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Image from page 592 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 592 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cul

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

HE ENGLISH FLOWER GARDEN. FRITILLARIA (7^;/////^ry).—Bulbs ofthe Lily family, several of which are valu-able, some, such as the Crown Imperial,being stately, others such as F. rcciirvn,being delicate and pretty, but most havedull-tinted curiously interesting flowers.They may be put to many uses : the CrownImperial is a fine plant for the mixedborder or the shrubbery, and, beingvigorous, is able to take care of itself inthe wild garden. Its early spring growthmakes it valuable. The Snakes-head{F. Melcagris) and others, such as F./atzfolia, pyrenaica., together with thechoicer kinds, are fitted for the bulbborder and for grassy places. Only oneor two require special treatment ; all theothers thrive in ordinary garden soil.They may all be readily increased byoffsets from the old bulbs, which shouldbe lifted every three or four years andplanted in fresh soil—a process verybeneficial to the plants. The liftingshould be done in autumn, and the bulbsreplanted without delay. The following

 

Text Appearing After Image:

tt>«\nn**iaiv,\\\i\v\\\\\M\\\ White Fritillary are among the most desirable for generalcultivation : — F. aurea, one of the prettiest of thegenus, is quite hardy, is about 5 in. high,and has a stem of four to six in. thick,fleshy, deep green leaves, with a nodding flower, which is pale yellow spotted, orchequered with brown. Silesia. F. Burneti, a handsome hardy plantabout 9 in. high, with solitary droopingblossoms, 2 in. long, which are of a plumcolour chequered with yellowish-green.Alps. Flowers with the Snowdrop, and isas easy to grow. F. imperialis {Croivn Imperial).—Ashowy and stately plant, from 3 to 4 ft.high, with stout bright green shoots,

 

 

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Taken circa 1906