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THE FUEL HAULERS (With Straw Sandals on Women and Horses!) -- TWO WAYS TO CROP A STEREOVIEW in OLD JAPAN | by Okinawa Soba (Rob)
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THE FUEL HAULERS (With Straw Sandals on Women and Horses!) -- TWO WAYS TO CROP A STEREOVIEW in OLD JAPAN

FOR THOSE NOT INTO THE TECHNICAL SIDE OF 3-D PRINTING AND MOUNTING, JUST SKIP THE CAPTION BELOW, AND HIT THE ALL SIZES BUTTON OVER THE PHOTO. IT'S A NICE-TO-LOOK-AT CAPTURE BY PHOTOGRAPHER T. ENAMI ON A RUSTIC ROAD IN OLD JAPAN.

 

CLEAN COPY OF THE BOTTOM PRINT FOR BLOGGING : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/2311911340/

 

 

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A lantern-slide version of this image is labelled as "S 478 - TRANSPORTING FUELS". However, Enami also has a Cataloged image titled : "S 519 - COUNTRY WOMEN CARRYING FIREWOOD ON THE HORSE BACK.

 

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What ? Straw Sandals or Booties for a Horse ????

 

Yup. Welcome to Flickr, where anything can happen ! www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/2662850780/

 

The above stereoviews published by T. ENAMI over 100 years ago are a good example for showing a bit of the "vertical crop freedom" that was available to the photographer.

 

TOP STEREOVIEW : The skyline of the mountains is clearly shown, and the woman's feet are close to the bottom edge of the print.

 

BOTTOM STEREOVIEW : Enami crops from a lower portion of the print, which raises the central subject more to the middle, and moves the skyline off the upper edge of the print.

 

WHERE DID THIS LEE-WAY COME FROM ?

 

The original glass negative was 5 x 7 inch format. The septum dividing the two halves of the image gave the photographer two images 5 x 3 1/2 inches on either side.

 

Since the standard format was generally "square" images as seen above, a 3 1/2 inch crop could be taken from either the top, bottom, or anywhere along that 5 inch high strip of image.

 

(Actually, it was a little less than 5 inches due to the plate-holder margin around the image area)

 

These are aesthetic decisions, and many examples of this "variant cropping" from the same negative can also be seen in the work of other stereo photographers and publishers.

 

Some photographers framed the image with the intent of showing most of the negative, and published their work as taller "CABINET" size stereoviews.

 

As far as is known, Enami never made the larger size stereoviews himself, but GEORGE ROSE of Australia did publish many Enami 3-D images in the fuller cabinet size.

 

Rose could do this because it is believed he obtained the full copy-negatives and/or copy-prints from Enami himself.

 

For more on Enami see : www.t-enami.org/

 

 

SEE MORE OF ENAMI'S CLASSIC IMAGES IN THIS FLICKr COLLECTION : www.flickr.com/photos/24443965@N08/collections/7215761388...

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Taken on October 18, 2007