) BLASIO, CN(eii) F(ilius). The head of a warrior, apparently Mars, in a Grecian plumed helmet, above which is the denarial mark X , and behind the neck a dagger. A common coin, though we know nothing of this Blasius.

 

Rev — Absque epigraphe. A naked virile figure with a lance stands in the centre, holding a girdle and some arrow-heads in his left hand. A close comparison leads me to infer that the arrow-heads are the upper part of a fulmen, the rest of which is hidden behind the body. A stolated and helmed female at right is in the act of crowning him; on the left stands another draped lady, holding a hasta pura, but instead of a helmet she wears a simple vitta as a diadem. In the field, between the two first figures, is the Greek letter Psi, coarsely inscribed, and on the exergum ROMA. The figure must typify Jupiter with his known attributes, the spear of divinity and the thunderbolt ; and some of the varieties further confirm this view, by having an eagle between the letters of the exergum. It would then follow that the Amazonian female is Minerva, and the looker-on Juno. It is, notwithstanding, but fair to give the conclusions to which Eckhel arrived: — "Antiquaries", he observes, "differ respecting this reverse, though nearly all make it to be Bacchus with a thyrsus and arrows ; which last, however, Vaillant has hastily concluded to be a bush of dry cinnamon. He (Bacchus) is being crowned by Pallas for the glorious termination of his wars. ... I cannot say who the other woman may be."

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Taken on October 16, 2006