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Image from page 41 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cult | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 41 of "The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their cult

Identifier: englishflowergar00robi

Title: The English flower garden and home grounds : design and arrangement shown by existing examples of gardens in Great Britain and Ireland, followed by a description of the plants, shrubs and trees for the open-air garden and their culture

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Robinson, W. (William), 1838-1935

Subjects: Flower gardening Plants, Ornamental Cottage gardening Gardens

Publisher: London : J. Murray

Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

 

 

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Text Appearing Before Image:

—The architect is a goodgardener when he makes a beautiful house. Whatever is to be doneor considered afterwards, one is always helped and encouraged by itspresence ; while, on the other hand, scarcely any amount of skill ingardening softens the presence of an ugly building. No one hasmore reason to rejoice at the presence of good architecture than thegardener and planter, and all stonework near the house, even in thegarden, should be dealt with by the architect. But when architecture goes beyond this limit, and seeks to replace Kciid before the Architectural Association on Friday, December i6, 1893.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

ii!ilillllllliillilllilillilJli»ll!lSllllli1llll|lii^^ THE ENGLISH FLOWER GARDEN. what should be a living garden by an elaborate tracery on theground, then error and waste are at work, and the result is ugliness.The proof of this is at Versailles, at the Crystal Palace in greatpart, in the gardens in Vienna, and at Caserta, near Naples. Onemay not so freely mention private places as public ones, but manyugly and extravagant things have been done by trying to adapta mode of garden design essential in a country like Italy, wherepeople often lived for healths sake on tops of the hills, to gardensin the plains and valleys of England. I know a terrace in Englandbuilt right against the house, so as to exclude the light from, andmake useless, what were once the reception rooms. That deplorableresult came about by endeavouring to adapt Italian modes to Englishconditions, and was the work of Sir Charles Barry. To anyonedeeply interested in the question, one of the best places from whichto con

 

 

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Taken circa 1906