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Deforestation | by adriansalamandre
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Deforestation

Deforestation

Collage

160 X 110 cms

Every photo is cut out of National Geographic magazines and glued down onto collaging board.

This collage took me around 4 months of fulltime work…

I am raising funds for a Borneo based charity called HUTAN. I have so far raised more than 2,000€ (2010-2011)through poster sales. Please go to www.hutan.org.my

Amongst the details in this collage you can find:

 

A herd of cows grazing on a newly deforested region of Brazil’s Amazon basin. Fast food restaurants in the U.S.A. including McDonald’s buy this meat, even though they deny any involvement in deforestation.

 

To the right, there is a huge area being cleared for growing Soya beans. This crop is then distributed worldwide mainly as animal feed.

 

Towards the lower centre one can find an illegal farmer, busy planting palms for the palm oil trade. A number of animals are trying to dissuade him: a mouse with a STOP sign, a monkey dropping a large stone on his hand, whilst a giant gerbil is about to give him the fright of his life. Palm oil ends up in a wide variety of products, from fast foods, chocolate and soap to cosmetics and even cleaning products.

 

Most of the animals in this collage have taken up arms in a desperate attempt to save their ever-shrinking habitat. You can find:

A snow monkey armed with a rifle and cannon.

A grasshopper mouse (shouting orders) equipped with a decorative dagger.

A tiny poison arrow frog wearing a helmet, armed with a silver plated pistol.

A lemur handing over an M-16 assault rifle to a giant kangaroo rat.

A team of meerkats moving a heavy machine-gun into position.

A grizzly bear sniper.

A tortoise complete with crash helmet and a delivery of grenades.

A trio of chimpanzees are launching grenades at a lumberjack about 3 metres away. If you look really closely you can even see their selection of rocket-propelled grenades and launcher!

A clan of prairie dogs are awarding a veteran fighter with a medal, whilst to the left a Philippine tarsier is suffering from shell shock.

A mouse can be seen whispering death threats into the ear of a lumberjack, but he’s closed his eyes and put earplugs in…what a coward!

Elsewhere, some naughty proboscis monkeys are tying a lumberjack’s legs together.

A wild cat is about to shred a logger’s hand to ribbons and a man carrying a large tree trunk is being attacked by a mouse, 2 prairie puppies and a squirrel.

Sadly, a lot of the animals are under threat from exploitation. Here is a list of some of the endangered species I have included in the collage. You can find:

Brown howler monkey (population declining)

Buffy tufted-ear marmoset (vunerable, less than 10 000 individuals)

Burrowing bettong (population 5 000 and rising)

Crowned lemur (vunerable, declining population)

Gee’s golden langur (endangered, less than 3 000 individuals)

Giant kangaroo rat (endangered, population unknown)

Golden bamboo lemur (critically endangered, less than 5 000 individuals)

Golden crowned sifaka lemur (critically endangered, 6 000-10 000 individuals)

Golden headed lion tamarin (endangered, less than 2 000 individuals)

Hispaniolan solenodon (critically endangered)

Kinkajou (population declining but not threatened)

Malagasay civet (vunerable but unknown population)

Margay cat (population declining)

Pileated gibbon (vunerable, 30 000 and declining)

Philippine tarsier (rare but population unknown)

Proboscis monkey (endangered, less than 1000 individuals)

Rabbit-eared bandicoot (vunerable, less than 10 000 individuals)

Red ruffed lemur (endangered but unknown population)

Slender loris (population declining)

Sokoke scops owl (vunerable, less than 1,000 pairs)

Spectacled bear (vunerable, 5 000-30 000 individuals)

Sumatran rhinoceros (endangered, estimated at 400 individuals)

Western barred bandicoot (vunerable, less than 10 000 individuals)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Taken on February 22, 2010