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Image from page 87 of "The sea-fisherman: comprising the chief methods of hook and line fishing in the British and other seas, and remarks on nets, boats, and boating. Profusely illustrated with woodcuts on leads, baited hooks, nets and boats, etc., and d | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 87 of "The sea-fisherman: comprising the chief methods of hook and line fishing in the British and other seas, and remarks on nets, boats, and boating. Profusely illustrated with woodcuts on leads, baited hooks, nets and boats, etc., and d

Identifier: cu31924003700204

Title: The sea-fisherman: comprising the chief methods of hook and line fishing in the British and other seas, and remarks on nets, boats, and boating. Profusely illustrated with woodcuts on leads, baited hooks, nets and boats, etc., and detailed descriptions of the same

Year: 1884 (1880s)

Authors: Wilcocks, James C

Subjects: Saltwater fishing Fishing

Publisher: London, Longmans, Green

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

Fig. 19. more than about one-eighth of an inch in thickness, and arewoven sufficiently close to prevent the escape of the Sand-Eels,whilst in the centre an opening is left fof their introduction,which is closed by a piece of flat cork accurately fitted to theaperture.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Fig. 20.—Courge in tow. A piece of small rope having an eye in it is passed overone end and firmly lashed at the other, by which it is towedastern of the boat (fig. 20), the rope having first been made fastthrough a hole in a small cleet, nailed to the stern of theboat, just above the surface of the water, as shown above. HOW TO MAKE COURGES. 67 Of these baskets the most useful size is 2 feet in length,and 7 inches in diameter, and certainly nothing can be betteradapted for the end intended, as it is very light, and the waterflows easily through it, whilst from its shape it offers lessresistance in passing through the water than any other whichcould be devised. It will be found equally useful as a live-baitcage for Shrimps, Prawns, other Crustacea, and small fish ingeneral; it might also be adopted for the same purpose for live-bait in Jack or Perch-fishing on a river or lake. In France thesecontrivances are made of wood; I have tried them, but theSand-Eels do not live nearly as lon

  

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Taken circa 1884