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Neidpath Viaduct | by Neillwphoto
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Neidpath Viaduct

The A lIsted Neidpath Viaduct which crossed the River Tweed near Peebels.

 

Here is the description of it from Historic Scotland:

 

Opened 1864 for the Caledonian Railway. Skewed 8-span former railway viaduct crossing the River Tweed. Rock-faced ashlar spandrels and voussoirs. Low stone parapets with cast-iron intermediate parapets.

 

N ELEVATION: rock-faced spandrels and voussoirs leading to skewed intrados; rusticated buttress pilasters decorated with cruciform arrow slits and smooth angle margins extending from rounded cutwaters. Semicircular course leading to stone and painted cast-iron parapet; squared piers formed from buttresses linking cast-iron parapet. 8th arch meeting embankment with later steps leading to track bed (now footpath).

 

S ELEVATION: rock-faced spandrels and voussoirs leading to skewed intrados; rusticated buttress pilasters decorated with cruciform arrow slits and smooth angle margins extending from rounded cutwaters. Semicircular course leading to ashlar and painted cast-iron parapet; squared piers formed from buttresses linking cast-iron parapet. 1st and 8th arches meeting embankments to either side of the River Tweed.

 

E TO W ELEVATION: sections of droved ashlar parapet wall at both ends, flat copes and slightly projecting bases with chamfered angles; rusticated end returns with polished angle margins. Sections of geometrically patterned, painted cast-iron parapet joined by squared stone piers (rising at regular intervals from buttresses) flanking full length of former track bed, now footpath.

 

Statement of Special Interest

 

Part of a B-Group with South Park Wood Railway Tunnel (listed separately). Originally this viaduct carried the railway line to Symington, Biggar & Broughton. As this viaduct was sited to the west of Peebles, it was built and owned by the Caledonian Railway. The Bridge was known as the "Queen's Bridge". Originally, a cross-Borders line between Glasgow and Berwick had been proposed by the Caledonian Railway in 1846 but had met with fierce opposition in Parliament by the North British Railway (who ran the line to the East of Peebles). Subsequently the line was delayed until permission was granted to the Syminton Biggar and Broughton Railway (who had been funded by the Caledonian Company) to construct it. By the time the line was opened, the SB & B Railway had been absorbed into the larger Caledonian Railway. The architect of the bridge is said to have carved a rough builder's model from a turnip. The viaduct remained in use until the early 1960s although the passenger service ended in June 1950. The viaduct now forms part of a Peebles town walk. Listed due to its fine masonry, ironwork and its unusual skew plan.

 

portal.historicenvironment.scot/

 

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Taken on September 24, 2016