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Image from page 160 of "Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley...and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath | by Internet Archive Book Images
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Image from page 160 of "Nature neighbors, embracing birds, plants, animals, minerals, in natural colors by color photography, containing articles by Gerald Alan Abbott, Dr. Albert Schneider, William Kerr Higley...and other eminent naturalists. Ed. by Nath

Identifier: natureneighborse03bant

Title: www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book...

Year: 1914 (1910s)

Authors: Banta, Nathaniel Moore, 1867- Schneider, Albert, 1863- Higley, William Kerr, 1860-1908 Abbott, Gerard Alan

Subjects: Natural history

Publisher: Chicago, American Audobon association

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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ould never have been suspected. THE WATER-THRUSH* The Water-thrush has so manj^ popular names that itwill be recognized by most observers by one or more ofthem. It is called small-billed water-thrush, water wagtail,water kick-up, Besoy kick-up, and river pink (Jamaica),aquatic accentor, and New York aquatic thrush. It isfound chiefly east of the Mississippi River, north to theArctic Coast, breeding from the north border of the UnitedStates northward. It winters in more southern UnitedStates, all of middle America, northern South America, andall of West Indies. It is accidental in Greenland. In Illi-nois this species is known as a migrant, passing slowlythrough in spring and fall, though in the extreme southernportion a few pass the winter, especially if the season bemild. It frequents swampy woods and open, wet places,nesting on the ground or in the roots of overturned trees atthe borders of swamps. Mr. M. K. Barnum, of Syracuse,New York, found a nest of this species in the roots of a

 

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Taken circa 1914