Morwrol / Maritime
Capten / Captain John Morris , " Tan y Fedw "

Prior to the war with France, the inhabitants carried on a commercial intercourse with Ireland, Spain, and Italy. The trade is now principally coastwise, and consists chiefly in the exportation of timber, poles for collieries, bark, copper and lead ore, black-jack, manganese, turnery, webs, and slates; and in the importation of corn, flour and meal, coal, limestone, American and Baltic timber, hides, and grocery. The harbour is formed by the mouth of the river Maw being partially closed by a small island, called Ynys-y-Brawd, or the Friar's Island, and a gravel beach to the south: the island defends it from the billows of the ocean, and anciently afforded pasturage for sheep and cattle, but owing to the shifting of the sands, a great part is now inundated. The entrance is rendered somewhat difficult and dangerous, in consequence of these sands, the principal of which are the banks called the North and South Bars; vessels of considerable burthen can only enter and depart at spring tides. In the year 1802 the harbour was greatly improved by the erection of a small pier, or embankment of stone, under the authority of an act of parliament, and at a total expense of £1660; the depth of water was thus increased, and the loading and unloading of vessels considerably facilitated. At the same time a new quay was constructed. A buoy has been laid down upon each of the bars, and a beacon has been erected near the pier; so that the natural obstacles opposed to the growth of the port have been in a great measure removed. The river Maw, over which is a ferry at this place, is navigable for boats of under twenty tons' burthen to within two miles of Dôlgelley. The sea has made considerable encroachment on this part of the coast: to the north of the town was formerly a verdant plain, about half a mile long, and a quarter of a mile broad, now entirely covered by the waters, and over which passed the line of road that has since been cut along the rocky elevations to the right. Ship-building and the tanning of leather are carried on, the latter to a considerable extent. A great quantity of peat is obtained in a neighbouring turbary, through which a canal has been cut, walled on each side with stone, by means of which and the river Maw this species of fuel is conveyed in vessels either to Barmouth or Dôlgelley. Here are two weekly markets, on Tuesday and Friday; and fairs are held on Shrove-Monday, Whit-Monday, October 7th, and November 21st.

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Hanes y Bad Achub / Lifeboat History

www.barmouthlifeboat.co.uk/History page.htm

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Llongau a gollwyd ym Mae Tremadog ac ar Sarn Badrig.

Ships lost in Tremadog Bay and on St Patrick's Causeway.

freespace.virgin.net/r.cadwalader/maritime/lifeboat/wreck...

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