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Image from page 594 of "Life and times of William E. Gladstone : an account of his ancestry and boyhood, his career at Eton and Oxford, his entrance into public life, his rise to leadership and fame, his genius as statesman and author, and his influence o | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 594 of "Life and times of William E. Gladstone : an account of his ancestry and boyhood, his career at Eton and Oxford, his entrance into public life, his rise to leadership and fame, his genius as statesman and author, and his influence o

Identifier: williamegladston00ridp

Title: Life and times of William E. Gladstone : an account of his ancestry and boyhood, his career at Eton and Oxford, his entrance into public life, his rise to leadership and fame, his genius as statesman and author, and his influence on the progress of the nineteenth century

Year: 1898 (1890s)

Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900

Subjects: Gladstone, W. E. (William Ewart), 1809-1898 Statesmen

Publisher: Springfield, O. : J.W. Jones

Contributing Library: University of California Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

  

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between Great Britain and Ireland. Hethought the agrarian crimes in the latter country to be no more than asymptom of a deep-seated evil, and a coercive legislation was at best nomore than repressive, and not curative. If like conditions had existed inEngland and Scotland like consequences would have followed. The timehad now come when, if coercion should be still employed as a remedy, itmust be of a different kind. It must be downright coercion, enforced withresolute purpose and with the sword. The people of Great Britain wouldnot resort to such coercion until they had exhausted every other expedient. The speaker went on to show by statistics that all crimes, includ-ing agrarian crimes, in Ireland had fallen off under natural causes duringthe last sixty years to a remarkable degree. This betterment had notbeen effected, therefore, by the exceptional coercive legislation. This heproved by the facts; for at those times when coercion had been adopted the FIRST BATTLE FOR iluME RULE. 589

 

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■:::!:!:iiii!iniii::iiii!il!l!i:ii;i!l!lliU-if:l ■linill!l!i:it/r!i:!l!i;.l!l.:r/!lf!ril!i.f!lfll/.iJll/!!l!:!l/ll/llllill!l!:illllilill, INTRODUCTION OF HOME RULE BILL—GLADSTONES PERORATION. 59© LIFE AND TIMES OK WILLIAM E. GLADSTONE. improvement had not been as considerable as at other times. Coercionwas no more than a medicine. Neither men nor nations could subsist onmedicine. The situation in Ireland as it respected agrarian crime washabitual, and the coercive lav.s had not cured the habit. The speaker next took up the question of preserving the unity of theempire. Coercion did not conduce to the imperial unity. Neither did itrestore social order and promote liberty. The question was how to recon-cile the imperial unity with diversity of legislation. This question had beensolved by Great Britain in the case of Scotland. It had also been solvedby other nations. It would not tend to dismemberment of the imperialunion to allow of legislative diversit}-. The proposition which t

  

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Taken circa 1898